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Access to information for adult adoptees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226501
Source
CMAJ. 1991 Apr 15;144(8):958-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1991
Author
K. Kimbell
Source
CMAJ. 1991 Apr 15;144(8):958-60
Date
Apr-15-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoption
Adult
Birth Certificates
Canada
Confidentiality
Humans
Records as Topic
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 1991 Oct 15;145(8):9231913424
PubMed ID
2009473 View in PubMed
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Adaptation of adopted foreign children at mid-adolescence as indicated by aspects of health and risk taking--a population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34075
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1997 Dec;6(4):199-206
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
K. Berg-Kelly
J. Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, East Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1997 Dec;6(4):199-206
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adoption - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Family Health
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
India - ethnology
Korea - ethnology
Logistic Models
Male
Odds Ratio
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk-Taking
Sexual Behavior
Social Adjustment
Social Behavior Disorders
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
PURPOSE: There is very little data available on adaptation at adolescence after "visible adoptions" (children adopted from abroad), in terms of mental health, risk-taking and problem behaviour in comparison with nonadopted adolescents. This study describes such an outcome. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Data derived from self-reports from 125 adolescents aged 13-18 years who identified themselves as adopted, and who participated in two epidemiological surveys of 9329 adolescents. Their number was representative for children adopted from abroad. The other adolescents served as controls. RESULTS: Family life styles showed no differences between groups. Health was similar to that of the controls. Foreign adopted adolescents significantly often evaluated themselves as shorter and with early puberty. The proportion of adopted girls with suicidal thoughts was significantly larger, they also reported school truancy, not using safety belts, sexual intercourse, unpleasant sexual encounters, and contact with illicit drugs more often than the controls. The stress of early puberty could only partly explain this. CONCLUSIONS: Girls adopted from abroad, representing "visible adoptions", need additional attention and study during adolescence to expose causes for maladaption among some of them.
PubMed ID
9442998 View in PubMed
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Adolescent social functioning in offspring at high risk for schizophrenia spectrum disorders in the Finnish Adoptive Family Study of Schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308280
Source
Schizophr Res. 2020 01; 215:293-299
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2020
Author
Ville Tikkanen
Virva Siira
Karl-Erik Wahlberg
Helinä Hakko
Kristian Läksy
Riikka Roisko
Mika Niemelä
Sami Räsänen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Education, P.O. Box 2000, 90014, University of Oulu, Finland; University of Oulu, Department of Psychiatry, Unit of Clinical Neuroscience, P.O. Box 5000, 90014, University of Oulu, Finland. Electronic address: ville.tikkanen@oulu.fi.
Source
Schizophr Res. 2020 01; 215:293-299
Date
01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child, Adopted
Female
Finland
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Mothers
Psychosocial Functioning
Psychotic Disorders - physiopathology
Schizophrenia - physiopathology
Sex Factors
Social Behavior
Social Interaction
Young Adult
Abstract
Children and adolescents with a genetic risk for schizophrenia are often found to have poorer social functioning compared to their controls. However, less is known about high-risk offspring who have not been reared by a biological parent with schizophrenia. The purpose of this study was to examine deficits in social functioning in adolescence as a possible factor related to genetic vulnerability to schizophrenia spectrum disorders, and also to examine possible gender differences in these associations.
The present sample consisted of 88 genetic high-risk (HR) adoptees whose biological mothers were diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and 83 genetic low-risk (LR) adoptees with biological mothers with non-schizophrenia spectrum disorders or no psychiatric disorders. Adoptees' social functioning at ages 16-20 was assessed using the UCLA Social Attainment Survey.
Compared to LR adoptees, HR adoptees displayed statistically significant deficits in their peer relationships, involvement in activities and overall social functioning during adolescence. HR males were distinguished from LR males by their significantly poorer overall social functioning. Compared to HR females, HR males showed significant deficits in their romantic relationships. Of marginal significance was that HR females displayed more social functioning deficits relative to LR females, mainly in the areas of peer relationships, involvement in activities and overall social functioning.
These results from the adoption and high-risk study design suggest that deficits in social functioning in adolescence may be related to genetic vulnerability to schizophrenia spectrum disorders and that some of these deficits may be gender-specific.
PubMed ID
31699628 View in PubMed
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[Adopted African children have large stomachs]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34403
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Jan 10;117(1):83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-1997
Author
A. Spurkland
M. Steinholt
Author Affiliation
Institutt for transplantasjonsimmunologi Rikshospitalet, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Jan 10;117(1):83
Date
Jan-10-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoption
Africa - ethnology
Child
Humans
Infant
Norway
Stomach - anatomy & histology
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Feb 10;117(4):559-609148462
PubMed ID
9064818 View in PubMed
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[Adopted children and health controls]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42709
Source
Lakartidningen. 1975 Mar 5;72(10):944-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-5-1975

Adopted children entering Canada from underdeveloped countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246931
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1979 Aug 18;121(4):403
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-18-1979
Author
K J Motil
B S Kaplan
P B Pencharz
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1979 Aug 18;121(4):403
Date
Aug-18-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoption
Canada
Child
Developing Countries
Humans
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 1975 Aug 2;2(7927):219-2151974
PubMed ID
466613 View in PubMed
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[Adopted children from abroad: should the PKU-test be included in their health examination?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42002
Source
Lakartidningen. 1977 Mar 23;74(12):1156
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-23-1977

[Adopted children from developing countries. The adjustment of older adopted children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41536
Source
Lakartidningen. 1978 Dec 13;75(50):4677-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-13-1978
Author
M. Cederblad
Source
Lakartidningen. 1978 Dec 13;75(50):4677-8
Date
Dec-13-1978
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoption
Age Factors
Child, Preschool
Developing Countries
Humans
Social Adjustment
Sweden
PubMed ID
723362 View in PubMed
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437 records – page 1 of 44.