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Cigarette smoking as a risk factor for sudden infant death syndrome: A population-based study

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59888
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1990 Jan;80(1):29-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1990
  1 website  
Author
Haglund, B
Cnattingius, S
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1990 Jan;80(1):29-32
Date
Jan-1990
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cause of Death
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Age
Parity
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sudden Infant Death - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
Risk factors for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) were examined in a prospective study based on Swedish births between 1983 and 1985. All infants surviving the first week of life were included (279,938). The overall rate of SIDS was 0.7 per 1,000 first week survivors. Elevated relative risks were associated with low maternal age, multiparity, maternal smoking, and male infants. Smoking doubled the risk and a clear dose-response relation by amount smoked was observed. Maternal smoking also seemed to influence the time of death, as infants of smokers died at an earlier age. In countries like Sweden, smoking may be the single most important preventable risk factor for sudden infant death syndrome.
Notes
Erratum In: Am J Public Health 1992 Nov;82(11):1489
PubMed ID
2293799 View in PubMed
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Community isoniazid prophylaxis program in an underdeveloped area of Alaska

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1020
Source
Public Health Reports. 1967 Dec; 82(12):1045-1056
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1967
  1 website  
Author
Hanson, M.L.
Comstock, G.W.
Haley, C.E.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Public Health Reports. 1967 Dec; 82(12):1045-1056
Date
Dec-1967
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Chemoprophylaxis
INH
PPD
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska
Child
Child, Preschool
Community Health Services
Ethnic Groups
Health education
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Isoniazid - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Public health nursing
Tuberculin Test
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Ideal conditions for the spread of tuberculosis are created by a gregarious population living in small, crowded dwellings with inadequate ventilation and minimal sanitary facilities. Given these circumstances, it is not surprising that Alaska experienced one of the worst tuberculosis epidemics ever recorded.To combat it, a committee headed by the former Surgeon General of the Public Health Service, Dr. Thomas Parran, was convened in 1953 to studythe situation and outline emergency measures. The tuberculosis control workers of the Alaska Department of Health and Welfare and the Public Health Service must be credited with effectively implementing these measures.
Notes
Alaska Medical Library - From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1748.
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1966 Jan;81(1):43-84955282
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1961 Jan;76:19-2413694948
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1962 Dec;77:1021-3213985571
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1962 Dec;86:810-2214022524
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1965 Jul;80:565-7214310580
Cites: Alaska Med. 1965 Mar;7:12-514291984
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 596.
PubMed ID
4966218 View in PubMed
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Consumption of soft drinks and hyperactivity, mental distress, and conduct problems among adolescents in Oslo, Norway

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80467
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2006 Oct;96(10):1815-1820
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
  1 website  
Author
Lien, L
Lien, N
Heyerdahl, S
Thoresen, M
Bjertness, E
Author Affiliation
Section for Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. lars.lien@medisin.uio.no
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2006 Oct;96(10):1815-1820
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Beverages - adverse effects
Conduct Disorder - epidemiology
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Psychomotor Agitation - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Sucrose - adverse effects
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: We examined whether high levels of consumption of sugar-containing soft drinks were associated with mental distress, hyperactivity, and conduct problems among adolescents. METHODS: A cross-sectional population-based survey was conducted with 10th-grade students in Oslo, Norway (n = 5498). We used the Hopkins Symptom Checklist and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire to assess mental health outcomes. RESULTS: There was a J-shaped dose-response relationship between soft drink consumption and mental distress, conduct problems, and total mental health difficulties score; that is, adolescents who did not consume soft drinks had higher scores (indicating worse symptoms) than those who consumed soft drinks at moderate levels but lower scores than those with high consumption levels. The relationship was linear for hyperactivity. In a logistic regression model, the association between soft drink consumption and mental health problems remained significant after adjustment for behavioral, social, and food-related variables. The highest adjusted odds ratios were observed for conduct problems among boys and girls who consumed 4 or more glasses of sugar-containing soft drinks per day. CONCLUSIONS: High consumption levels of sugar-containing soft drinks were associated with mental health problems among adolescents even after adjustment for possible confounders.
PubMed ID
17008578 View in PubMed
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Decreasing smoking prevalence during pregnancy in Sweden: The effect on small-for-gestational-age births

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59102
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1997 Mar;87(3):410-413
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
  1 website  
Author
Cnattingius, S
Haglund, B
Author Affiliation
Department of Cancer Epidemiology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1997 Mar;87(3):410-413
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Maternal Age
Odds Ratio
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study examined whether recent changes in smoking prevalence among pregnant women have affected risks of small-for-gestational-age births. METHODS: With data for all live single births in Sweden from 1983 through 1992 (n = 1048139), odds ratios [ORs] and attributable risks of small-for-gestational-age births were calculated for 1983 through 1985, 1986 through 1989, and 1990 through 1992. RESULTS: Daily smoking decreased from 29.4% in 1983 to 21.8% in 1992. For the three time periods, the odds ratios of small-for-gestational-age births by maternal smoking were almost identical: 1-9 cigarettes/day OR = 2.1 or 2.2; for > or = 10 cigarettes/day, OR = 2.8. The attributable risk of smoking for small-for-gestational-age births declined from 26.2% in 1983 through 1985 to 20.9% in 1990 through 1992. CONCLUSIONS: The findings point to a true decrease in tobacco exposure during pregnancy and a reduction in the attributable risk for small-for-gestational-age births.
PubMed ID
9096542 View in PubMed
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Does passive smoking in early pregnancy increase the risk of small-for-gestational-age infants?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58942
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1998 Oct;88(10):1523-1527
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
  1 website  
Author
Dejin-Karlsson, E
Hanson, BS
Ostergren, PO
Sjöberg, NO
Marsal, K
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1998 Oct;88(10):1523-1527
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Comparative Study
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Life Style
Male
Maternal Age
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study tested the hypothesis that women who deliver small-for-gestational-age infants are more often exposed to passive smoking at home or at work. METHODS: Among a 1-year cohort of nulliparous women in the city of Malmö, Sweden 872 (87.7%) women completed a questionnaire during their first prenatal visit. The study was carried out among women whose pregnancies resulted in a singleton live birth (n = 826), 6.7% of infants were classified as small for their gestational age. RESULTS: Passive smoking in early pregnancy was shown to double a woman's risk of delivering a small-for-gestational-age infant, independent of potential confounding factors such as age, height, weight, nationality, educational level, and the mother's own active smoking (odds ratio [OR] = 2.7). A stratified analysis indicated interactional effects of maternal smoking and passive smoking on relative small-for-gestational-age risk. CONCLUSIONS: Based on an attributable risk estimate, a considerable reduction in the incidence of small-for-gestational-age births could be reached if pregnant women were not exposed to passive smoking.
PubMed ID
9772856 View in PubMed
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Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1998 Oct;88(10):1481-1483
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
  1 website  
Author
Forsén, L
Bjartveit, K
Bjørndal, A
Edna, TH
Meyer, HE
Schei, B
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. lisa.forsen@samfunnsmed.uio.no
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1998 Oct;88(10):1481-1483
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Population Surveillance
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to examine the reversibility of the effect of smoking on hip fracture incidence rates. METHODS: A 3-year follow-up cohort study was conducted involving 35,767 adults 50 years of age or older. Of these individuals, 421 suffered a hip fracture. RESULTS: Among participants less than 75 years of age, the relative risk (RR) of hip fracture was elevated for ex-smokers, even for those who had quit smoking more than 5 years previously (men: RR = 4.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2, 15.3; women: RR = 1.3, 95% CI = 0.6, 3.0), but was not as high as that for current smokers (men: RR = 5.0, 95% CI = 1.5, 16.9; women: RR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.2, 3.1). CONCLUSIONS: The effect of smoking on risk of hip fracture was not reversed completely 5 years after smoking cessation.
PubMed ID
9772848 View in PubMed
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High-risk occupations for breast cancer in the Swedish female working population

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21005
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1999 Jun;89(6):875-881
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
  1 website  
Author
Pollán, M
Gustavsson, P
Author Affiliation
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, National Centre for Epidemiology, Carlos III Institute of Health, Madrid, Spain. mpollan@isciii.es
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1999 Jun;89(6):875-881
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Linear Models
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Women, Working
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to estimate, for the period 1971 through 1989, occupation-specific risks of breast cancer among Swedish women employed in 1970. METHODS: Age-period standardized incidence ratios were computed. Log-linear Poisson models were fitted, with geographical area and town size taken into account. Risks were further adjusted for major occupational group, used as a proxy for socioeconomic status. Risk estimators were also calculated for women reporting the same occupation in 1960 and 1970. RESULTS: Most elevated risks among professionals, managers, and clerks were reduced when intragroup comparisons were carried out, indicating the confounding effect of socioeconomic status. Excess risks were found for pharmacists, teachers of theoretical subjects, schoolmasters, systems analysts and programmers, telephone operators, telegraph and radio operators, metal platers and coaters, and hairdressers and beauticians, as well as for women working in 1960 and 1970 as physicians, religious workers, social workers, bank tellers, cost accountants, and telephonists. CONCLUSIONS: While the high risks observed among professional, administrative, and clerical workers might be related to lower birth rates and increased case detection, excess risks found for telephone workers and for hairdressers and beauticians deserve further attention.
PubMed ID
10358678 View in PubMed
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Human biomonitoring to optimize fish consumption advice

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4439
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2005 Aug;95(8):1304; author reply 1304-1305
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
  1 website  
Author
Knobeloch, L
Anderson, HA
Author Affiliation
Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services, Madison
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2005 Aug;95(8):1304; author reply 1304-1305
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Animals
Environmental monitoring
Female
Fishes
Humans
Mercury Poisoning - etiology
Nutrition Policy
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - chemically induced
Public Health
Risk assessment
Seafood - adverse effects - analysis - poisoning
United States
United States Environmental Protection Agency
United States Food and Drug Administration
Abstract
The public is confused and concerned about the quality of the fish it eats. People worry about chemicals that can accumulate in their bodies. Telling worried people not to worry is seldom an effective risk communication strategy. Unless clear fish consumption guidelines are issued by credible federal and local agencies, the public is likely to respond by avoiding all fish.
Notes
Comment On: American Journal of Public Health. 2005 Mar;95(3):393-397
PubMed ID
16006410 View in PubMed
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Human biomonitoring to optimize fish consumption advice: Reducing uncertainty when evaluating benefits and risks

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3086
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2005 Mar;95(3):393-397
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
  1 website  
Author
Arnold, SM
Lynn, TV
Verbrugge, LA
Middaugh, JP
Author Affiliation
Alaska Division of Public Health, Section of Epidemiology, 3601 C St, Ste 540, PO Box 240249 Anchorage, AK 99524-0249, USA. scott_arnold@health.state.ak.us
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2005 Mar;95(3):393-397
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Animals
Chemistry, Analytical - trends
Counseling - standards
Environmental Monitoring - methods - standards
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects - poisoning
Female
Fishes
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Mass Screening
Mercury Poisoning - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Methylmercury Compounds - adverse effects - analysis - poisoning
Middle Aged
No-Observed-Adverse-Effect Level
Nutrition - education
Nutrition Policy - trends
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Public Health - standards - trends
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Seafood - adverse effects - analysis - poisoning
Uncertainty
United States
United States Environmental Protection Agency
United States Food and Drug Administration
Abstract
National fish consumption advisories that are based solely on assessment of risk of exposure to contaminants without consideration of consumption benefits result in overly restrictive advice that discourages eating fish even in areas where such advice is unwarranted. In fact, generic fish advisories may have adverse public health consequences because of decreased fish consumption and substitution of foods that are less healthy. Public health is on the threshold of a new era for determining actual exposures to environmental contaminants, owing to technological advances in analytical chemistry. It is now possible to target fish consumption advice to specific at-risk populations by evaluating individual contaminant exposures and health risk factors. Because of the current epidemic of nutritionally linked disease, such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, general recommendations for limiting fish consumption are ill conceived and potentially dangerous.
Notes
Comment In: American Journal of Public Health. 2005 Aug;95(8):1304; author reply 1304-1305
PubMed ID
15727965 View in PubMed
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Interior surface materials in the home and the development of bronchial obstruction in young children in Oslo, Norway

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33500
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1999 Feb;89(2):188-192
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
  1 website  
Author
Jaakkola, JJ
Oie, L
Nafstad, P
Botten, G
Samuelsen, SO
Magnus, P
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Health Sciences, National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1999 Feb;89(2):188-192
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bronchial Diseases - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Child, Preschool
Constriction, Pathologic - etiology
Construction Materials - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Floors and Floorcoverings
Follow-Up Studies
Housing
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Interior Design and Furnishings
Logistic Models
Norway
Odds Ratio
Polyvinyl Chloride - adverse effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Textiles - adverse effects
Urban health
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the role of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastics and textile materials in the home in the development of bronchial obstruction during the first 2 years of life. METHODS: The study was a matched pair case-control study based on a cohort of 3754 newborns in Oslo in 1992 and 1993 who were followed up for 2 years. The case group consisted of 251 children with bronchial obstruction; the control group was matched one-to-one for date of birth. RESULTS: In conditional logistic regression analysis, the risk of bronchial obstruction was related to the presence of PVC flooring (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.89; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.14, 3.14) and textile wall materials (adjusted OR = 1.58; 95% CI = 0.98, 2.54). The reference category was wood or parquet flooring and painted walls and ceiling. Further analysis revealed an exposure-response relationship between the assessed amount of PVC and other plasticizer-containing surface materials and the risk of bronchial obstruction. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides new evidence of the role of PVC and textile wall materials in the development of bronchial obstruction in young children.
PubMed ID
9949747 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.