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Ads pressure Ontario to butt out in retail locations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174401
Source
CMAJ. 2005 Jun 7;172(12):1544
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-7-2005

Advertising and alcohol sales: a legal impact study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225489
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1991 Nov;52(6):555-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1991
Author
C R Makowsky
P C Whitehead
Author Affiliation
Health Services and Promotion Branch, Health and Welfare Canada, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1991 Nov;52(6):555-67
Date
Nov-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advertising as Topic - legislation & jurisprudence
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Alcoholic Beverages - economics - supply & distribution
Alcoholism - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Incidence
Public Policy
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Abstract
According to the single distribution theory increases in the availability of alcoholic beverages in the general population are associated with increases in average consumption and increases in alcohol-related damage. If it can be demonstrated that advertising contributes to availability, perhaps in the form of what has been called social or subjective availability, then advertising could be considered an appropriate target of prevention. A 58-year ban on advertising of alcoholic beverages was lifted in Saskatchewan in 1983. Data on monthly sales of beer, wine and distilled spirits were examined for the years 1981 to 1987. Box-Jenkins time series techniques were used to estimate the statistical relationship between the policy change and volume of sales of alcoholic beverages. The results revealed that sales of beer increased and sales of spirits decreased following the change in legislation that permitted alcohol advertising in Saskatchewan. The main finding is that there was no impact on wine and total alcohol sales from the introduction of alcohol advertising. Alcohol advertising may have produced a substitution effect with respect to beer and spirits, but this was not predicted. This evaluation suggests that alcohol advertising is not a contributory force that influences the overall level of alcohol consumption. The place of advertising in the single distribution theory remains not proven, and the place of advertising as an instrument of public policy with respect to the prevention of alcohol-related damage remains in question.
PubMed ID
1758183 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Nurse. 1996 Sep;92(8):60, 59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996

Alcohol advertising bans and alcohol abuse: an international perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226519
Source
J Health Econ. 1991 May;10(1):65-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1991
Author
H. Saffer
Author Affiliation
National Bureau of Economic Research, New York University, NY 10003.
Source
J Health Econ. 1991 May;10(1):65-79
Date
May-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Advertising as Topic - legislation & jurisprudence
Alcohol Drinking - legislation & jurisprudence
Alcoholic Beverages - utilization
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Europe - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis - mortality
Models, Statistical
Public Policy
United States - epidemiology
World Health
Abstract
This paper examines the effect of banning broadcast advertising of alcoholic beverages. The data used in this study are a pooled time series from 17 countries for the period 1970 to 1983. The empirical results show that countries with bans on spirits advertising have about 16% lower alcohol consumption than countries with no bans and that countries with bans on beer and wine advertising have about 11% lower alcohol consumption than countries with bans only on spirits advertising.
Notes
Comment In: J Health Econ. 1993 Jul;12(2):213-2810127781
PubMed ID
10112150 View in PubMed
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[Allowable information about cosmetic interventions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166058
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Dec 14;126(24):3326
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-14-2006
Author
Kirti Mahajan Thomassen
Author Affiliation
Forhandlings- og helserettsavdelingen, Den norske laegeforening. kirti.thomassen@legeforeningen.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Dec 14;126(24):3326
Date
Dec-14-2006
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advertising as Topic - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Norway
Patient Education as Topic - legislation & jurisprudence
Surgery, Plastic
PubMed ID
17170799 View in PubMed
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Analysis of factors related to illegal tobacco sales to young people in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200001
Source
Tob Control. 1999;8(3):301-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
B. O'Grady
M. Asbridge
T. Abernathy
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Tob Control. 1999;8(3):301-5
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Advertising as Topic - legislation & jurisprudence
Child Advocacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Humans
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Plants, Toxic
Prevalence
Random Allocation
Tobacco
Tobacco Industry - legislation & jurisprudence
Tobacco Use Disorder - epidemiology
Abstract
To identify and to discuss factors influencing illegal merchant sales of tobacco to underage people in Ontario, Canada.
Results were obtained through random retail compliance checks of tobacco merchants. A multivariate analysis specified the relationship between selected independent variables and the willingness of tobacco merchants to sell to minors. The selected independent variables included retail operation type, community population size, the presence of tobacco production, signage, sex and age of volunteers, smoking prevalence rates, and enforcement rates.
A random, stratified sample of 438 tobacco retailers in 186 communities in Ontario.
Willingness of merchants to sell tobacco to minors.
Older youths and girls were more likely to be sold tobacco products. Purchase attempts carried out in tobacco-producing regions were also statistically related to illegal sales.
Policy efforts to control youth access to tobacco in Canada may need to invoke legislation requiring merchants to request proper identification from customers who appear to be under the age of 25, and who seek to purchase tobacco products. Further attention could also be directed at tobacco control policies and enforcement strategies that need to consider the unique challenges faced by jurisdictions where the tobacco industry is a powerful presence.
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1997 Oct 9;337(15):1044-519321533
Cites: JAMA. 1987 Jun 26;257(24):3387-93586269
Cites: JAMA. 1989 Jan 6;261(1):80-32908999
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1991 Jul;81(7):891-32053666
Cites: JAMA. 1991 Dec 11;266(22):3159-611956104
Cites: JAMA. 1991 Dec 11;266(22):3168-711956106
Cites: Prev Med. 1992 May;21(3):320-81614994
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1993 Feb;83(2):227-328427328
Cites: N C Med J. 1995 Jan;56(1):59-637862209
Cites: Am J Health Promot. 1995 Jan-Feb;9(3):172-410150719
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1996 Feb;86(2):221-48633739
Cites: Tob Control. 1996 Spring;5(1):46-518795859
PubMed ID
10599575 View in PubMed
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Back to basics in the fight against tobacco.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207982
Source
Can J Public Health. 1997 Jul-Aug;88(4):221-4
Publication Type
Article

Canada severely limits means for conveying tobacco companies' messages to potential users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232184
Source
JAMA. 1988 Nov 4;260(17):2480-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-1988

Canadian government intends to attack smoking graphically.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197834
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2000 Jul 19;92(14):1123-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-19-2000

Canadian marketing codes: how well are they controlling pharmaceutical promotion?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219217
Source
Int J Health Serv. 1994;24(1):91-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
J. Lexchin
Source
Int J Health Serv. 1994;24(1):91-104
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advertising as Topic - legislation & jurisprudence
Canada
Drug Industry - legislation & jurisprudence
Drug Information Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Drug Prescriptions
Ethics, Pharmacy
Humans
Abstract
Pharmaceutical promotion in Canada is controlled by two codes: a voluntary one developed by the Pharmaceutical Advertising Advisory Board dealing mostly with printed promotional material, and one from the Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association of Canada covering other forms of promotion. This article looks at enforcement of the provisions of these codes and at areas in which they are deficient. One of the major weaknesses in both codes is their lack of effective sanctions for companies that violate their provisions. Strong codes are necessary because many physicians rely heavily on promotional material for their source of prescribing information. However, voluntary codes or codes developed by the industry are inherently weak and lack effective enforcement mechanisms. Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is currently very active in curtailing promotional excesses, government control is not the solution since regulatory action will depend on the ideological position of the head of the regulatory body and/or the party in power. An independent body backed by legislative authority is preferable.
PubMed ID
8150569 View in PubMed
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53 records – page 1 of 6.