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18 records – page 1 of 2.

[ACTUAL PROBLEMS OF AEROSPACE PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY IN THE WORKS OF G.M. ZARAKOVSKII].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264547
Source
Aviakosm Ekolog Med. 2015;49(2):69-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015

An historical review of the electrocardiogram of right bundle branch block in the Royal Canadian Air Force.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234513
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1987 Nov-Dec;3(8):375-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
G W Manning
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario, London.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1987 Nov-Dec;3(8):375-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerospace Medicine - history
Bundle-Branch Block - history
Canada
Electrocardiography - history
Humans
Military Personnel - history
Abstract
During the course of the Royal Canadian Air Force Electrocardiographic Program (1939-1986) a selected study of fit aircrew with right bundle branch block was studied. This review covers a period of 18 years during which a consecutive study of 139,651 men from 1960 to 1978 was carried out. Incomplete right bundle branch block of 0.10 s to 0.12 s occurred in 65 cases and complete right bundle branch block in 103 cases. The ages and follow-up periods are discussed. This study, in agreement with recent studies, indicates that right bundle branch block, both incomplete and complete, in itself does not indicate a dire prognosis, particularly when found in young men applying for aircrew training. The final conclusion is that right bundle branch block occurring in young applicants for aircrew training does not preclude their acceptance and this is now (since 1953) the policy of the Canadian armed forces.
PubMed ID
3427534 View in PubMed
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[AVIATION MEDICINE: THEORETICAL CONCEPTS AND FOCAL FUNDAMENTAL AND PRACTICAL ISSUES (for the 80th anniversary of the Research Test Center of Aerospace Medicine and Military Ergonomics)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264549
Source
Aviakosm Ekolog Med. 2015;49(2):5-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
I M Zhdanko
A A Pisarev
A A Vorona
V V Lapa
M N Khomenko
Source
Aviakosm Ekolog Med. 2015;49(2):5-11
Date
2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerospace Medicine - history
Anniversaries and Special Events
Biomedical Research - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Human Engineering - history
Humans
Military Medicine - history
Russia
Societies, Medical - history
Systems Theory
Abstract
The article discloses postulates of theoretical concepts that make the methodological basis for addressing the real-world aviation medicine challenges of humanizing aviator's environment, labor content and means, and health and performance maintenance. Under consideration are focal fundamental and practical issues arising with the technological progress in aviation and dealt with at the AF CRI Research Test Center of Aerospace Medicine and Military Ergonomics.
PubMed ID
26087580 View in PubMed
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[Department of aviation and space medicine: 75 years].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258252
Source
Aviakosm Ekolog Med. 2014;48(4):63-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
V V Kniga
Source
Aviakosm Ekolog Med. 2014;48(4):63-8
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerospace Medicine - history
Aviation - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Russia
PubMed ID
25365880 View in PubMed
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Historical Review of Lower Body Negative Pressure Research in Space Medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265361
Source
Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2015 Jul;86(7):633-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Mark R Campbell
John B Charles
Source
Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2015 Jul;86(7):633-40
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerospace Medicine - history
Biomedical Research - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Lower Body Negative Pressure - history
Russia
Space Flight - history
United States
Abstract
Cephalad redistribution of intravascular and extravascular fluid occurs as a result of weightlessness during spaceflight. This provokes cardiovascular, cardiopulmonary, and autonomic nervous system responses. The resulting altered functional state can result in orthostatic hypotension and intolerance upon landing and return to a gravity environment. In-flight lower body negative pressure (LBNP) transiently restores normal body fluid distribution. Early in the U.S. space program, LBNP was devised as a way to test for orthostatic intolerance. With the development of the Skylab Program and longer duration spaceflight, it was realized that it could provide a method of monitoring orthostatic intolerance in flight and predicting the post-landing orthostatic response. LBNP was also investigated not only as an in-flight cardiovascular orthostatic stress test, but also as a countermeasure to cardiovascular deconditioning on Soviet space stations, Skylab, and the Shuttle. It is still being used by the Russian program on the International Space Station as an end-of-flight countermeasure.
PubMed ID
26102144 View in PubMed
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Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2014;(9-10):146-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2014;(9-10):146-7
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerospace Medicine - history
Animals
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Russia
Stress, Physiological
PubMed ID
25823059 View in PubMed
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In-flight medical incidents in the NASA-Mir program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173848
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2005 Jul;76(7):692-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Igor B Gontcharov
Irina V Kovachevich
Sam L Pool
Oleg L Navinkov
Michael R Barratt
Valery V Bogomolov
Nancy House
Author Affiliation
State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation, Institute for Biomedical Problems, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2005 Jul;76(7):692-6
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerospace Medicine - history - organization & administration
Astronauts
Environmental monitoring
First Aid
History, 20th Century
Humans
International Cooperation
Life Support Systems
Program Evaluation
Russia
Space Flight - history - organization & administration
United States
United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Abstract
This paper summarizes medical experience during the six NASA-Mir flights from March 14, 1995, to June 4, 1998. There were 7 U.S. astronauts who were part of 6 Mir space crews and worked jointly with 12 Russian cosmonauts. Advances in space medicine have created a safer environment; however, experience shows that crewmembers experience traumatic injuries and illnesses of diverse etiologies during spaceflight. During these joint flights both Russian and U.S. medical kits were available to crewmembers who could access either medical kit as appropriate. The Russian medical team had primary responsibility for monitoring and care of all crewmembers and analyzing medical results. When medical incidents occurred, the appropriate Russian or U.S. medical team determined the plan for diagnosis and treatment. Each team kept the other informed regarding medical situations during the flights and strictly observed the principles of medical confidentiality. A summary of medical incidents by programmatic element is described as experienced by the crewmembers and the ground support medical teams. The most frequent medical cases were small traumatic injuries to the skin and mucous membranes and fluctuations in the cardiovascular system, manifesting primarily in the form of cardiac dysrhythmias. The ability to use both the Russian medical aids and the U.S. medical kit significantly increased the effectiveness and reliability of therapeutic and prophylactic care. The degree of medical care and cooperation established precedents for integrating these systems for the medical support of expeditions on the International Space Station.
PubMed ID
16018356 View in PubMed
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In memoriam: Oleg Georgovitch Gazenko, M.D. 1918-2007.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158361
Source
Telemed J E Health. 2008 Jan-Feb;14(1):1-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
Arnauld Nicogossian
Author Affiliation
George Mason University, Fairfax, VA.
Source
Telemed J E Health. 2008 Jan-Feb;14(1):1-3
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerospace Medicine - history
Disasters
History, 20th Century
Humans
International Cooperation
Russia
Telemedicine - history
PubMed ID
18328018 View in PubMed
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Interview with Dr. Arnold S. Barer, a Soviet Space Medicine Pioneer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280776
Source
Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017 Feb 01;88(2):154-155
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-01-2017
Author
Charles R Doarn
Source
Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017 Feb 01;88(2):154-155
Date
Feb-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerospace Medicine - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Russia
USSR
PubMed ID
28095962 View in PubMed
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Milestones of space medicine development in Russia (establishment and evolution of the Institute of Biomedical Problems).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193367
Source
J Gravit Physiol. 1997 Oct;4(3):1-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1997
Author
O G Gazenko
Author Affiliation
Institute of Biomedical Problems, Moscow, Russia.
Source
J Gravit Physiol. 1997 Oct;4(3):1-4
Date
Oct-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerospace Medicine - history - organization & administration
History, 20th Century
Humans
International Agencies
Life Support Systems
Monitoring, Physiologic
Research
Russia
Space Flight - history - organization & administration
Sports Medicine
Submarine Medicine
USSR
Weightlessness
Abstract
This paper describes the history of the Institute of Biomedical Problems (IMBP): its birth and development. IMBP's directors were: Andrei V. Libedinsky (1963-1965), Vasily V. Parin (1965-1967), Oleg G. Gazenko (1968-1988), and Anatoly I. Grigoriev (1988 to the present). Most of the early employees of IMBP came from the USSR Air Force Institute of Aviation Medicine and the USSR Ministry of Health Institute of Biophysics. The major goals of IMBP were: development of a system of medical monitoring and support of long-duration space missions, selection and training of civilian crew members, bioengineering testing of flight equipment, and development of life support system concepts and requirements. The paper presents major results of the above research activities.
PubMed ID
11541863 View in PubMed
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18 records – page 1 of 2.