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[A developmental project at the pediatric department in Orebro. Physicians were asked to assess their own competence]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33689
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 Sep 2;95(36):3792-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2-1998

[A successful attempt with a consulting service for boys].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204687
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 Aug 5;95(32-33):3418-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-5-1998
Author
C. Gottlieb
I. Christiansen
C. Von Segebaden
M. Wiksten-Almströmer
Author Affiliation
Sophiahemmmet och kvinnokliniken, Karolinska Sjukhuset, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 Aug 5;95(32-33):3418-9
Date
Aug-5-1998
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
Contraception
Counseling
Humans
Male
Sex Education
Sweden
Abstract
As adolescence is a critical period of development, and as boys are less inclined than girls to approach the school facility for adolescent counselling, segregated consulting hours were introduced for boys to attract those with problems. The frequency of consultations by boys increased by 25 per cent, and 70 per cent of the boys reported a preference for the segregated consulting hours; 75 per cent appreciated the absence of girls from the waiting room; and of the 42 per cent with special preferences regarding the gender of the staff encountered, half reported preferring a man. Most of the boys presented with defined problems, though many revealed other problems, often relating to sexuality, in the course of consultation. The availability of segregated consulting hours for boys with adolescent problems is important, and often the only way to reach young boys who need help.
PubMed ID
9725958 View in PubMed
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Attitudes of Icelandic young people toward sexual and reproductive health services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199908
Source
Fam Plann Perspect. 1999 Nov-Dec;31(6):294-301
Publication Type
Article
Author
S S Bender
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing at the University of Iceland.
Source
Fam Plann Perspect. 1999 Nov-Dec;31(6):294-301
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - standards - supply & distribution
Adult
Attitude to Health
Contraception Behavior - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family Planning Services
Female
Humans
Iceland
Male
Sex Characteristics
Sexual Behavior - psychology
Abstract
Iceland has higher levels of fertility among both adult women and adolescents than many other western European countries. There is a need to make sexual and reproductive health services more accessible to teenagers in Iceland.
A descriptive, cross-sectional national postal survey was conducted in 1996 to explore the attitudes of 2,500 young people aged 17-20 toward sexual and reproductive health services in Iceland and to determine which factors might be of importance for the development of such services.
Icelandic adolescents want specialized sexual and reproductive health services offered within a broad-based service setting. Half of them would prefer to have these services located in a sexual and reproductive health clinic, and about one-third want such services to be located in community health centers. Having services that are free, that are anonymous and that do not require an appointment are important to teenagers who live in Reykjavik, but proximity and equal access to services are more highly valued by adolescents who live outside Reykjavik. Characteristics that young women, in particular, value include close proximity to services, access to a comfortable environment, a friendly staff, absolute confidentiality, and the ability to come with a friend and to have enough time for discussion. Adolescents who have already used contraceptive services mentioned that they need enough time for discussion and that they value high-quality client-provider interaction.
The attitudes of adolescents should be considered when specialized sexual and reproductive health services are developed for young people in Iceland. Specialized services that respond to the unique concerns of adolescents may increase their utilization of contraceptive methods and other reproductive health services.
PubMed ID
10614520 View in PubMed
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Beyond talking groups: strategies for improving adolescent health education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179576
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2004 May;25(5):481-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
Elizabeth Banister
Deborah Begoray
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. ebaniste@uvic.ca
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2004 May;25(5):481-8
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Health Services - standards
Adolescent Psychology
Attitude to Health
Body Image
British Columbia
Female
Focus Groups
Health Education - methods
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Questionnaires
Role Playing
Writing
Abstract
In a study that focused on adolescent girls' health issues within their dating relationships, we found that nonstructured focus group conversation can be augmented with structured strategies to generate a nonthreatening environment in which participants are enabled to co-create an understanding of their experiences. The use of free writing, role playing, and body tracing helped raise participants' awareness and understanding of some of their health behaviors. We suggest that these strategies can be used in health care and educational contexts to promote the health of adolescents. By sharing strategies between education and health care professionals, both professions will benefit.
PubMed ID
15204814 View in PubMed
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[Call for increased effort. Increased expectation pressure]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36096
Source
J Sykepleien. 1993 Oct 5;81(16):8-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-5-1993

Child and adolescent mental health policy and plans in Canada: an analytical review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145245
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2010 Feb;55(2):100-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Stan Kutcher
Mary Jane Hampton
Jeffrey Wilson
Author Affiliation
IWK Health Centre and Dalhousie University Department of Psychiatry, 5850-5980 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia. skutcher@dal.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2010 Feb;55(2):100-7
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - standards
Canada
Child
Female
Health Planning - standards
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Human Rights - standards
Humans
Information Systems - standards
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Mental health
Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Quality of Health Care - standards
Staff Development - standards
World Health Organization
Abstract
Child and adolescent mental disorders are common, with a substantial disease burden, yet services for young people are nationally inadequate. As services should be based on policies and (or) plans, we analyzed the availability and content of child and adolescent mental health policies and plans in all provinces and territories.
The World Health Organization (WHO) framework for Child and Adolescent Mental Health Policy and Plans was applied.
Four provinces in Canada have a child and adolescent mental health policy and (or) plan. The other provinces do not have a policy or plan in place, or else try to integrate these components into existing mental health strategies. Among the policies and plans that exist, there is substantial variability regarding content as well as degree of adherence to the WHO template. Five essential content areas: legislation and human rights, information systems, quality improvement, improving access to and use of psychotropics, and human resource development and training are poorly or very poorly addressed in existing policies and (or) plans.
This lack of specific policy and (or) plans for child and adolescent mental health care and the variability of content in plans that exist may help explain why child and adolescent mental health services are poorly developed across Canada. We suggest that a national child and adolescent mental health policy framework be developed for Canada so that the provinces and territories may be encouraged to create or amend their current child and adolescent mental health frameworks in a manner that may enhance national cohesion and commonly addresses service needs in this population.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Psychiatry. 2010 Nov;55(11):746; author reply 74621110467
PubMed ID
20181305 View in PubMed
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A comparison of adolescent and adult mothers' satisfaction with their postpartum nursing care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186389
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2002 Dec;34(4):117-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Wendy E Peterson
Alba DiCenso
Author Affiliation
Clinical Health Sciences (Nursing) Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. wpetersn@mcmaster.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2002 Dec;34(4):117-27
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - standards
Adult
Age Factors
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Marital status
Nursing Care - standards
Ontario
Patient satisfaction
Postnatal Care - standards
Quality of Health Care
Abstract
The purpose of this matched-cohort survey was to determine whether there is a difference between unmarried adolescent mothers and married adult mothers in terms of satisfaction with inpatient postpartum nursing care. Eighty adolescent/adult postpartum mother pairs from a mid-sized teaching hospital were matched according to parity, mode of delivery, infant health status, and infant feeding method. Adolescents scored lower than adults on both the Experiences of Nursing Care Scale and the Satisfaction with Nursing Care Scale of the Newcastle Satisfaction with Nursing Scales. Among the adolescents, post-caesarean mothers were less satisfied than mothers who had delivered vaginally. Adolescent mothers' dissatisfaction with nurse availability and nurse-client communication are possible explanatory factors. Future qualitative studies will inform the design of interventions to improve satisfaction among adolescent mothers.
PubMed ID
12619483 View in PubMed
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[Delinquent adolescents: health problems and health care guidelines for juvenile correctional facilities]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57448
Source
An Esp Pediatr. 2002 Oct;57(4):345-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
G. Oliván Gonzalvo
Author Affiliation
Servicios de Pediatría y Adolescencia, Instituto Aragonés de Servicios Sociales, Departamento de Salud, Consumo y Servicios Sociales, Gobierno de Aragón, Zaragoza, España. DROLIVAN@santandersupernet.com
Source
An Esp Pediatr. 2002 Oct;57(4):345-53
Date
Oct-2002
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - standards
English Abstract
Health status
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency
Mental health
Practice Guidelines
Prisons - standards
Spain
Abstract
The aim of this article was to provide an update that would serve to increase knowledge of health problems among juvenile delinquents before and during incarceration in juvenile correctional centers. Recommendations are made for the care of mental and physical health and for the health education of these teenagers that could be useful for health professionals providing health care to these teenagers while in custody as well as for those seeing them in the ambulatory setting.From the literature consulted, 63 % of studies have been performed in the United States, 24 % in Western Europe (Spain, United Kingdom, Holland, Belgium, Sweden, Finland), 8 % in Australia and 5 % in Canada. These studies show no appreciable qualitative differences in the health problems most frequently presented by these teenagers and there is agreement that the areas that should be prioritized are the provision of preventive and/or therapeutic dental care, as well as programs for psychiatric care, immunization, infectious diseases and health education.Failure to identify the health requirements of these teenagers and to provide early interventions can not only adversely effect their quality of life and their future physical, emotional and intellectual development but can also make their rehabilitation and reintegration into society more difficult.
PubMed ID
12392669 View in PubMed
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Empowering health promotion: a holistic approach in preventing sexually transmitted infections among first nations and inuit adolescents in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6013
Source
J Holist Nurs. 2004 Sep;22(3):254-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Audrey Steenbeek
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, University of British Columbia, Canada.
Source
J Holist Nurs. 2004 Sep;22(3):254-66
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology
Adolescent Health Services - standards
Adolescent Psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Health Promotion - standards
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Holistic Health
Holistic Nursing - standards
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - psychology
Inuits - psychology
Male
Needs Assessment
Nursing Methodology Research
Sex Education - standards
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - ethnology - nursing - prevention & control
Abstract
Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) such as gonorrhea and chlamydia, among others, are significant health concerns for Canadian aboriginal (i.e., First Nations, Inuit) adolescents. This is further compounded by ineffective prevention and promotion strategies that were designed to lessen the incidence of STIs in this population. Structure and content of health service programs are crucial considerations in STI prevention because even well-constructed and carefully implemented programs may have very little impact on aboriginal youth if these programs are not culturally sensitive and specific to individual adolescent's needs. Furthermore, because components of sexual and reproductive health are inextricably linked to empowerment and equality between the sexes, holistic health nurses need to develop strategies that increase self-esteem, self-advocacy, and healthy choices among aboriginal adolescents.
PubMed ID
15296578 View in PubMed
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[Future of school health services. Concentrate on the good parts of Swedish health care!]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32933
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Jan 26;97(4):352, 355
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-26-2000
Author
T. Arman
Author Affiliation
Barnens sjukhus på Huddinge sjukhus
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Jan 26;97(4):352, 355
Date
Jan-26-2000
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - standards - trends
Child
Child Health Services - standards - trends
Humans
School Health Services - standards - trends
Sweden
PubMed ID
10684232 View in PubMed
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25 records – page 1 of 3.