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175 records – page 1 of 18.

Acute sarcoid arthritis: a favourable outcome? A retrospective survey of 49 patients with review of the literature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14315
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 1996;25(2):70-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
J T Gran
E. Bøhmer
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, Central Hospital of Aust Agder, Arendal, Norway.
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 1996;25(2):70-3
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - therapeutic use
Adult
Aged
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Arthritis - complications - drug therapy - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies
Retrospective Studies
Sarcoidosis - complications
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Forty-nine patients, 30 males and 19 females with acute sarcoid arthritis admitted to three different hospitals in Norway were studied retrospectively. All patients had peripheral arthritis and hilar adenopathy, and 87.8% also presented with erythema nodosum (EN). Mean duration of arthritis was 3.7 months (0.5-12 months), but in 26% of the cases, duration of the inflammatory joint disease exceeded three months. Radiological bony erosions were not seen. Two patients had recurrence of acute sarcoid arthritis, 14 months and 10 years after the initial episode, respectively. Two other patients developed chronic myalgia and fibromyalgia. Four patients, one female and three males, developed chronic pulmonal sarcoidosis. Of these, two patients had simultaneous onset of acute sarcoid arthritis and parenchymal disease while two patients developed chronic lung disease three months after onset of acute sarcoid arthritis. We thus tentatively suggest that although acute sarcoid arthritis is usually a self-limiting joint disease, recurrences may occasionally occur and some cases develop chronic sarcoidosis of the lungs.
PubMed ID
8614769 View in PubMed
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Acute supraglottitis in adults in Finland: review and analysis of 308 cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131559
Source
Laryngoscope. 2011 Oct;121(10):2107-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Argyro J Bizaki
Jura Numminen
Jussi-Pekka Vasama
Jussi Laranne
Markus Rautiainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Tampere University and Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland. arbizaki@gmail.com
Source
Laryngoscope. 2011 Oct;121(10):2107-13
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - therapeutic use
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual
Drug Therapy, Combination
Epiglottitis - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitals, University
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Survival Rate
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this article is to study the clinical features, management, and outcome in adult patients with acute supraglottitis.
Retrospective review.
We searched the medical records from our database from the years 1989 to 2009 using codes of international statistical classification of diseases and related health problems for acute epiglottitis or supraglottitis. In total, 308 patients were identified.
Incidence of acute supraglottitis increased from 1.88 (first decade) to 4.73 per 100,000 cases (second decade) (P = .05). The mean age of the patients was 49 years old with a slightly male predominance. Sore throat and odynophagia were the most common symptoms. Concomitant disease were common among the patients. Isolated inflammation of epiglottis without involvement of other supraglottic tissue was detected only in 51 patients. Intravenous cephalosporins were the most common empiric antibiotic treatment regimen. Intravenous corticosteroids were administered to half of the cases. Streptococcus was the most common organism in throat cultures. In total, 45 patients needed airway intervention. Complications were rare and mortality was 0.6% in our series.
Acute supraglottitis in adults seems to be a different entity than epiglottitis in children, and inflammation does not usually exclusively involve the epiglottis. Early diagnosis seems to decrease the need for airway intervention and to permit the successful treatment of the patient with intravenous antibiotics and corticosteroids. Streptococcus appears as the dominant causative microorganism. However systemic diseases and other local infections that compromise the regional supraglottic immunity may increase the risk for acute supraglottitis.
PubMed ID
21898436 View in PubMed
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Adrenal response after trauma is affected by time after trauma and sedative/analgesic drugs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262760
Source
Injury. 2014 Aug;45(8):1149-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Camilla Brorsson
Per Dahlqvist
Leif Nilsson
Johan Thunberg
Anders Sylvan
Silvana Naredi
Source
Injury. 2014 Aug;45(8):1149-55
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - therapeutic use
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Dehydroepiandrosterone - metabolism
Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate - metabolism
Female
Humans
Hydrocortisone - metabolism
Hypnotics and Sedatives - therapeutic use
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Pituitary-Adrenal Function Tests - methods
Pituitary-Adrenal System - drug effects - metabolism - physiopathology
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Time Factors
Trauma Severity Indices
Treatment Outcome
Wounds and Injuries - drug therapy - metabolism - physiopathology
Abstract
The adrenal response in critically ill patients, including trauma victims, has been debated over the last decade. The aim of this study was to assess the early adrenal response after trauma.
Prospective, observational study of 50 trauma patients admitted to a level-1-trauma centre. Serum and saliva cortisol were followed from the accident site up to five days after trauma. Corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and sulphated dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEAS) were obtained twice during the first five days after trauma. The effect of time and associations between cortisol levels and; severity of trauma, infusion of sedative/analgesic drugs, cardiovascular dysfunction and other adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) dependent hormones (DHEA/DHEAS) were studied.
There was a significant decrease over time in serum cortisol both during the initial 24 h, and from the 2nd to the 5th morning after trauma. A significant decrease over time was also observed in calculated free cortisol, DHEA, and DHEAS. No significant association was found between an injury severity score = 16 (severe injury) and a low (
PubMed ID
24975481 View in PubMed
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Adult Asthma Consensus Guidelines update 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179197
Source
Can Respir J. 2004 May-Jun;11 Suppl A:9A-18A
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Author
Catherine Lemière
Tony Bai
Meyer Balter
Charles Bayliff
Allan Becker
Louis-Philippe Boulet
Dennis Bowie
André Cartier
Andrew Cave
Kenneth Chapman
Robert Cowie
Stephen Coyle
Donald Cockcroft
Francine M Ducharme
Pierre Ernst
Shelagh Finlayson
J Mark FitzGerald
Frederick E Hargreave
Donna Hogg
Alan Kaplan
Harold Kim
Cheryle Kelm
Paul O'Byrne
Malcolm Sears
Andrea White Markham
Author Affiliation
Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec. C-Lemiere@crhsc.umontreal.ca
Source
Can Respir J. 2004 May-Jun;11 Suppl A:9A-18A
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - therapeutic use
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Asthma - drug therapy
Canada
Education, Medical, Continuing
Humans
Leukotriene Antagonists - therapeutic use
Patient Education as Topic
Abstract
Several sets of Canadian guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma have been published over the past 15 years. Since the last revision of the 1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Report, important new studies have highlighted the need to incorporate new information into the asthma guidelines.
To review the literature on adult asthma management published between January 2000 and June 2003; to evaluate the influence of the new evidence on the recommendations made in the 1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Guidelines and its 2001 update; and to report new recommendations on adult asthma management.
Three specific topics for which new evidence affected the previous recommendations were selected for review: initial treatment of asthma, add-on therapies in the treatment of asthma and asthma education. The resultant reviews were discussed in June 2003 at a meeting under the auspices of the Canadian Thoracic Society, and recommendations for adult asthma management were reviewed.
The present report emphasises the importance of the early introduction of inhaled corticosteroids in symptomatic patients with mild asthma; stresses the benefit of adding additional therapy, preferably long-acting beta2-agonists, to patients incompletely controlled on low doses of inhaled corticosteroids; and documents the essential role of asthma education.
The present report generally supports many of the previous recommendations published in the 1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Report and provides higher levels of evidence for a number of those recommendations.
PubMed ID
15254605 View in PubMed
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[Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143431
Source
Duodecim. 2010;126(4):356-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Ulla Hodgson
Author Affiliation
HYKS:n keuhkosairauksien klinikka, PL 340, 00029 HUS.
Source
Duodecim. 2010;126(4):356-63
Date
2010
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - therapeutic use
Antifungal Agents - therapeutic use
Aspergillosis, Allergic Bronchopulmonary - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Diagnosis, Differential
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Itraconazole - therapeutic use
Prognosis
Radiography, Thoracic
Risk factors
Abstract
The number of patients with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis is estimated to be between 2500 and 5000 in Finland. Genetic factors and bronchial epithelial cells in those having asthma or cystic fibrosis may upon exposure to Aspergillus fungus lead to airway inflammation that can slowly damage the lung tissue. Treatment of the disease is primarily based on settling of the inflammation with an oral corticosteroid and currently often also with itraconazole medication directed to the inflammation and attempting to eradicate aspergillus. Long-term prognosis is quite good, provided that the disease is detected and treated at an early stage.
PubMed ID
20486486 View in PubMed
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Allergic rhinitis and pharmacological management in elite athletes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174969
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 May;37(5):707-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Antti Alaranta
Hannu Alaranta
Markku Heliövaara
Pirkko Alha
Petri Palmu
Ilkka Helenius
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. antti.alaranta@helsinki.fi
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 May;37(5):707-11
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - therapeutic use
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Conjunctivitis, Allergic - drug therapy - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Histamine H1 Antagonists - therapeutic use
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - drug therapy - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Sports
Abstract
Only a few studies have examined the occurrence of atopy and clinically apparent allergic disease and their pharmacological management in elite athletes. The aim of the study was to assess the frequency of allergic rhinitis and the use of antiallergic medication within the subgroups of elite athletes as compared with a representative sample of young adults of the same age.
A cross-sectional survey was carried out in 2002. All the athletes (N = 494) financially supported by the National Olympic Committee comprised the study group. Of them, 446 (90.3%) filled in a structured questionnaire concerning asthma and allergies, the use of medication, characteristics of sport activities, and smoking habits. A representative sample of Finnish young adults (N = 1504) served as controls.
The endurance athletes reported physician-diagnosed allergic rhinitis more often (36.1%) than other athletes (23.4%) or control subjects (20.2%). The use of antiallergic medication was reported by 33.3, 15.7, and 15.6% of those, respectively. Among both athletes and controls, females reported the use of antiallergic medication more often than males. Only half of those athletes reporting allergic rhinitis had used antiallergic medication during the past year. After adjusting for age and sex, OR (95% CI) for allergic rhinitis and the use of antiallergic medication were 2.24 (1.48-3.39) and 2.79 (1.82-4.28), respectively, in endurance athletes as compared with the controls.
Endurance athletes have physician-diagnosed allergic rhinitis, and they use antiallergic medication more often than athletes in other events or control subjects. Only half of those athletes reporting allergic rhinitis take antiallergic medication. More attention needs to be paid to the optimal management of allergic rhinitis, especially in highly trained endurance athletes.
PubMed ID
15870621 View in PubMed
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Source
Duodecim. 2011;127(13):1355-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Anna Pelkonen
Author Affiliation
HYKS, HUS.
Source
Duodecim. 2011;127(13):1355-60
Date
2011
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Intranasal
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - therapeutic use
Finland - epidemiology
Histamine H1 Antagonists, Non-Sedating - therapeutic use
Humans
Pollen - immunology
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology
Seasons
Abstract
Summertime allergic symptoms include sneezing, running and stuffy nose, burning and itching eyes and wheal formation on the skin. In Finland the problems in allergic people during the spring and summer are mainly associated with the pollen of birch, alder, hazel, grasses and mugwort. The efficacy of drugs used for the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis varies. Treatment is usually initiated with a non-sedating antihistamine, and nasally sprayable corticosteroids can be used if the symptoms are more severe.
PubMed ID
21834339 View in PubMed
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Ambulatory use of inhaled beta(2)-agonists for the treatment of asthma in Quebec : a population-based utilization review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194701
Source
Chest. 2001 May;119(5):1316-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2001
Author
R. Blais
J P Grégoire
R. Rouleau
A. Cartier
J. Bouchard
L P Boulet
Author Affiliation
Département d'administration de la santé et Groupe de recherche interdisciplinaire en santé, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada. Regis.Blais@umontreal.on.ca
Source
Chest. 2001 May;119(5):1316-21
Date
May-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - therapeutic use
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Aged
Albuterol - administration & dosage
Ambulatory Care
Asthma - drug therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Delayed-Action Preparations
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
To assess whether the utilization of inhaled short-acting beta(2)-agonists (ISAB) and inhaled long-acting beta(2)-agonists (ILAB) for the treatment of asthma was appropriate according to the 1996 Canadian Asthma Consensus Conference recommendations.
Population-based retrospective drug utilization review using pharmacists' billing data of the Prescription Drug Insurance Plan administered by the Quebec health insurance board. However, the database used did not contain complete patient clinical information to accurately assess severity of asthma.
Province of Quebec, Canada.
Persons who received at least one outpatient prescription of ISAB (age range, 5 to 45 years) or ILAB (age range, 12 to 45 years) for the treatment of asthma between August 1997 and April 1998.
Percentages of patients whose use was appropriate according to three criteria regarding the average daily dose of ISAB (criterion 1), the renewal interval of ILAB (criterion 2), and the concomitant daily use of corticosteroids for the expected length of utilization of ILAB (criterion 3).
Overall proportions of appropriate use according to criterion 1 were as follows: 75% (without inhaled corticosteroids [ICS]) and 84% and 43% (with one or more than one prescription of ICS, respectively). Appropriateness was slightly higher for female patients, younger patients (5 to 18 years old), and those treated by pediatricians. However, appropriateness was only 9% among patients who received at least two prescriptions of ISAB during the study period. The proportion of appropriate use was 19% according to criterion 2 and 15% according to criterion 3; there were few differences by gender or by age, but the appropriateness according to criterion 2 was somewhat higher for patients of respirologists.
Compared to the 1996 Canadian asthma consensus conference recommendations, ISAB are overused, ICS are underused, and ILAB are often used improperly. Close collaboration between health professionals and patients is essential to improve the pharmacotherapy of asthma.
PubMed ID
11348934 View in PubMed
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Aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen in cerebrospinal fluid. Variation with age and in childhood leukemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24679
Source
Clin Chim Acta. 1991 Nov 9;203(1):47-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-9-1991
Author
L. Vainionpää
L. Risteli
M. Lanning
V. Myllylä
J. Risteli
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Clin Chim Acta. 1991 Nov 9;203(1):47-56
Date
Nov-9-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - therapeutic use
Adult
Aging - cerebrospinal fluid
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Injections, Spinal
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute - cerebrospinal fluid - drug therapy
Male
Methotrexate - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Peptide Fragments - cerebrospinal fluid
Procollagen - cerebrospinal fluid
Radioimmunoassay
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Analyses of the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 55 children and five young adults without any structural central nervous system (CNS) lesion are reported. The concentration was age-dependent, in that infants and small children had quite high values, whereas the concentration remained relatively constant after the age of 1.5 years. The concentrations of PIIINP in the CSF of 44 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were prospectively determined at the time of diagnosis and during treatment, since deposition of type III collagen is known to occur during fibroproliferative responses triggered by inflammation. Chemical arachnoiditis is known to be associated with intrathecal methotrexate therapy in children with leukemia. The mean concentration in these children at diagnosis (5.8 micrograms/l +/- SD 2.8 micrograms/l) did not differ from that in age-matched controls (6.7 micrograms/l +/- SD 3.2 micrograms/l). Depending on type of the disease, the children were treated according to two different protocols. PIIINP concentrations were significantly higher during the therapy phases which included intrathecally administered methotrexate (P less than 0.001) than at diagnosis of the disease. Corticosteroid treatments were always associated with a significant decrease in PIIINP concentrations (P less than 0.01 and P less than 0.001 in the two groups, respectively), irrespective of the therapy phase. The results suggest that an increase in PIIINP concentration in the CSF of children with ALL is an indicator of a fibroproliferative response in the arachnoid. Corticosteroids may repress this response and possibly also prevent the development of adhesions in the arachnoid.
PubMed ID
1769120 View in PubMed
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175 records – page 1 of 18.