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Affective lability mediates the association between childhood trauma and suicide attempts, mixed episodes and co-morbid anxiety disorders in bipolar disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287299
Source
Psychol Med. 2017 Apr;47(5):902-912
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
M. Aas
C. Henry
F. Bellivier
M. Lajnef
S. Gard
J-P Kahn
T V Lagerberg
S R Aminoff
T. Bjella
M. Leboyer
O A Andreassen
I. Melle
B. Etain
Source
Psychol Med. 2017 Apr;47(5):902-912
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Adverse Events - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Age of Onset
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology
Comorbidity
Female
France - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Many studies have shown associations between a history of childhood trauma and more severe or complex clinical features of bipolar disorders (BD), including suicide attempts and earlier illness onset. However, the psychopathological mechanisms underlying these associations are still unknown. Here, we investigated whether affective lability mediates the relationship between childhood trauma and the severe clinical features of BD.
A total of 342 participants with BD were recruited from France and Norway. Diagnosis and clinical characteristics were assessed using the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS) or the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders (SCID-I). Affective lability was measured using the short form of the Affective Lability Scale (ALS-SF). A history of childhood trauma was assessed using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). Mediation analyses were performed using the SPSS process macro.
Using the mediation model and covariation for the lifetime number of major mood episodes, affective lability was found to statistically mediate the relationship between childhood trauma experiences and several clinical variables, including suicide attempts, mixed episodes and anxiety disorders. No significant mediation effects were found for rapid cycling or age at onset.
Our data suggest that affective lability may represent a psychological dimension that mediates the association between childhood traumatic experiences and the risk of a more severe or complex clinical expression of BD.
PubMed ID
27894372 View in PubMed
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Childhood adversities and chronic conditions: examination of mediators, recall bias and age at diagnosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294581
Source
Int J Public Health. 2018 Mar; 63(2):181-192
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Mashhood Ahmed Sheikh
Author Affiliation
Health Services Research Unit, Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, 9037, Tromsø, Norway. mashhood.a.sheikh@uit.no.
Source
Int J Public Health. 2018 Mar; 63(2):181-192
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Adult Survivors of Child Adverse Events - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Age of Onset
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bias
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Poverty
Risk factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to (1) identify the influence of childhood socioeconomic status (CSES) on five chronic conditions: asthma, bronchitis, hypothyroid, migraine, and psychiatric disorders in later life; (2) determine the mediating role of childhood abuse (CA) in these associations, and (3) quantify recall bias due to respondent's mental health in these associations.
10,325 men and women from the Tromsø Study were followed for 13 years, and Poisson regression models were used.
Low CSES was associated with a 16-23% higher risk of chronic conditions, and CA was associated with a 16-58% higher risk of chronic conditions (p 
Notes
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PubMed ID
28736801 View in PubMed
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Childhood adversities predict strongly the use of psychotropic drugs in adulthood: a population-based cohort study of 24,284 Finns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268779
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2015 Apr;69(4):354-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Karoliina Koskenvuo
Markku Koskenvuo
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2015 Apr;69(4):354-60
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Adverse Events - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Cohort Studies
Divorce - psychology
Family Health
Family Relations - psychology
Fear - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Poverty - psychology
Psychotropic Drugs - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Exposure to adverse childhood experiences has been shown to be associated with negative health outcomes including mental health problems, but only a few studies with register-based data have used psychotropic drugs as an outcome variable. The purpose of this study is to examine whether adverse emotional childhood experiences, such as serious conflicts in the family and frequent fear of a family member, predict the use of psychotropic drugs in adulthood. In addition, the association of a child-parent relationship during childhood with the use of psychotropic drugs is studied.
The participants of the population-based Health and Social Support Study (24,284 working aged Finns) were followed up for 9 years. The information on childhood experiences and child-parent relationships was obtained from the questionnaires in 1998 and 2003. The number of psychotropic purchases (antipsychotics, drugs for bipolar disorder, antidepressants, anxiolytics, hypnotics and sedatives) was obtained from the National-Drug-Prescription-Register. Logistic and multinomial regression models were used.
A graded association between childhood adversities and the use of psychotropic drugs was found, even after adjustments for occupational training, work status, recent life events and health behaviour. Frequent fear of a family member showed the strongest association: the OR for multiple use of antidepressants was 3.08 (95% CI 2.72 to 3.49) and 2.69 (2.27 to 3.20) for multiple use of anxiolytics. Use of psychotropic drugs was clearly increased among those with poor child-parent relationship and multiple childhood adversities.
The results highlight the effect of environmental factors during childhood on mental health and the need for early recognition of families at risk.
PubMed ID
25538256 View in PubMed
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Depressed suicide attempters with posttraumatic stress disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268521
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2015;19(1):48-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Maria Ramberg
Barbara Stanley
Mette Ystgaard
Lars Mehlum
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2015;19(1):48-59
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Adult Survivors of Child Adverse Events - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology - psychology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Posttraumatic stress disorder and major depressive disorder are well-established risk factors for suicidal behavior. This study compared depressed suicide attempters with and without comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder with respect to additional diagnoses, global functioning, depressive symptoms, substance abuse, history of traumatic exposure, and suicidal behavior. Adult patients consecutively admitted to a general hospital after a suicide attempt were interviewed and assessed for DSM-IV diagnosis and clinical correlates. Sixty-four patients (71%) were diagnosed with depression; of them, 21 patients (32%) had posttraumatic stress disorder. There were no group differences in social adjustment, depressive symptoms, or suicidal intent. However, the group with comorbid depression and posttraumatic stress disorder had more additional Axis I diagnoses, a higher degree of childhood trauma exposure, and more often reported previous suicide attempts, non-suicidal self-harm, and vengeful suicidal motives. These findings underline the clinical importance of diagnosis and treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder in suicide attempters.
PubMed ID
25058681 View in PubMed
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Economic stress in childhood and suicide thoughts and suicide attempts: a population-based study among adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296969
Source
Public Health. 2018 Oct; 163:42-45
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2018
Author
M Lindström
M Rosvall
Author Affiliation
Social Medicine and Health Policy, Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, S-205 02 Malmö, Sweden. Electronic address: martin.lindstrom@med.lu.se.
Source
Public Health. 2018 Oct; 163:42-45
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Adverse Events - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Poverty - psychology
Prevalence
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Suicidal ideation
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate associations between economic stress in childhood and suicide thoughts and attempts.
The 2012 public health survey in Scania, Sweden, is a cross-sectional postal questionnaire study including 28,029 participants, aged 18-80 years.
Associations were analyzed in logistic regressions.
A 12.1% prevalence of men and 15.5% of women had ever experienced suicide thoughts, while 3.2% of men and 5.3% of women had experienced suicide attempt. Roughly 24% had experienced less severe and 8% severe economic problems in childhood. Significant associations between economic stress in childhood and suicide thoughts and attempts remained throughout the age-adjusted and multiple adjusted analyses.
Economic stress in childhood is associated with self-reported suicide thoughts and suicide attempts in an adult general population.
PubMed ID
30059807 View in PubMed
Less detail

Impact of childhood adversities on depression in early adulthood: A longitudinal cohort study of 478,141 individuals in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290855
Source
J Affect Disord. 2017 12 01; 223:95-100
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-01-2017
Author
Emma Björkenstam
Bo Vinnerljung
Anders Hjern
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Social Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Community Health Sciences, Fielding School of Public Health and California Center for Population Research, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States. Electronic address: emma.bjorkenstam@ki.se.
Source
J Affect Disord. 2017 12 01; 223:95-100
Date
12-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Adverse Events - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Although the relationship between childhood adversity (CA) and depression is widely accepted, there is little information on what proportion of depression is attributable to CA.
We used a Swedish cohort of 478,141 individuals born in 1984-1988 in Sweden. Register-based CA indicators included parental death, parental substance abuse and psychiatric morbidity, parental criminality, parental separation, public assistance recipiency, child welfare intervention, and residential instability. Estimates of risk of depression, measured as retrieval of prescribed antidepressants and/or psychiatric care with a clinical diagnosis of depression, between 2006 and 2012 were calculated as Hazard Ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), using a Cox regression analysis.
All CAs predicted depression in early adulthood. Furthermore, the predictive association between the CA indicators and depression was graded, with highest HRs observed for 4+ CAs (HR: 3.05 (95% CI 2.83-3.29)) for a clinical diagnosis for depression and HR: 1.32 (95% CI 1.25-1.41) for antidepressant medication after adjustments were made for important confounding factors. Of the studied CAs, child welfare intervention entailed highest HR for depression.
Regardless of causality issues, children and youth with a history of multiple CA should be regarded as a high-risk group for depression by professionals in social, and health services that come into contact with this group.
Notes
ErratumIn: J Affect Disord. 2017 Dec 7;: PMID 29224714
PubMed ID
28735168 View in PubMed
Less detail

Job Demands and Job Control as Predictors of Depressive Symptoms: Moderating Effects of Negative Childhood Socioemotional Experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281422
Source
Stress Health. 2016 Oct;32(4):383-394
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Laura Pulkki-Råback
Marko Elovainio
Marianna Virtanen
Mika Kivimäki
Mirka Hintsanen
Taina Hintsa
Markus Jokela
Sampsa Puttonen
Matti Joensuu
Jari Lipsanen
Olli T Raitakari
Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen
Source
Stress Health. 2016 Oct;32(4):383-394
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Adverse Events - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Depression - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
There have been calls to know more about vulnerability factors that may predispose to adverse health outcomes at work. We examined if childhood adverse experiences would affect vulnerability to psychosocial stress factors at work. A nationally representative sample of 1546 Finnish men and women was followed up from childhood to adulthood. Childhood adverse experiences consisted of socioeconomic and emotional factors. Job demands and job control were measured 21?years later, and depressive symptoms were measured 21 and 27?years after the childhood measurements. Job demands predicted depressive symptoms over 6?years, and the association was modified by childhood emotional adversity. Participants with three or more emotional adversities in childhood had more depressive symptoms in response to high job demands compared with participants with zero or one emotional adversities in childhood (Betas?=?-1.40 and -2.01, ps?
PubMed ID
25641815 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.