Skip header and navigation

Refine By

107070 records – page 1 of 10707.

Parental alcohol consumption and adult children's educational attainment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300971
Source
Econ Hum Biol. 2018 02; 28:132-145
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2018
Author
Lucia Mangiavacchi
Luca Piccoli
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Economics, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Crt Valldemossa km. 7.5, Palma de Mallorca, Spain; IZA, Bonn, Germany. Electronic address: lucia.mangiavacchi@uib.es.
Source
Econ Hum Biol. 2018 02; 28:132-145
Date
02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Academic Success
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Children - statistics & numerical data
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Parents
Russia
Young Adult
Abstract
This study analyses whether an excessive parental alcohol consumption during childhood can affect long run children's educational attainments. Using 19 waves of the Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (RLMS), where individuals and their families are followed from childhood to adulthood, this study analyses parental alcohol consumption during childhood (between 1994 and 2001) and its relation with children's educational attainment about twelve years later (from 2005 to 2014). Panel estimations show that mother's excessive alcohol consumption during childhood is consistently negatively associated with children educational outcomes, as years of education, the highest education grade achieved and the probability of having a tertiary education degree, a finding that is robust to possible endogeneity issues. In particular, while moderate drinking is not an issue, an additional standard glass of vodka (15.57?g of pure alcohol) consumed by the mother per day, reduces years of education by almost one year (0.88), and by 5.8 percentage points (or about 27%) the probability of having a university degree. The study also explores the transmission mechanisms suggested by the literature, identifying a significant role for prenatal exposure to alcohol and, to a lesser extent, for intergenerational transmission of drinking habits.
PubMed ID
29413887 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood experiences of female family-violence perpetrators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295063
Source
Perspect Psychiatr Care. 2018 Apr; 54(2):251-257
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Pia Keiski
Aune Flinck
Marja Kaunonen
Eija Paavilainen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Sciences, Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Perspect Psychiatr Care. 2018 Apr; 54(2):251-257
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology
Domestic Violence - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Middle Aged
Parents - psychology
Qualitative Research
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore the childhood experiences of women who have perpetrated family-violence and voluntarily sought help.
The qualitative design includes in-depth, unstructured individual interviews with 19 women who have perpetrated family-violence.
The categories of maltreatment exposure, parental capability, and a role of the sensitive, good girl are identified and described in this article.
The findings provide guidance for nurses who encounter families at risk of female family-violence perpetration and for those developing preventive interventions for female family-violence perpetrators whose family-of-origin issues are essential in processing issues of self.
PubMed ID
28714060 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Alaska Native Epidemiology Center. 8 pages.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
Sep-2009
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Infants . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Young Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Teens and Young Adults . . . . . . . . . 4 Adults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Elders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Resources
  1 document  
Source
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Alaska Native Epidemiology Center. 8 pages.
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
1922117
Keywords
Adults
Alaska Natives
Children
Elders
Infants
Suicide risk
Teens
Young adults
Abstract
In the Dena'ina Athabascan language Yagheli Ch'tsizlan means"we are getting healthier," and in many important ways this is true.Although we face many challenges, the Alaska Native community has made great strides in health over the years. In this booklet we are highlighting some key Alaska Native health concerns. Addressing these concerns is an important step on the path towards getting healthier.
Notes
Yagheli Ch'tsizlan : We Are Getting Healthier.
Documents
Less detail

Recommended Nordic paediatric reference intervals for 21 common biochemical properties.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120355
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2013 Feb;73(1):1-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Linda Hilsted
Pål Rustad
Lise Aksglæde
Kaspar Sørensen
Anders Juul
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Rigshospitalet Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. linda.hilsted@rh.regionh.dk
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2013 Feb;73(1):1-9
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Reference Values
Young Adult
Abstract
Paediatric reference intervals based on samples from healthy children are difficult to establish and consequently data are often from hospitalized children. Furthermore, biases may present in published data due to differences in the analytical methods employed. Blood samples from 1429 healthy Danish children were collected for establishing reference intervals for 21 common biochemical properties (Alanine transaminase, Albumin, Alkaline phosphatase, Aspartate transaminase, Bilirubin, Calcium, Cholesterol, Creatinine, Creatine kinase, HDL-Cholesterol, Iron, Lactate dehydrogenase, LDL- Cholesterol, Magnesium, Phosphate, Potassium, Protein, Sodium, Transferrin, Triglycerides and Urate). Samples were analyzed on a Roche-Modular-P/ISE-system. The NORIP reference material (NFKK Reference Serum X) was included in all the analytical runs. Reference values were recalculated according to the target values of X for the properties and statistical calculations carried out as performed in the NORIP study. Thus commutable (regarding analytical method) reference intervals for 20 properties were established and for LDL-Cholesterol reference intervals were reported for the specific analytical method employed. The data were compared to previous studies and to those obtained from the youngest age group in the NORIP study. Marked age differences were observed for most of the properties. Several properties also showed gender-related differences, mainly at the onset of puberty. Data are presented as suggested intervals for combined age groups, but can be accessed via the NORIP home page if more detailed division according to age or gender is desired.
Notes
Erratum In: Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2013 Dec;73(8):661
PubMed ID
23013046 View in PubMed
Less detail

The impact of parental educational trajectories on their adult offspring's overweight/obesity status: a study of three generations of Swedish men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265455
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2014 Nov;120:199-207
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Chaparro MP
Koupil I
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2014 Nov;120:199-207
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Children
Cohort Studies
Educational Status
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Parents
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of grandparental and parental education and parental educational trajectory on their adult offspring's overweight/obesity. We used register data from the Uppsala Birth Cohort Multigenerational Study, based on a representative cohort born in Sweden 1915-1929 (G1). Our sample included 5122 women and 11,204 men who were grandchildren of G1 (G3), their parents (G2), and grandparents. G3's overweight/obesity (BMI=25 kg/m2) was based on pre-pregnancy weight/height for women before their first birth (average age=26 years), and measured weight/height at conscription for men (average age=18 years). G1's, G2's, and G3's highest educational attainment was obtained from routine registers and classified as low, intermediate, or high based on respective sample distributions. Parental (G2) educational trajectory was defined as change in education between their own and their highest educated parent (G1), classified into 5 categories: always advantaged (AA), upward trajectory (UT), stable-intermediate (SI), downward trajectory (DT), and always disadvantaged (AD). We used hierarchical gender-stratified logistic regression models adjusted for G3's age, education, year of BMI collection, lineage and G2's year of birth and income. Grandparental and parental education were negatively associated with men's odds of overweight/obesity and parental education affected women's overweight/obesity risk. Furthermore, men and women whose parents belonged to the UT, SI, DT, and AD groups had greater odds of overweight/obesity compared to men and women whose parents belonged to the AA group (adjusted for G3's age, year of BMI collection, lineage, and G2's year of birth). These associations were attenuated when further adjusting for parental income and G3's own education. Socioeconomic inequalities can have long-term consequences and impact the health of future generations. For overweight/obesity in concurrent young cohorts, this inequality is not fully offset by upward educational trajectory in their parent's generation.
PubMed ID
25259658 View in PubMed
Less detail

Data from Russian Help to Determine in Which Languages the Possible Word Constraint Applies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290893
Source
J Psycholinguist Res. 2017 Jun; 46(3):629-640
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Svetlana Alexeeva
Anastasia Frolova
Natalia Slioussar
Author Affiliation
Department of Liberal Arts and Sciences, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia.
Source
J Psycholinguist Res. 2017 Jun; 46(3):629-640
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Language
Male
Reaction Time - physiology
Russia
Speech
Young Adult
Abstract
The Possible Word Constraint, or PWC, is a speech segmentation principle prohibiting to postulate word boundaries if a remaining segment contains only consonants. The PWC was initially formulated for English where all words contain a vowel and claimed to hold universally after being confirmed for various other languages. However, it is crucial to look at languages that allow for words without vowels. Two such languages have been tested: data from Slovak were compatible with the PWC, while data from Tarifiyt Berber did not support it. We hypothesize that the fixed word stress could influence the results in Slovak and report two word-spotting experiments on Russian, which has similar one-consonant words, but flexible word stress. The results contradict the PWC, so we suggest that it does not operate in the languages where words without vowels are possible, while the results from Slovak might be explained by its prosodic properties.
Notes
ErratumIn: J Psycholinguist Res. 2017 Jun;46(3):641 PMID 28210921
Cites: Brain Lang. 2002 Apr-Jun;81(1-3):144-61 PMID 12081388
Cites: Psychol Sci. 2002 May;13(3):258-62 PMID 12009047
Cites: Cogn Psychol. 1997 Dec;34(3):191-243 PMID 9466831
Cites: J Acoust Soc Am. 2007 Jul;122(1):554-67 PMID 17614511
Cites: J Acoust Soc Am. 2009 Mar;125(3):1693-703 PMID 19275326
Cites: J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform. 1995 Apr;21(2):344-59 PMID 7714476
Cites: Cognition. 2012 Jul;124(1):79-84 PMID 22520620
Cites: J Psycholinguist Res. 2004 Mar;33(2):165-73 PMID 15098513
Cites: Psychol Bull. 1993 Nov;114(3):510-32 PMID 8272468
Cites: Q J Exp Psychol (Hove). 2010 Mar;63(3):555-79 PMID 19626577
PubMed ID
27853918 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Mother and Baby Interaction Scale: a valid broadband instrument for efficient screening of postpartum interaction? A preliminary validation in a Norwegian community sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121622
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2013 Sep;27(3):733-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Magnhild S Høivik
Nina A Burkeland
Olav M Linaker
Turid Suzanne Berg-Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway. magnhild.s.hoivik@ntnu.no
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2013 Sep;27(3):733-9
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Norway
Pilot Projects
Postpartum Period
Young Adult
Abstract
The mother-infant relationship may represent a risk or a protective factor for child development. Hence, an early focus on the relationship may be a worthwhile preventive measure. A simple 10-item instrument, the Mother and Baby Interaction Scale, could be a convenient screening instrument for early bonding failure. In this pilot study, preliminary indications of the internal consistency, stability, principal components validity of the Mother and Baby Interaction Scale were investigated.
Seventy-six postpartum women participated. The Mother and Baby Interaction Scale and Postpartum Bonding Questionnaire were completed together with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. The internal reliability of the Mother and Baby Interaction Scale, and its correlations with the Postpartum Bonding Questionnaire and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, was examined. Principal component analysis of the Mother and Baby Interaction Scale was conducted, and the emerging subscales were compared with the Postpartum Bonding Questionnaire.
The principal component analysis yielded four subscales: Bonding problems, Worries about caretaking, Regulation and routine and Sensitivity and separation. We found acceptable internal consistency of the Mother and Baby Interaction Scale. The total score of the Mother and Baby Interaction Scale correlated better (r=0.72) with the Postpartum Bonding Questionnaire than the four subscales. The correlation between the total scores of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and the Mother And Baby Interaction Scale was r=0.49.
The total score of the Mother and Baby Interaction Scale is a promising measure for early screening of the quality of the mother-infant relationship and is suitable for general practitioners, midwives and other health workers dealing with postpartum women and their children.
PubMed ID
22892011 View in PubMed
Less detail

Case study of posts before and after a suicide on a Swedish internet forum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277329
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2015 Dec;207(6):476-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Michael Westerlund
Gergö Hadlaczky
Danuta Wasserman
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2015 Dec;207(6):476-82
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Communication
Humans
Internet
Male
Social Support
Suicide - psychology
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Websites and discussion forums have become an important and sometimes controversial source of information on suicide. Using a case report, our aim was to examine the responses, attitudes and beliefs that were communicated on a forum before, during and after a suicide act. We undertook two related analyses: a qualitative investigation of the messages that were posted before the suicide and a combined qualitative-quantitative analysis of the messages posted during and after the suicide. Nearly half the posted messages before the suicide encouraged the victim to complete the suicidal act, and a surprising number of posts after the suicide expressed excitement, although around half of the posts considered the suicide to be tragic. It is of great importance to increase awareness of suicide signals and understanding about how to respond to individuals who communicate suicide intentions on different forums on the internet.
Notes
Cites: Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2012 Feb;262(1):39-4621505949
Cites: Arch Psychiatr Nurs. 2010 Feb;24(1):63-820117690
Cites: Crisis. 2011;32(3):128-3321616761
Cites: Arch Suicide Res. 2009;13(3):264-7619591000
Cites: J Prev Med Public Health. 2009 May;42(3):183-919491562
Cites: Cult Med Psychiatry. 2008 Dec;32(4):516-5118800195
Cites: Crisis. 2008;29(3):118-2218714907
Cites: BMJ. 2008 Apr 12;336(7648):800-218403541
Cites: Crisis. 1997;18(2):73-99286130
Cites: Psychol Rev. 1990 Jan;97(1):90-1132408091
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1990 Feb;147(2):190-52278535
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2010;12(5):e4821169164
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2010 Sep;197(3):234-4320807970
Cites: Transcult Psychiatry. 2010 Jul;47(3):392-41820688797
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2012 Jul;75(2):419-2822580072
Cites: Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2012 Oct;42(5):471-8522924960
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2012;14(5):e12223010086
Cites: Psychol Rep. 2012 Aug;111(1):186-823045860
Cites: Transcult Psychiatry. 2013 Apr;50(2):303-2223315147
Cites: Int Rev Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;26(4):467-7525137113
Cites: Lancet. 2015 Apr 18;385(9977):1536-4425579833
Cites: Eur Psychiatry. 2001 Nov;16(7):379-8511728849
Cites: Nord J Psychiatry. 2003;57(5):365-7114522610
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1986 May;73(5):481-993751655
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1988 Nov;27(6):675-873058676
PubMed ID
26628690 View in PubMed
Less detail

Menstrual cycles are influenced by sunshine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140158
Source
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2011 Sep;27(9):711-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Konstantin V Danilenko
Oksana Y Sergeeva
Evgeniy G Verevkin
Author Affiliation
Institute of Internal Medicine, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia. kvdani@mail.ru
Source
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2011 Sep;27(9):711-6
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Menstrual Cycle
Ovary - physiology
Russia
Seasons
Sunlight
Young Adult
Abstract
The study determined the effect of seasons and meteorological variables on ovarian-menstrual function.
Women (N=129) living in Novosibirsk (55°N), Russia, provided data on normal menstrual cycles for over 1 year between 1999 and 2008. Of these, 18 together with 20 other healthy women were investigated once in winter and once in summer in 2006-2009. The investigated variables included serum levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinising hormone (LH) and prolactin on day ~ 7 of the menstrual cycle, ovary follicle size (by ultrasound) on day ~ 12 and ovulation occurrence on subsequent days.
In summer vs. winter, there was a trend towards increased FSH secretion, significantly larger ovarian follicle size, higher frequency of ovulation (97% vs. 71%) and a shorter menstrual cycle (by 0.9 days). LH and prolactin levels did not change. In all seasons combined, increased sunshine (data derived from local meteorological records) 2-3 days before the presumed ovulation day (calculated from the mean menstrual cycle) led to a shorter cycle length. Air/perceived temperature, atmospheric pressure, moon phase/light were not significant predictors.
Ovarian activity is greater in summer vs. winter in women living in a continental climate at temperate latitudes; sunshine is a factor that influences menstrual cycle.
PubMed ID
20937003 View in PubMed
Less detail

Perceptions of plain and branded cigarette packaging among Norwegian youth and adults: a focus group study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120990
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2013 Feb;15(2):450-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Janne Scheffels
Gunnar Sæbø
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Alcohol and Drug Research (SIRUS), Oslo, Norway. js@sirus.no
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2013 Feb;15(2):450-6
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Commerce
Focus Groups
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Tobacco
Young Adult
Abstract
In Norway, packaging is one of the few remaining ways for tobacco companies to promote their products. Plain packaging of tobacco products could be a means to limit this promotion.
Eleven focus group interviews with daily, occasional, and former smokers and nonsmokers (N = 69) aged 16-50 were undertaken to explore perceptions of different cigarette brands, the role of package design in communicating brand images, and how participants perceived cigarette packages when important design elements such as colors, symbols, logos, and branded fonts were removed.
Distinct images of brands and user identities associated with these were narrated. Elements of the package design such as colors, images, and fonts were described as configuring brand images. Compared with current, completely branded cigarette packages, packages that displayed progressively fewer branding design elements were perceived increasingly unfavorably and as detracting from the images that packages otherwise communicate.
The findings indicate that packaging is vital to consumer identification with and differentiation between cigarette brands and that a policy of plain packaging could be useful in reducing the impact of packaging in promotion of tobacco products.
PubMed ID
22949580 View in PubMed
Less detail

107070 records – page 1 of 10707.