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Adverse effects on risk of ischaemic heart disease of adding sugar to hot beverages in hypertensives using diuretics. A six year follow-up in the Copenhagen Male Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11267
Source
Blood Press. 1996 Mar;5(2):91-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
P. Suadicani
H O Hein
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Epidemiological Research Unit, Clinic of Occupational Medicine, Righospitalet, State University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Blood Press. 1996 Mar;5(2):91-7
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Coffee
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Sucrose - adverse effects
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - etiology
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Tea
Abstract
Non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and essential hypertension (EH) are two of several manifestations of the insulin resistance syndrome. Although subjects with NIDDM and subjects with EH share a common defect in carbohydrate metabolism, only diabetics are advised to avoid sugar. We tested the theory that an adverse effect of diuretics treatment in men with EH with respect to risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) would depend on the intake of dietary sugar using sugar in hot beverages as a marker. The cohort consisted of 2,899 men from the Copenhagen Male Study aged 53-74 years (mean 63) who were without overt cardiovascular disease. Potential confounders were: age, alcohol,smoking, physical activity, body mass index, blood pressure, fasting lipids, cotinine, NIDDM,and social class. A total of 340 men took antihypertensives; 211 took diuretics (95% thiazides and related agents), and 129 used other antihypertensives. During 6 years, 179 men (6.2%) had a first IHD event. Among the 340 men taking antihypertensives, the incidence rate was 11%. Diuretics use was associated with a high risk of IHD in hypertensive men with a relatively high intake of dietary sugar; the cumulative incidence rate was 22%; in diuretics treated men with a low intake of sugar, the rate was 7%. After controlling for potential confounders, relative risk (95% ci.) was 3.1(1.3-7.6), p = 001. Among the 129 men who took other forms of antihypertensive drugs, the IHD incidence rate was 8%, and independent of the intake of sugar. The results indicate that the risk of IHD in hypertensives using diuretics is associated with intake of dietary sugar, which may explain at least some of the discouraging effects of antihypertensive agents on the reduction of risk of IHD.
PubMed ID
8860097 View in PubMed
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Avoidable cancers in the Nordic countries-The impact of alcohol consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302454
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2018 Nov;103:299-307. doi: 10.1016/j.ejca.2018.03.027. Epub 2018 May 5.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2018
Author
Andersson TM
Engholm G
Pukkala E
Stenbeck M
Tryggvadottir L
Storm H
Weiderpass E
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2018 Nov;103:299-307. doi: 10.1016/j.ejca.2018.03.027. Epub 2018 May 5.
Date
2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Finland
Iceland
Norway
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Neoplasms
Epidemiology
Risk factors
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Alcohol consumption is an important and preventable cause of cancer. The aim of this study was to quantify the proportion of the cancer burden in the Nordic countries linked to alcohol and estimate the potential for cancer prevention by changes in alcohol consumption.
METHODS: Using the Prevent macro-simulation model, the number of cancer cases in the Nordic countries over a 30-year period (2016-2045) was modelled for six sites, under different scenarios of changing alcohol consumption, and compared to the projected number of cases if constant alcohol consumption prevailed. The studied sites were colorectal, post-menopausal breast, oral cavity and pharynx, liver, larynx as well as oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma. The alcohol consumption was based on the categories of non-drinkers/occasional drinkers, light drinkers (12.5 and = 50 g/day) and heavy drinkers (>50 g/day).
RESULTS: About 83,000 cancer cases could be avoided in the Nordic countries in a 30-year period if alcohol consumption was entirely eliminated, which is 5.5% of the expected number of cases for the six alcohol-related cancer types. With a 50% reduction in the proportion with moderate alcohol consumption by year 2025, 21,500 cancer cases could be avoided. The number of avoidable cases was highest for post-menopausal breast and colorectal cancer, but the percentage was highest for oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma.
CONCLUSION: The results from this study can be used to understand the potential impact and significance of primary prevention programmes targeted towards reducing the alcohol consumption in the Nordic countries.
PubMed ID
29739641 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among waiters: 45 years of follow-up in five Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302437
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Mar;43(2):204-11. doi: 10.1177/1403494814565130. Epub 2015 Jan 6.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Reijula J1
Kjaerheim K
Lynge E
Martinsen JI
Reijula K
Sparén P
Tryggvadottir L
Weiderpass E
Pukkala E
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Mar;43(2):204-11. doi: 10.1177/1403494814565130. Epub 2015 Jan 6.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Finland
Iceland
Norway
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms
Occupational Exposure
Adverse effects
Occupations
Restaurants
Legislation & jurisprudence
Risk assessment
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries
Sex Distribution
Smoking
Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Abstract
AIMS: To study cancer risk patterns among waiters in the Nordic countries.
METHODS: We identified a cohort of 16,134 male and 81,838 female waiters from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. During the follow-up period from 1961 to 2005, we found that 19,388 incident cancer cases were diagnosed. Standardised incidence ratio (SIR) was defined as the observed number of cancer cases divided by the expected number, based on national age, time period and gender-specific cancer incidence rates in the general population.
RESULTS: The SIR of all cancers in waiters, in the five countries combined, was 1.46 (95% CI 1.41-1.51) in men and 1.09 (1.07-1.11) in women. In male waiters, the SIR decreased from 1.79 (1.63-1.96) in 1961-1975, to 1.33 (1.26-1.40) in 1991-2005, but remained stable among women. The SIR among male waiters was highest for cancers in the pharynx (6.11; 95% CI 5.02-7.37), oral cavity (4.91; 95% CI 3.81-6.24) and tongue (4.36; 95% CI 3.13-5.92); and in female waiters, in the larynx (2.17; 95% CI 1.63-2.82), oral cavity (1.96; 95% CI 1.60-2.34) and lung (1.89; 95% CI 1.80-1.99).
CONCLUSIONS: The risk of cancer among waiters was higher than in the general population. The elevated incidence in some cancer sites can likely be explained by higher alcohol consumption, the prevalence of smoking and occupational exposure to tobacco smoke. Hopefully, the incidence of cancer among waiters will decrease in the future, due to the banning of tobacco smoking in restaurants and bars in the Nordic countries.
PubMed ID
25564114 View in PubMed
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Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1966 Jun 9;128(23):669-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
1966 Jun 9
Author
Jensen E
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1966 Jun 9;128(23):669-71
Date
1966 Jun 9
Language
Danish
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cold Temperature/adverse effects
Denmark
Fatigue/mortality
Humans
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Evaluation of carcinogenic effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100401
Source
Bosn J Basic Med Sci. 2010 Aug;10(3):245-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Vahdettin Bayazit
Banu Bayram
Zeydin Pala
Ozkan Atan
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Mus Alparslan University, 49100, Mus, Turkey.
Source
Bosn J Basic Med Sci. 2010 Aug;10(3):245-50
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Cellular Phone
Denmark - epidemiology
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Neuroma, Acoustic - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the carcinogenic effects of electromagnetic fields on human. There are many effects of electromagnetic fields on human such as cancer, epidemiology, acute and chronic effects. These effects vary according to the field strength and environmental conditions. There have been many instances of harmful effects of electromagnetic fields from such seemingly innocuous devices as mobile phones, computers, power lines and domestic wiring. The balance of epidemiologic evidence indicates that mobile phone use of less than 10 years does not pose any increased risk of brain tumour or acoustic neuroma. For long-term use, data are sparse, and the following conclusions are therefore uncertain and tentative.
Notes
RefSource: Mehic B. Bosn J Basic Med Sci. 2010 Nov;10(4):331
PubMed ID
20846133 View in PubMed
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High-dose treatment with vitamin A analogues and risk of fractures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96947
Source
Arch Dermatol. 2010 May;146(5):478-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Peter Vestergaard
Lars Rejnmark
Leif Mosekilde
Author Affiliation
The Osteoporosis Clinic, Aarhus Amtssygehus, Tage Hansens Gade 2, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. p-vest@post4.tele.dk
Source
Arch Dermatol. 2010 May;146(5):478-82
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acitretin - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Dermatologic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Fractures, Bone - chemically induced
Humans
Isotretinoin - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Keratolytic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk assessment
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study fracture risk associated with use of systemic vitamin A analogue (isotretinoin and acitretin) treatment. DESIGN: Case-control study. SETTING: Nationwide registry. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 124 655 patients with fractures (cases) and 373 962 age- and sex-matched controls. Main Outcome Measure Incidence of fractures in patients with and without exposure to systemic vitamin A analogues. Confounder control was performed for social variables, contacts with hospitals and general practitioners, alcoholism, and a number of other variables known to potentially affect fracture risk, including use of systemic, intramuscular, and topical corticosteroids and antiepileptic drugs and comorbid conditions. RESULTS: No trend in risk of any fracture or of hip, forearm, or spine fractures was present with increasing doses or durations of treatment with vitamin A analogues. Subdividing vitamin A analogues into isotretinoin and acitretin did not change the results. CONCLUSION: Risk of fracture is not associated with vitamin A analogue treatment.
Notes
RefSource: Arch Dermatol. 2010 May;146(5):551-3
PubMed ID
20479294 View in PubMed
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Is a percentage a percentage? Systematic review of the effectiveness of Scandinavian behavioural modification smoking cessation programmes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97654
Source
Clin Respir J. 2010 Jan;4(1):3-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Peter Bo Poulsen
Jens Dollerup
Ann Merete Møller
Author Affiliation
Medical & Access, Pfizer ApS, Pfizer Denmark, Ballerup, Denmark. peterbo.poulsen@pfizer.com
Source
Clin Respir J. 2010 Jan;4(1):3-12
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Norway
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Male
Review Literature as Topic
Smoking - adverse effects
Smoking Cessation - methods - psychology
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Tobacco smoke is the leading preventable cause of death in the world. A total of 50% of all smokers will die from a smoking-related disease with a major impact upon quality of life and health-care costs. Tobacco-controlling policies, including smoking cessation, have increasingly been implemented across European countries. Reported effectiveness data on smoking cessation interventions are important for decision making. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to conduct a literature review on how the effectiveness (quit rates) of behavioural modification smoking cessation programmes (BMSCPs) - counselling, quitlines and quit-and-win contests - were analysed in Denmark, Sweden and Norway. METHODS: A systematic review was carried out by using the search engines Medline (U.S. National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD, USA), Cinahl (CINAHL Information Systems, EBSCO Industries, Ipswich, MA, USA), Embase (Elsevier, New York, NY, USA) and the grey literature. Following the Russell Standards, studies were selected according to design, analysis of data [intention-to-treat (ITT)/per protocol (PP)], documentation of abstinence and length of follow-up. Cochrane reviews of pharmacological studies were used as the benchmark. RESULTS: Although ITT analysis is the standard scientific approach advocated, most studies of BMSCPs reviewed were analysed by using the PP approach and were based on self-reported point prevalence estimates. This resulted in the reported 1-year quit rates between 16%-45% (PP) and 9%-23% (ITT). In contrast, pharmacological studies are conservative, as they are randomised, use ITT analysis and have continuous quit rates with biochemical verification of abstinence. Conclusion: This literature review reveals that quit rates of smoking cessation interventions are not always comparable. Scandinavian BMSCPs reported optimistic quit rates, confirmed by Cochrane literature review criteria. Care should be exercised when comparing smoking cessation interventions.
Notes
RefSource: Clin Respir J. 2010 Jan;4(1):1-2
PubMed ID
20298412 View in PubMed
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Long-term results using catheter-directed thrombolysis in 103 lower limbs with acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98791
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2010 Jan;39(1):112-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
N. Baekgaard
R. Broholm
S. Just
M. Jørgensen
L P Jensen
Author Affiliation
Vascular Clinic, Rigshospitalet and Gentofte, University of Copenhagen, Department of Vascular Surgery, Gentofte Hospital, Denmark. Baekgaard@dadlnet.dk
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2010 Jan;39(1):112-7
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anticoagulants - therapeutic use
Catheterization, Peripheral
Denmark
Female
Femoral Vein - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Fibrinolytic Agents - administration & dosage
Humans
Iliac Vein - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Infusions, Intravenous
Intermittent Pneumatic Compression Devices
Kaplan-Meiers Estimate
Lower Extremity - blood supply
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Stockings, Compression
Thrombolytic Therapy - adverse effects
Time Factors
Tissue Plasminogen Activator - administration & dosage
Treatment Outcome
Ultrasonography, Doppler, Color
Ultrasonography, Interventional
Vascular Patency
Venous Thrombosis - drug therapy - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The long-term outcome of catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) in patients with acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis (IFVT) is evaluated in this study. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients presenting for treatment with IFVT between June 1999 and May 2007 were considered for treatment using CDT. The following inclusion criteria were used: first episode of IFVT, age below 60 years, age of thrombus
Notes
RefSource: Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2010 Mar;39(3):373-4; author reply 374
PubMed ID
19879780 View in PubMed
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New-onset diabetes mellitus after kidney transplantation in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97988
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2010 Apr;5(4):709-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Mads Hornum
Kaj Anker Jørgensen
Jesper Melchior Hansen
Finn Thomsen Nielsen
Karl Bang Christensen
Elisabeth R Mathiesen
Bo Feldt-Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, P 2131, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. mads.hornum@rh.regionh.dk
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2010 Apr;5(4):709-16
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Glucose Intolerance - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Incidence
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Kidney Transplantation - adverse effects
Living Donors
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prediabetic State - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Uremia - complications - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to investigate the development of new-onset diabetes mellitus (NODM) in a prospective study of 97 nondiabetic uremic patients. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: Included were 57 kidney recipients (Tx group, age 39 +/- 13 years) and 40 uremic patients remaining on the waiting list for kidney transplantation (uremic controls, age 47 +/- 11 years). All were examined at baseline before possible transplantation and after 12 months. The prevalence of diabetes, prediabetes, insulin sensitivity index (ISI), and insulin secretion index (Isecr) were estimated using an oral glucose tolerance test with measurements of plasma glucose and plasma insulin. RESULTS: One year after transplantation NODM was present in 14% (8 of 57) compared with 5% (2 of 40) in the uremic control group (P = 0.01). ISI in the Tx group deteriorated from 6.8 +/- 3.9 before transplantation to 4.9 +/- 2.8 at 12 months after transplantation (P = 0.005), and a slight increase in Isecr from 37 +/- 19 to 46 +/- 22 (P = 0.02) was seen. No significant changes occurred in the uremic controls (ISI was 7.9 +/- 5 and 8.5 +/- 5, and Isecr was 31 +/- 17 and 28 +/- 15). Using multivariate ordinal logistic regression, pre-Tx ISI and age predicted NODM (odds ratios: 0.82, P = 0.01 and 1.06, P = 0.02, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: One year after kidney transplantation, NODM was present in 14% of patients. This was mainly caused by an increase in insulin resistance and was observed despite improvement in insulin secretion.
Notes
RefSource: Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2010 Apr;5(4):560-2
PubMed ID
20167685 View in PubMed
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Occupational Risk for Oral Cancer in Nordic Countries

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302444
Source
Anticancer Res. June 2017; 37 (6):3221-3228.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Laura Tarvainen
Juho Suojanen
Pentti Kyyronen
Christian Lindqvist
Jan Ivar Martinsen
Kristina Kjaerheim
Elsebeth Lynge
Par Sparen
Laufey Tryggvadottir
Elisabete Weiderpass
Eero Pukkala
Source
Anticancer Res. June 2017; 37 (6):3221-3228.
Date
2017
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Finland
Iceland
Norway
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult Sex Distribution Smoking / adverse effects Smoking / epidemiology Time Factors
Alcohol Drinking
Adverse effects
Epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Diagnosis
Mouth neoplasms
Occupational Diseases
Occupational Health
Occupations
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries
Abstract
Aim: To evaluate occupational risk for cancer of the tongue, oral cavity or pharynx after adjustment for alcohol and tobacco use.
Materials and methods: The data covered 14.9 million people and 28,623 cases of cancer of the tongue, oral cavity and pharynx in the Nordic countries 1961-2005. Alcohol consumption by occupation was estimated based on mortality from liver cirrhosis and incidence of liver cancer. Smoking by occupation was estimated based on the incidence of lung cancer.
Results: Only few occupations had relative risks of over 1.5 for cancer of the tongue, oral cavity and pharynx. These occupations included dentists, artistic workers, hairdressers, journalists, cooks and stewards, seamen and waiters.
Conclusion: Several occupational categories, including dentists, had an increased relative risk of tongue cancer. This new finding remains to be explained but could be related to occupational chemical exposures, increased consumption of alcohol and tobacco products, or infection with human papilloma virus.
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20 records – page 1 of 2.