Skip header and navigation

Refine By

67 records – page 1 of 7.

Abused women's vulnerability in daily life and in contact with psychiatric care: In the light of a caring science perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286928
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2017 Aug;26(15-16):2384-2391
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Karin Örmon
Ulrica Hörberg
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2017 Aug;26(15-16):2384-2391
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology
Battered Women - psychology
Behavioral Sciences
Clinical Studies as Topic
Female
Humans
Mental Disorders - nursing - psychology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Sweden
Vulnerable Populations - psychology
Women's health
Abstract
The aim of the study is to deepen the understanding of abused women's vulnerability in relation to how the abuse and encounters with health care professionals affect life. A further aim is to highlight abused women's vulnerability with a caring science perspective.
Experience of abuse has consequences for the mental health of women and girls. Abused women may experience health care as unsupportive, and as a result, often chose not to disclose their experiences of abuse.
The results of two qualitative empirical studies were analysed along with a phenomenological meaning analysis in accordance with the methodological principles of Reflective Lifeworld Research.
Living one's life with experiences of abuse implies vulnerability, which can prevent abused women from achieving good health. This vulnerability results from insecurity regarding identity, along with the sense that one could have been a different individual if it were not for the abuse and thereby have a more fair chance in life. Being cared for within general psychiatric care could further increase this vulnerability. The healthcare professional's ability to care for the women who have experienced abuse leads to either an encounter of trust or else further suffering for the women.
A lifeworld-oriented caring science perspective as a foundation for care can contribute to care for abused women which reaches the existential dimensions of their vulnerability and vulnerable life situation.
It is evident that healthcare professionals should deepen their understanding of how abused women live, within a general psychiatric context. This study enables a deeper understanding of abused women's vulnerability in relation to how the abuse and encounters with healthcare professionals affect life.
PubMed ID
27349375 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adult Victimization in Female Survivors of Childhood Violence and Abuse: The Contribution of Multiple Types of Violence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297548
Source
Violence Against Women. 2017 11; 23(13):1601-1619
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-2017
Author
Helene Flood Aakvaag
Siri Thoresen
Tore Wentzel-Larsen
Grete Dyb
Author Affiliation
1 Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Violence Against Women. 2017 11; 23(13):1601-1619
Date
11-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Child Abuse - psychology
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Family Relations
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Norway
Survivors - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Child sexual abuse (CSA) is a well-established risk factor for adult victimization in women, but little is known about the importance of relationship to perpetrator and exposure to other violence types. This study interviewed 2,437 Norwegian women (response rate = 45.0%) about their experiences with violence. Logistic regression analyses were employed to estimate associations of multiple categories of childhood violence with adult victimization. Women exposed to CSA often experienced other childhood violence, and the total burden of violence was associated with adult rape and intimate partner violence (IPV). Researchers and clinicians need to take into account the full spectrum of violence exposure.
PubMed ID
27580984 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analytic versus systemic group therapy for women with a history of child sexual abuse: 1-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259757
Source
Psychol Psychother. 2014 Jun;87(2):191-208
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Henriette Elkjaer
Ellids Kristensen
Erik L Mortensen
Stig Poulsen
Marianne Lau
Source
Psychol Psychother. 2014 Jun;87(2):191-208
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology
Denmark
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Group Processes
Humans
Intention to Treat Analysis
Interpersonal Relations
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Abstract
This randomized prospective study examines durability of improvement in general symptomatology, psychosocial functioning and interpersonal problems, and compares the long-term efficacy of analytic and systemic group psychotherapy in women 1 year after completion of treatment for childhood sexual abuse.
Women (n = 106) randomly assigned to analytic or systemic psychotherapy completed the Symptom Checklist-90-R, Global Assessment of Functioning, Global Life Quality, Registration Chart Questionnaire, and Flashback Registration at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and at a 1-year follow-up.
Post-treatment gains were significant for both treatment modalities on all measures, but significantly larger after systemic therapy. Significant treatment response was maintained 1-year post-treatment, but different trajectories were observed: 1 year after treatment completion, improvements for analytic therapy were maintained, whereas they decreased after systemic therapy, resulting in no statistically significant difference in gains between the groups at the 1-year follow-up. Despite maintaining significant gains, more than half of the patients remained above cut-off for caseness concerning general symptomatology at post-treatment and at 1-year follow-up.
The findings stress the importance of long-term follow-up data in effect studies. Different trajectories were associated with the two treatments, but improvement in the two treatment groups did not differ significantly at the 1-year follow-up. Implications of the difference in trajectories for treatment planning are discussed.
Both analytic and systemic group therapy proved efficient in improving general symptomatology, psychosocial functioning, and interpersonal problems in women with a history of CSA and gains were maintained at a 1-year follow-up. Despite maintaining statistically significant gains at the 1-year follow-up, 54% of the patients remained above the cut-off for caseness with respect to general symptomatology, which may indicate a need for further treatment. Different pre-post follow-up treatment trajectories were observed between the two treatment modalities. Thus, while systemic group therapy showed a significantly better outcome immediately after termination, gains in the systemic treatment group decreased during follow-up, while gains were maintained during follow-up in analytic group therapy.
PubMed ID
24014477 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attachment insecurity mediates the relationship between childhood trauma and eating disorder psychopathology in a clinical sample: a structural equation model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114335
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2013 Nov;37(11):926-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Giorgio A Tasca
Kerri Ritchie
Fotini Zachariades
Genevieve Proulx
Anne Trinneer
Louise Balfour
Natasha Demidenko
Genevieve Hayden
Alison Wong
Hany Bissada
Author Affiliation
University of Ottawa, Canada; The Ottawa Hospital, Canada; Carleton University, Canada.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2013 Nov;37(11):926-33
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Abuse - psychology
Eating Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Models, Theoretical
Object Attachment
Risk factors
Self Report
Young Adult
Abstract
Childhood maltreatment occurs often among those with an eating disorder and is considered a nonspecific risk factor. However, the mechanisms by which childhood maltreatment may lead to an eating disorder are not well understood. The current study tests a model in which attachment insecurity is hypothesized to mediate the relationship between childhood maltreatment and eating disorder psychopathology.
Treatment seeking adults with eating disorders (N=308) completed questionnaires about childhood maltreatment, eating disorder psychopathology, and adult attachment.
Structural equation models indicated that childhood trauma had a direct effect on eating disorder symptoms. Also, attachment anxiety and avoidance each equally mediated the childhood maltreatment to eating disorder psychopathology relationship.
Attachment insecurity, characterized by affect dysregulation and interpersonal sensitivities may help to explain why eating disorder symptoms may be one consequence of childhood maltreatment in a clinical sample. Clinicians treating primarily those with trauma might assess for disordered eating as a potential manifestation of the sequelae of trauma and attachment insecurity.
PubMed ID
23623443 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood abuse and common complaints in pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95096
Source
Birth. 2009 Sep;36(3):190-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Lukasse Mirjam
Schei Berit
Vangen Siri
Øian Pål
Author Affiliation
University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Birth. 2009 Sep;36(3):190-9
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child Abuse - classification - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Mandatory Reporting
Mothers - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - psychology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Childhood abuse affects adult health. The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence of emotional, physical, and sexual childhood abuse within a large Norwegian cohort of pregnant women and its association with common complaints in pregnancy. METHODS: This study is based on the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Regression analyses were used to examine associations of childhood abuse and 16 common complaints in pregnancy. RESULTS: Eighteen percent (10,363/55,776) of the women reported some type of childhood abuse. Of all women, 3,870 (6.9%) reported sexual abuse, 3,075 (5.5%) physical abuse, and 7,619 (13.6%) emotional abuse as a child. Of those reporting childhood abuse, 31 percent reported two or more types of abuse. All 16 common complaints in pregnancy were associated with reported childhood abuse. Women reporting three types of childhood abuse reported 5.4 common complaints in pregnancy (mean) compared with 3.7 for women without childhood abuse (p
PubMed ID
19747265 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood abuse and fear of childbirth--a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139256
Source
Birth. 2010 Dec;37(4):267-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Mirjam Lukasse
Siri Vangen
Pål Øian
Merethe Kumle
Elsa Lena Ryding
Berit Schei
Author Affiliation
University of Tromsø, Tromsø, and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Birth. 2010 Dec;37(4):267-74
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fear
Female
Humans
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Parturition - psychology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology - psychology
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Childhood abuse affects adult health. The objective of this study was to examine the association between a self-reported history of childhood abuse and fear of childbirth.
A population-based, cross-sectional study was conducted of 2,365 pregnant women at five obstetrical departments in Norway. We measured childhood abuse using the Norvold Abuse Questionnaire and fear of childbirth using the Wijma Delivery Expectancy Questionnaire. Severe fear of childbirth was defined as a Wijma Delivery Expectancy Questionnaire score of = 85.
Of all women, 566 (23.9%) had experienced any childhood abuse, 257 (10.9%) had experienced emotional abuse, 260 (11%) physical abuse, and 290 (12.3%) sexual abuse. Women with a history of childhood abuse reported severe fear of childbirth significantly more often than those without a history of childhood abuse, 18 percent versus 10 percent (p = 0.001). The association between a history of childhood abuse and severe fear of childbirth remained significant after adjustment for confounding factors for primiparas (adjusted OR: 2.00; 95% CI: 1.30-3.08) but lost its significance for multiparas (adjusted OR: 1.17; 95% CI: 0.76-1.80). The factor with the strongest association with severe fear of childbirth among multiparas was a negative birth experience (adjusted OR: 5.50; 95% CI: 3.77-8.01).
A history of childhood abuse significantly increased the risk of experiencing severe fear of childbirth among primiparas. Fear of childbirth among multiparas was most strongly associated with a negative birth experience.
PubMed ID
21083717 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood adversities and chronic conditions: examination of mediators, recall bias and age at diagnosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294581
Source
Int J Public Health. 2018 Mar; 63(2):181-192
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Mashhood Ahmed Sheikh
Author Affiliation
Health Services Research Unit, Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, 9037, Tromsø, Norway. mashhood.a.sheikh@uit.no.
Source
Int J Public Health. 2018 Mar; 63(2):181-192
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Adult Survivors of Child Adverse Events - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Age of Onset
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bias
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Poverty
Risk factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to (1) identify the influence of childhood socioeconomic status (CSES) on five chronic conditions: asthma, bronchitis, hypothyroid, migraine, and psychiatric disorders in later life; (2) determine the mediating role of childhood abuse (CA) in these associations, and (3) quantify recall bias due to respondent's mental health in these associations.
10,325 men and women from the Tromsø Study were followed for 13 years, and Poisson regression models were used.
Low CSES was associated with a 16-23% higher risk of chronic conditions, and CA was associated with a 16-58% higher risk of chronic conditions (p 
Notes
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2006 Mar;188:278-83 PMID 16507971
Cites: Child Dev. 2015 Jan-Feb;86(1):303-9 PMID 25056599
Cites: Front Psychol. 2016 May 25;7:727 PMID 27252668
Cites: Int J Public Health. 2017 Dec;62(9):1007-1017 PMID 28656323
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009 Dec;163(12):1135-43 PMID 19996051
Cites: Front Psychol. 2016 Nov 23;7:1828 PMID 27933010
Cites: Int J Public Health. 2017 Jan;62(1):53-62 PMID 27173164
Cites: Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2016 Jun;31(6):629-37 PMID 26452069
Cites: J Aging Health. 2009 Oct;21(7):943-66 PMID 19773595
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2010;31:329-47 3p following 347 PMID 20070189
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2015 Oct;142:109-17 PMID 26301483
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2016 Mar;50(3):344-352 PMID 26474668
Cites: Matern Child Health J. 2013 Apr;17(3):424-31 PMID 22466716
Cites: Stroke. 2000 Jul;31(7):1602-7 PMID 10884460
Cites: Physiol Behav. 2012 Apr 12;106(1):29-39 PMID 21888923
Cites: PLoS One. 2014 Feb 24;9(2):e89845 PMID 24587071
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2015 Jan;94(1):28-34 PMID 25250917
Cites: Eur Respir Rev. 2015 Jun;24(136):299-305 PMID 26028641
Cites: J Am Assoc Nurse Pract. 2015 Aug;27(8):457-65 PMID 25755161
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2014 Nov 18;14:1172 PMID 25404212
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 2011 May;37(3):546-53 PMID 19776204
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2014 May;42(3):263-9 PMID 24265163
Cites: Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Feb;68(2):137-44 PMID 23627687
Cites: Int J Public Health. 2017 Jun;62(5):551-562 PMID 28110395
Cites: Int J Public Health. 2017 Mar;62(2):283-292 PMID 27913814
Cites: Public Health. 2013 Aug;127(8):754-60 PMID 23876298
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 2005 Jun;46(2):205-19 PMID 16028458
Cites: Gerontologist. 2009 Jun;49(3):333-43 PMID 19377044
Cites: SAGE Open Med. 2016 Jan 08;4:2050312115622857 PMID 26835013
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2013 Mar 02;13:186 PMID 23452504
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2013 Oct 15;110(42):17149-53 PMID 24062432
Cites: Psychosom Med. 2010 Sep;72(7):694-701 PMID 20595419
Cites: Front Psychol. 2011 Jan 31;1:246 PMID 21833299
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 2013 Mar;54(1):75-91 PMID 23426854
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2012 Aug;41(4):961-7 PMID 21422063
Cites: Int J Public Health. 2017 May;62(4):489-494 PMID 28213785
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2013 May;147(1-3):288-94 PMID 23337654
Cites: Eur J Psychotraumatol. 2015 Jan 13;6:26259 PMID 25591729
Cites: Child Abuse Negl. 2007 May;31(5):517-30 PMID 17532465
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2015 Sep;207(3):213-20 PMID 26045352
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2013 Nov;48(11):1829-39 PMID 23661148
Cites: Front Psychol. 2017 Aug 02;8:1317 PMID 28824498
Cites: Biodemography Soc Biol. 2017;63(2):87-103 PMID 28521624
PubMed ID
28736801 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood and adult stressors and major depression risk: interpreting interactions with the sufficient-component cause model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257035
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2013 Jun;48(6):927-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Scott B Patten
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, 3280 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, AB, T2N 4Z6, Canada. patten@ucalgary.ca
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2013 Jun;48(6):927-33
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Population Surveillance
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Abstract
Using a representative longitudinal cohort consisting of more than 8,000 community residents, this study sought to evaluate patterns of interaction between childhood adversity and adult stressors in relation to MDE. The goal was to interpret the interactions using epidemiologic theory.
A Canadian longitudinal study called the National Population Health Survey (NPHS) was the data source. This NPHS began in 1994 and the cohort has subsequently been interviewed every 2 years. Childhood adversities were assessed retrospectively and adult stressors and MDE were evaluated during follow-up. Interactions between various potential MDE risk factors were assessed on an additive scale using linear regression and on a multiplicative scale using logistic regression.
Hypothesized interactions between negative childhood experiences and more recent stressors were apparent in statistical models adopting an additive (linear regression), but not multiplicative (logisitic), perspective. According to the component-cause model of etiology, this pattern suggests shared causal mechanisms. There was no general tendency for such interactions to occur with other risk factors.
Biological mechanisms responsible for early life calibration of stress response systems may generate persistent sensitization to stressors, thereby increasing the risk of MDE following exposure to stressful events later in life. Reliance on multiplicative models such as logistic regression and log-binomial regression in psychiatric epidemiological studies may render etiologically important interactions more difficult to identify.
PubMed ID
23114784 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood experiences of female family-violence perpetrators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295063
Source
Perspect Psychiatr Care. 2018 Apr; 54(2):251-257
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Pia Keiski
Aune Flinck
Marja Kaunonen
Eija Paavilainen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Sciences, Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Perspect Psychiatr Care. 2018 Apr; 54(2):251-257
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology
Domestic Violence - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Middle Aged
Parents - psychology
Qualitative Research
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore the childhood experiences of women who have perpetrated family-violence and voluntarily sought help.
The qualitative design includes in-depth, unstructured individual interviews with 19 women who have perpetrated family-violence.
The categories of maltreatment exposure, parental capability, and a role of the sensitive, good girl are identified and described in this article.
The findings provide guidance for nurses who encounter families at risk of female family-violence perpetration and for those developing preventive interventions for female family-violence perpetrators whose family-of-origin issues are essential in processing issues of self.
PubMed ID
28714060 View in PubMed
Less detail

67 records – page 1 of 7.