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Characteristics and staff resources of child and adolescent psychiatric hospital wards in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175590
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2005 Apr;12(2):209-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
H. Ellilä
A. Sourander
M. Välimäki
J. Piha
Author Affiliation
Turku Polytechnic, Social and Health Care, Finland. heikki.ellila@turkuamk.fi
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2005 Apr;12(2):209-14
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - organization & administration
Adolescent Psychiatry - organization & administration
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Child Psychiatry - organization & administration
Finland
Guidelines as Topic
Health Resources - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Hospital Bed Capacity - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Units - organization & administration
Humans
Medical Staff, Hospital - organization & administration
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration
Occupational Therapy - organization & administration
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - organization & administration
Psychiatric Nursing - organization & administration
Psychology, Clinical - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Social Work, Psychiatric - organization & administration
Workload
Abstract
The aim of this study is to describe structural characteristics and staff resources of child psychiatric and adolescent psychiatric hospital wards in Finland. The target group of the survey consisted of 69 child and adolescent psychiatric hospital units in Finland. Information was obtained from 64 units (93%). Most of the wards were based on 24-h-a-day provision. There were only 7-day-treatment programmes including two family wards. When compared internationally, the numbers of units, beds and staff levels were high in Finland, with all members of staff qualified. The nurse-patient ratio and psychiatrist resources were rather satisfactory. However, in many units there was a lack of psychologists, social workers and occupational therapists. General recommendations and guidelines for staff resources in child and adolescent hospital treatment wards are warranted.
PubMed ID
15788039 View in PubMed
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Child and adolescent mental health policy and plans in Canada: an analytic review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139032
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2010 Nov;55(11):746; author reply 746
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010

A comparison of two hospital districts with low and high figures in the compulsory care of minors: an ecological study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143365
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2011 Aug;46(8):661-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Ulla Siponen
Maritta Välimäki
Matti Kaivosoja
Mauri Marttunen
Riittakerttu Kaltiala-Heino
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, 20014, Turku, Finland. ulla.siponen@turkuai.fi
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2011 Aug;46(8):661-70
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychiatry - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Coercion
Commitment of Mentally Ill - statistics & numerical data
Family Relations
Female
Finland
Hospitals, District - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mental Disorders - classification
Mental Health Services - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Minors
Poisson Distribution
Psychosocial Deprivation
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Regression (Psychology)
Regression Analysis
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The last decade in Finland has seen a vast increase both in involuntary psychiatric treatment of adolescents and in the numbers of adolescents taken into care under the Child Welfare Act. Moreover, the variation in figures between different hospital districts is remarkable. The reasons for this are not known, but it cannot be due to variation in the epidemiology of mental disorders in minors.
The aim of the study was to explore features associated with compulsory care of adolescents at regional level by comparing two hospital districts clearly differing in this regard. The characteristics of involuntarily treated adolescents and adolescents taken into care, the resources and structures of adolescent psychiatric services and child welfare services, and the environmental factors associated with adolescent well-being and adaptation, such as indicators of social deprivation of families were all considered.
For the present study, 2 out of the 22 hospital districts in Finland were selected, one using compulsory psychiatric care and taking into care of 13-17-year olds above and the other below the average in Finland. Register data on patient characteristics, services, and social deprivation were used. Absolute and population adjusted figures (95% confidence intervals) from the variables are given. The differences in incidences between health care districts were compared using Poisson regression analysis.
Proportions of divorces, single parent families, social exclusion and outpatient mental health service use, and detoxification treatment use of adults were higher in the health care district with above average coercion figures than in the area with below average coercion figures. The numbers of adolescent psychiatric outpatient visits were higher in the health care district with coercion figures below average despite the fact that the number of positions in adolescent outpatient services was lower than in the health care district with above average coercion figures.
Factors other than the characteristics of the adolescents themselves are associated with use of compulsory care on them, although an ecological study design cannot establish causality.
PubMed ID
20495974 View in PubMed
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Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2015 Jun 22;177(26):1298
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-22-2015
Author
Marianne Kryger
Hanne Børner
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2015 Jun 22;177(26):1298
Date
Jun-22-2015
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent Psychiatry - organization & administration
Child Psychiatry - organization & administration
Denmark
PubMed ID
26550633 View in PubMed
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The right stuff for early intervention in psychosis: time, attitude, place, intensity, treatment, & cost.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173854
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2005 Jun;43(6):22-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Jane E Hamilton Wilson
Heather Hobbs
Suzanne Archie
Author Affiliation
Hamilton Health Sciences Centre and St Joseph's Healthcare, Ontario, Canada. jhamwil@rogers.com
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2005 Jun;43(6):22-8
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychiatry - organization & administration
Adolescent Psychology
Adult
Ambulatory Care Facilities - organization & administration
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Benchmarking
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Family - psychology
Humans
Ontario
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Patient Education as Topic - organization & administration
Patient Selection
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Professional-Patient Relations
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Recurrence
Self Care - methods
Social Support
Time Factors
Abstract
This article shares information about an exciting new approach in psychiatry. During the past 12 years, the authors have worked with young people experiencing their first episode of psychosis. It is clear that intervention at the earliest stages of psychotic illness allows clinicians to make a significant difference in the lives of young people and their families. This article summarizes current intervention strategies, which are considered best practice guidelines for early treatment.
Notes
Comment In: J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2005 Nov;43(11):1716350910
PubMed ID
16018131 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.