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Absence of an environmental effect on the recurrence of facial-cleft defects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35236
Source
N Engl J Med. 1995 Jul 20;333(3):161-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-20-1995
Author
K. Christensen
M M Schmidt
M. Vaeth
J. Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Epidemiology Science Center research unit, Steno Institute of Public Health, Aarhus.
Source
N Engl J Med. 1995 Jul 20;333(3):161-4
Date
Jul-20-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cleft Lip - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Cleft Palate - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Paternity
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND. The rate of recurrence of a broad range of birth defects may decrease among women who change residence after the birth of their first infant. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of changing residence on the recurrence of congenital facial-cleft defects. METHODS. We identified 4189 women who had infants with facial-cleft defects by linking a data base comprising the records of children with facial clefts born between 1952 and 1987 with the Central Person Registry in Denmark. Among the 4189 mothers, 1902 each had additional children after the first child with a facial-cleft defect. A total of 2692 younger siblings were identified. We compared the proportion of infants with facial-cleft defects among the younger siblings between mothers who had changed municipalities or sexual partners and those who had not. RESULTS. Changing the municipality of residence did not decrease the frequency with which facial-cleft defects recurred in younger siblings. Among the 907 infants of mothers who changed municipalities but not partners, 29 (3.2 percent) had facial-cleft defects, as compared with 48 (3.4 percent) of 1425 infants of mothers who changed neither municipality nor partner (relative risk, 0.9; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.6 to 1.5). However, a change of partner reduced the recurrence risk significantly. Among 236 infants of mothers who changed partners, 1 (0.4 percent) had a facial-cleft defect, as compared with 77 (3.3 percent) of 2350 infants of mothers who did not change partners (relative risk, 0.1; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.02 to 0.9). CONCLUSIONS. Recurrence of facial-cleft defects is not linked to the residence of the mother, but having a different partner reduced a woman's risk of having a second child with this defect.
PubMed ID
7791818 View in PubMed
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Admission for and mortality from primary venous thromboembolism in women of fertile age in Denmark, 1977-95.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200765
Source
BMJ. 1999 Sep 25;319(7213):820-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-1999
Author
L. Mellemkjaer
H T Sørensen
L. Dreyer
J. Olsen
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, DK-2 100 Copenhagen O, Denmark. lene@cancer.dk
Source
BMJ. 1999 Sep 25;319(7213):820-1
Date
Sep-25-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Contraceptives, Oral - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Survival Rate
Thromboembolism - mortality - therapy
Venous Thrombosis - mortality - therapy
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 1995 Dec 16;346(8990):1575-827500748
Cites: Lancet. 1995 Dec 16;346(8990):1589-937500750
Cites: BMJ. 1996 Jan 13;312(7023):83-88555935
Cites: Lancet. 1996 Aug 10;348(9024):401-28709744
Cites: Lancet. 1996 Aug 10;348(9024):4028709745
Comment In: BMJ. 1999 Sep 25;319(7213):795-610496802
PubMed ID
10496825 View in PubMed
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Adult and prenatal exposures to tobacco smoke as risk indicators of fertility among 430 Danish couples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203830
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1998 Nov 15;148(10):992-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1998
Author
T K Jensen
T B Henriksen
N H Hjollund
T. Scheike
H. Kolstad
A. Giwercman
E. Ernst
J P Bonde
N E Skakkebaek
J. Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Growth and Reproduction, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1998 Nov 15;148(10):992-7
Date
Nov-15-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fertility - drug effects
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Menstrual Cycle - drug effects
Odds Ratio
Paternal Exposure - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Semen - drug effects
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Abstract
During 1992-1995, 430 Danish couples were recruited after a nationwide mailing of a letter to 52,255 trade union members who were 20-35 years old, lived with a partner, and had no children. The couples were enrolled into the study when they discontinued birth control, and they were followed for six menstrual cycles or until a clinically recognized pregnancy. At enrollment and each month throughout the follow-up, both partners completed a questionnaire that asked them about their smoking, alcohol consumption, and intake of caffeinated beverages. The effect of current smoking and smoking exposure in utero was evaluated by using a logistic regression model with pregnancy outcome of each cycle in a Cox discrete model calculating the fecundability odds ratio. After adjustment for female body mass index and alcohol intake, diseases in female reproductive organs, semen quality, and duration of menstrual cycle, the fecundability odds ratio for smoking women exposed in utero was 0.53 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.31-0.91) compared with unexposed nonsmokers. Fecundability odds ratio for nonsmoking women exposed in utero was 0.70 (95% CI 0.48-1.03) and that for female smokers not exposed in utero was 0.67 (95% CI 0.42-1.06). Exposure in utero was also associated with a decreased fecundability odds ratio in males (0.68, 95% CI 0.48-0.97), whereas present smoking did not reduce fecundability significantly. It seems advisable to encourage smoking cessation prior to the attempt to conceive as well as during pregnancy.
PubMed ID
9829871 View in PubMed
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Antidepressant medications and risk for cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20211
Source
Epidemiology. 2000 Mar;11(2):171-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
S O Dalton
C. Johansen
L. Mellemkjaer
H T Sørensen
J K McLaughlin
J. Olsen
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen.
Source
Epidemiology. 2000 Mar;11(2):171-6
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects
Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - chemically induced
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Pharmacoepidemiology
Poisson Distribution
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Antidepressants appear to promote tumor growth in experimental studies; however, results from epidemiologic studies are inconclusive. We used a population-based cohort study to estimate the incidence of cancer after antidepressant treatment in 39,807 adult users of antidepressants identified in the Prescription Database of the County of North Jutland, Denmark between January 1, 1989 and December 31, 1995. Information on cancer occurrence was obtained from the Danish Cancer Registry. We categorized exposure according to use of tricyclic antidepressants, tetracyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or monoamine oxidase inhibitors. In the follow-up period beginning 1 year after first known prescription, there were 966 cancers among users of antidepressants; our population estimate suggested an expected number of 946 for an overall standardized incidence ratio of 1.0 (95% confidence interval = 1.0-1.1). Users of tricyclic antidepressants had an excess of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, with the risk increasing with the number of prescriptions of tricyclic antidepressants. The standardized incidence ratio was 2.5 (95% confidence interval, 1.4-4.2) for those with five or more prescriptions. Our results provide little evidence that antidepressants promote cancer at other sites, except for a possible effect of tricyclic antidepressants and tetracyclic antidepressants on non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
PubMed ID
11021615 View in PubMed
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Caffeine intake and delayed conception: a European multicenter study on infertility and subfecundity. European Study Group on Infertility Subfecundity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11090
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1997 Feb 15;145(4):324-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-1997
Author
F. Bolúmar
J. Olsen
M. Rebagliato
L. Bisanti
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Alicante University, Spain.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1997 Feb 15;145(4):324-34
Date
Feb-15-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Caffeine - adverse effects
Central Nervous System Stimulants - adverse effects
Coffee - adverse effects
Diet Surveys
Europe
Female
Humans
Infertility, Female - etiology
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Proportional Hazards Models
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Time Factors
Abstract
The effects of caffeine consumption on delayed conception were evaluated in a European multicenter study on risk factors of infertility. Information was collected retrospectively on time of unprotected intercourse for the first pregnancy and the most recent waiting time episode in a randomly selected sample of 3,187 women aged 25-44 years from five European countries (Denmark, Germany, Italy, Poland, and Spain) between August 1991 and February 1993. The consumption of caffeinated beverages at the beginning of the waiting time was used to estimate daily caffeine intake, which was categorized as 0-100, 101-300, 301-500, and > or = 501 mg. Risk of subfecundity (> or = 9.5 months) and the fecundability ratio, respectively, were assessed by logistic regression and Cox proportional hazard analyses, adjusting for age, parity, smoking, alcohol consumption, frequency of intercourse, educational level, working status, use of oral contraceptives, and country. A significantly increased odds ratio (OR) of 1.45 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-2.04) for subfecundity in the first pregnancy was observed for women drinking more than 500 mg of caffeine per day, the effect being relatively stronger in smokers (OR = 1.56, 95% CI 0.92-2.63) than in nonsmokers (OR = 1.38, 95% CI 0.85-2.23). Women in the highest level of consumption had an increase in the time leading to the first pregnancy of 11% (hazard ratio = 0.90, 95% CI 0.78-1.03). These associations were observed consistently in all countries as well as for the most recent waiting time episode. The authors conclude that high levels of caffeine intake may delay conception among fertile women.
PubMed ID
9054236 View in PubMed
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Caffeine intake and fecundability: a follow-up study among 430 Danish couples planning their first pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205390
Source
Reprod Toxicol. 1998 May-Jun;12(3):289-95
Publication Type
Article
Author
T K Jensen
T B Henriksen
N H Hjollund
T. Scheike
H. Kolstad
A. Giwercman
E. Ernst
J P Bonde
N E Skakkebaek
J. Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Growth and Reproduction, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Reprod Toxicol. 1998 May-Jun;12(3):289-95
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Caffeine - adverse effects
Denmark
Family Planning Services
Female
Fertility - drug effects
Fertilization - drug effects
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Fecundability has been defined as the ability to achieve a recognized pregnancy. Several studies on caffeine and fecundability have been conducted but have been inconclusive. This may be explained partly by lack of stratification by smoking. Furthermore, few researchers have tried to separate the effect of caffeine from different sources (coffee, tea, cola, and chocolate). Clearly, the relationship between caffeine and fecundability needs further research, given the high prevalence of caffeine intake among women of childbearing age. We examined the independent and combined effects of smoking and caffeine intake from different sources on the probability of conception. From 1992 to 1995, a total of 430 couples were recruited after a nationwide mailing of a personal letter to 52,255 trade union members who were 20 to 35 years old, lived with a partner, and had no previous reproductive experience. At enrollment and in six cycles of follow-up, both partners filled out a questionnaire on different factors including smoking habits and their intake of coffee, tea, chocolate, cola beverages, and chocolate bars. In all, 1596 cycles and 423 couples were included in the analyses. The cycle-specific association between caffeine intake and fecundability was analyzed in a logistic regression model with the outcome at each cycle (pregnant or not pregnant) in a Cox discrete model calculating the fecundability odds-ratio (FR). Compared to nonsmoking women with caffeine intake less than 300 mg/d, nonsmoking women who consumed 300 to 700 mg/d caffeine had a FR of 0.88 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.60-1.31], whereas women with a higher caffeine intake had a FR = 0.63 (95% CI 0.25-1.60) after adjusting for female body mass index and alcohol intake, diseases of the female reproductive organs, semen quality, and duration of menstrual cycle. No dose-response relationship was found among smokers. Among males, the same decline in point estimates of the FR was present. Smoking women whose only source of caffeine was coffee (>300 mg/d) had a reduced fecundability odds-ratio (FR = 0.34; 95% CI 0.12-0.98). An interaction between caffeine and smoking is biologically plausible, and the lack of effect among smokers may be due to faster metabolism of caffeine. Our findings suggest that especially nonsmoking women who wish to achieve a pregnancy might benefit from a reduced caffeine intake.
PubMed ID
9628552 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence in the Danish reinforced plastics industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24248
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1993;(127):301-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
H A Kolstad
E. Lynge
J. Olsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, University of Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1993;(127):301-8
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hodgkin Disease - chemically induced - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Leukemia - chemically induced - epidemiology
Male
Multiple Myeloma - chemically induced - epidemiology
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Plastics - adverse effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Increased occurrences of malignancies of the lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues have been reported from industries in which employees are potentially exposed to styrene. The aim of the study reported here was to describe cancer incidence in the reinforced plastics industry in Denmark. A total of 64,000 employees of 552 Danish companies assessed to have produced reinforced plastics at any time since the 1960s were identified from a public administrative registry of all Danish employers and wage earners. Cancer incidence in the population was compared with similar rates for the population at large. No excess risk for all neoplasms was observed. Among male employees, increased risks were found for cancer of the lung (396 cases; relative risk [RR], 1.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.27), of the pleura (20 cases; RR, 2.33; 1.42-3.60), of the nasal cavities (nine cases; RR, 1.55; 0.71-2.94), of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (61 cases; RR, 1.27; 0.97-1.63) and for leukaemia (61 cases; RR, 1.15; 0.88-1.48). Among female employees, a reduced risk for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was observed (one case; RR, 0.16; 0.00-0.88). Some support was thus found for previous reports of increased risk for respiratory cancers and for malignancies of the lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues. The results must be interpreted with caution, however, owing to shortcomings in the design of the study.
PubMed ID
8070877 View in PubMed
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Cancer mortality among man-made vitreous fiber production workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22108
Source
Epidemiology. 1997 May;8(3):259-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
P. Boffetta
R. Saracci
A. Andersen
P A Bertazzi
J. Chang-Claude
J. Cherrie
G. Ferro
R. Frentzel-Beyme
J. Hansen
J. Olsen
N. Plato
L. Teppo
P. Westerholm
P D Winter
C. Zocchetti
Author Affiliation
International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
Source
Epidemiology. 1997 May;8(3):259-68
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Mineral Fibers - adverse effects
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Occupational Diseases - etiology - mortality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
We have updated the follow-up of cancer mortality for a cohort study of man-made vitreous fiber production workers from Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden, United Kingdom, Germany, and Italy, from 1982 to 1990. In the mortality analysis, 22,002 production workers contributed 489,551 person-years, during which there were 4,521 deaths. Workers with less than 1 year of employment had an increased mortality [standardized mortality ratio (SMR) = 1.45; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.37-1.53]. Workers with 1 year or more of employment, contributing 65% of person-years, had an SMR of 1.05 (95% CI = 1.02-1.09). The SMR for lung cancer was 1.34 (95% CI = 1.08-1.63, 97 deaths) among rock/slag wool workers and 1.27 (95% CI = 1.07-1.50, 140 deaths) among glass wool workers. In the latter group, no increase was present when local mortality rates were used. Among rock/slag wool workers, the risk of lung cancer increased with time-since-first-employment and duration of employment. The trend in lung cancer mortality according to technologic phase at first employment was less marked than in the previous follow-up. We obtained similar results from a Poisson regression analysis limited to rock/slag wool workers. Five deaths from pleural mesothelioma were reported, which may not represent an excess. There was no apparent excess for other categories of neoplasm. Tobacco smoking and other factors linked to social class, as well as exposures in other industries, appear unlikely to explain the whole increase in lung cancer mortality among rock/slag wool workers. Limited data on other agents do not indicate an important role of asbestos, slag, or bitumen. These results are not sufficient to conclude that the increased lung cancer risk is the result of exposure to rock/slag wool; however, insofar as respirable fibers were an important component of the ambient pollution of the working environment, they may have contributed to the increased risk.
Notes
Comment In: Epidemiology. 1998 Mar;9(2):218-9; author reply 219-209504299
Comment In: Epidemiology. 1998 Mar;9(2):218; author reply 214-209504298
PubMed ID
9115020 View in PubMed
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Cancer risk in users of calcium channel blockers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22102
Source
Hypertension. 1997 May;29(5):1091-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
J H Olsen
H T Sørensen
S. Friis
J K McLaughlin
F H Steffensen
G L Nielsen
M. Andersen
J F Fraumeni
J. Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Division for Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen, Denmark. jorgen@cancer.dk
Source
Hypertension. 1997 May;29(5):1091-4
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Calcium Channel Blockers - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
Ca2+ channel blockers may cause cancer by inhibiting apoptosis or reducing intracellular Ca2+ in certain tissues. Recent findings suggest that drug users are at increased risk for cancer in general and for colon cancer in particular. We conducted a study in one Danish county of 17911 patients who received at least one prescription of Ca2+ channel blockers between 1 January 1991 and 31 December 1993. The patients were identified from records in the National Health Insurance Program, which refunds part of the price of such drugs. Cancer occurrence and rate were determined by use of the files of the Danish Cancer Registry and compared with county-specific incidence rates for various categories of cancer. During the follow-up period of up to 3 years, 412 cancers were observed among users of Ca2+ channel blockers, compared with 414 expected, to yield an age- and sex-standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of 1.00 (95% confidence interval, 0.90 to 1.10). There was no indication of an excess risk in the subgroup of likely long-term users or users of specific drugs. The SIR of colon cancer, a site of a priori interest, was 0.8 (95% confidence interval, 0.5 to 1.1) on the basis of 34 cases. Although the results are reassuring, the lack of association could reflect the relatively short follow-up after registration in the prescription database. Continued monitoring of cancer risk is planned.
Notes
Comment In: Hypertension. 1997 Dec;30(6):1641-29403598
Comment In: Hypertension. 1997 Dec;30(6):1641; author reply 16429403597
PubMed ID
9149671 View in PubMed
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62 records – page 1 of 7.