Skip header and navigation

Refine By

512 records – page 1 of 52.

Predicting dropout in male youth soccer using the theory of planned behavior.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174859
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2005 Jun;15(3):188-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Catalin M Nache
Michael Bar-Eli
Claire Perrin
Louis Laurencelle
Author Affiliation
Research Center in Physical and Sports Activities (CRAPS), University of Caen, France. nache@rocketmail.com
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2005 Jun;15(3):188-97
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Attitude
Canada
Humans
Male
Motivation
Questionnaires
Soccer
Abstract
This investigation prospectively predicted dropout among young soccer players, using the theory of planned behavior (TPB). First, behavioral beliefs required to develop a TPB-questionnaire were elicited from 53 male soccer players, aged 13-15 years. Second, at the beginning of the soccer season, 354 different male soccer players aged 13-15 years completed this questionnaire, thereby assessing direct dimensions (intention, attitude, subjective norm, perceived control) and indirect dimensions (attitudinal, normative and control beliefs) derived from TPB. Nine months later--upon termination of the soccer season--these players were classified into 323 perserverers and 31 dropouts, with TPB being applied prospectively to predict these two groups. For both direct and indirect dimensions, between-group comparisons revealed significant differences in favor of the perseverers. Discriminant analyses revealed five measures (intention, attitude, subjective norm, a normative belief, and a control belief), which enabled a 22.1% a priori dropout prediction when used within a suitable equation. In conclusion, TPB may have a promising application to prospectively discriminate dropouts from perseverers, providing a potential predictive a priori classification model for sport participation.
PubMed ID
15885041 View in PubMed
Less detail

Male adolescents' reasons for participating in physical activity, barriers to participation, and suggestions for increasing participation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175030
Source
Adolescence. 2005;40(157):155-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Kenneth R Allison
John J M Dwyer
Ellie Goldenberg
Allan Fein
Karen K Yoshida
Marie Boutilier
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, McMurrich Building, Room 109B, 12 Queen's Park Crescent, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8. k.allison@utoronto.ca
Source
Adolescence. 2005;40(157):155-70
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology
Canada
Exercise - physiology - psychology
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Abstract
This study explored male adolescents' reasons for participating in moderate and vigorous physical activity, perceived barriers to moderate and vigorous physical activity, and suggestions as to what can be done to increase participation in physical activity. A total of 26 male 15- and 16-year-old adolescents participated in focus group sessions, which were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim; qualitative software facilitated data analysis. A constant comparison approach was used to inductively develop themes. It was found that participants engaged in physical activity for both intrinsic and extrinsic reasons. Their perceived barriers to physical activity included both internal factors (individual characteristics, lower priority for physical activity, and involvement in technology-related activities) and external factors (the influence of peers and family, lack of time, and inaccessibility and cost of facilities). Participants suggested that physical activity be promoted more in the community and that an environment more supportive of physical activity be developed. Results suggest that a variety of strategies should be used to help male adolescents maintain or increase participation in moderate and vigorous physical activity.
PubMed ID
15861623 View in PubMed
Less detail

The pit and the pendulum: the impact on teen smokers of including a designated smoking area in school tobacco control policy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156079
Source
Health Educ Res. 2008 Dec;23(6):1008-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
L E Baillie
C Y Lovato
E. Taylor
M B Rutherford
M. Smith
Author Affiliation
Prevention Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Kelowna, BC V1Y 5L3, Canada. lbaillie@bccancer.bc.ca
Source
Health Educ Res. 2008 Dec;23(6):1008-15
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
British Columbia
Humans
Schools - organization & administration
Smoking - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
Thirty per cent of school districts in British Columbia do not ban smoking outright on school grounds, and in several instances, smoking is permitted in smoking pits, regardless of school district policy. While there is evidence to suggest that enforcing a tobacco-free environment for students does reduce adolescent smoking rates, the concomitant safety and discipline problems it creates for school staff and administration are demanding and complex, and may override concerns regarding student smoking. This study uses a qualitative approach to explore the meanings that students place on tobacco control policy and the impact that these meanings have on their own smoking behaviours. We found that students were surprised and concerned that smoking was permitted on school property and that it negatively impacted their own tobacco prevention/control/cessation attempts.
PubMed ID
18640969 View in PubMed
Less detail

A developmental etiological model for drug abuse in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291299
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2017 10 01; 179:220-228
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-01-2017
Author
Kenneth S Kendler
Henrik Ohlsson
Alexis C Edwards
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA; Department of Human and Molecular Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA. Electronic address: kenneth.kendler@vcuhealth.org.
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2017 10 01; 179:220-228
Date
10-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Humans
Male
Registries
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - etiology
Sweden
Abstract
We attempt to develop a relatively comprehensive structural model of risk factors for drug abuse (DA) in Swedish men that illustrates developmental and mediational processes.
We examined 20 risk factors for DA in 48,369 men undergoing conscription examinations in 1969-70 followed until 2011 when 2.34% (n=1134) of them had DA ascertained in medical, criminal and pharmacy registries. Risk factors were organized into four developmental tiers reflecting i) birth, ii) childhood/early adolescence, iii) late adolescence, and iv) young adulthood. Structural equational model fitting was performed using Mplus.
The best fitting model explained 47.8% of the variance in DA. The most prominent predictors, in order, were: early adolescent externalizing behavior, early adult criminal behavior, early adolescent internalizing behavior, early adult unemployment, early adult alcohol use disorder, and late adolescent drug use. Two major inter-connecting pathways emerged reflecting i) genetic/familial risk and ii) family dysfunction and psychosocial adversity. Generated on a first and tested on a second random half of the sample, a model from these variables predicted DA with an ROC area under the curve of 83.6%. Fifty-nine percent of DA cases arose from subjects in the top decile of risk.
DA in men is a highly multifactorial syndrome with risk arising from familial-genetic, psychosocial, behavioral and psychological factors acting and interacting over development. Among the multiple predisposing factors for DA, a range of psychosocial adversities, externalizing psychopathology and lack of social constraints in early adulthood are predominant.
Notes
Cites: Psychol Bull. 1992 Jul;112(1):64-105 PMID 1529040
Cites: Behav Genet. 2016 Mar;46(2):183-92 PMID 26494460
Cites: Addiction. 2004 Oct;99(10):1298-305 PMID 15369568
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2000 Oct;57(10):953-9 PMID 11015813
Cites: Pediatrics. 2003 Mar;111(3):564-72 PMID 12612237
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1996 Dec;35(12):1584-92 PMID 8973064
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005 Jun;62(6):617-27 PMID 15939839
Cites: Addiction. 2008 May;103 Suppl 1:100-8 PMID 18426543
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2011 Sep 1;117(2-3):85-101 PMID 21377813
Cites: Monogr Soc Res Child Dev. 2009;74(3):vii-119 PMID 19930521
Cites: Am J Med Genet. 1996 Sep 20;67(5):473-7 PMID 8886164
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2004 Sep;61(9):922-8 PMID 15351771
Cites: Addiction. 2014 Feb;109(2):284-94 PMID 24261668
Cites: Multivariate Behav Res. 1990 Apr 1;25(2):173-80 PMID 26794479
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2003 Sep;60(9):929-37 PMID 12963675
Cites: Psychol Med. 2016 Oct;46(13):2759-70 PMID 27443147
Cites: Twin Res. 2004 Feb;7(1):72-81 PMID 15053856
Cites: Science. 1977 Apr 8;196(4286):129-36 PMID 847460
Cites: Twin Res Hum Genet. 2011 Feb;14(1):1-15 PMID 21314251
Cites: Psychol Med. 2014 Feb;44(3):647-55 PMID 23574685
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2005 Mar;162(3):433-40 PMID 15741457
Cites: Eur Neuropsychopharmacol. 2014 Nov;24(11):1793-7 PMID 25224107
Cites: J Abnorm Psychol. 2006 Feb;115(1):26-39 PMID 16492093
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2012 Jul;69(7):690-7 PMID 22393206
Cites: Science. 1975 Nov 28;190(4217):912-4 PMID 1188374
Cites: Annu Rev Clin Psychol. 2008;4:325-48 PMID 18370620
Cites: Psychol Rev. 2006 Jan;113(1):101-31 PMID 16478303
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2002 Jul;159(7):1133-45 PMID 12091191
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 2005 Jun;66(6):677-85 PMID 15960559
Cites: Prev Sci. 2000 Mar;1(1):3-13 PMID 11507792
Cites: Psychol Addict Behav. 2003 Dec;17(4):293-302 PMID 14640825
Cites: Mol Psychiatry. 2009 Nov;14(11):1051-66 PMID 18427559
Cites: Psychol Med. 2015 Mar;45(4):855-64 PMID 25229163
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2001 Jul;158(7):1091-8 PMID 11431231
Cites: Alcohol Res. 2012;34(3):318-24 PMID 23134047
Cites: BMJ. 2009 Feb 24;338:b496 PMID 19244221
PubMed ID
28806639 View in PubMed
Less detail

The declining trend in Swedish youth drinking: collectivity or polarization?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267304
Source
Addiction. 2014 Sep;109(9):1437-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Thor Norström
Johan Svensson
Source
Addiction. 2014 Sep;109(9):1437-46
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Alcohol consumption among youth in Sweden has declined markedly during the last decade. This study aims to tackle the following research questions: (i) how is the decrease in drinking distributed across consumption categories; and (ii) is the pattern of change in consumption consistent with Skog's theory of the collectivity of drinking behaviour?
We analysed data from the nationally representative annual school survey of alcohol and drug habits among Swedish 9th-grade students (aged 15-16 years) covering the period 2000-12 (n?˜?5000/year). Respondents were divided into seven drinking groups based on their relative ranking on consumption, which was measured by beverage-specific quantity and frequency items summarized into a measure of overall drinking in litres of 100% alcohol per year. In addition, the mean number of heavy episodic drinking occasions (HED) was computed for each drinking group.
The decline in consumption among Swedish youth was mirrored in all seven drinking groups, although the relative decrease was smaller for heavy drinkers (top 5%) than for light drinkers (below the median). Among the top 5%, the average annual decrease was 2% (P?=?0.027), while the corresponding figure for light drinkers was 28.9% (P?
Notes
Comment In: Addiction. 2014 Sep;109(9):1459-6125103102
Comment In: Addiction. 2014 Aug;109(8):1384-524942047
Comment In: Addiction. 2014 Aug;109(8):1385-624942158
Comment In: Addiction. 2014 Sep;109(9):1456-825103101
PubMed ID
24521087 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does the direction of effects in the association between depressive symptoms and health-risk behaviors differ by behavior? A longitudinal study across the high school years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127783
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2012 Feb;50(2):140-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Setareh Hooshmand
Teena Willoughby
Marie Good
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2012 Feb;50(2):140-7
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Depression - physiopathology
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Ontario
Risk-Taking
Abstract
Adolescence is associated with the onset of depressive symptoms as well as significant increases in health-risk behaviors. Potential explanations for the direction of effects in the association between depressive symptoms and health-risk behaviors include the self-medication/acting out hypothesis (i.e., early depressive symptoms predict increases in risk behaviors over time) and the failure hypothesis (i.e., early participation in health-risk behaviors predicts increases in depressive symptoms over time). The purpose of the present longitudinal study was to assess these competing hypotheses across the high school years, and to examine whether the direction of effects (and therefore the self-medication/acting out and failure hypotheses) may differ depending on the type of risk behavior under consideration.
The sample consisted of 4,412 adolescents (49% female) who were followed up from grade nine to 12. Adolescents reported on their depressive symptoms and six health-risk behaviors (frequency of alcohol use, amount of alcohol consumed per drinking episode, cigarette smoking, marijuana use, hard drug use, and delinquency). Analyses were conducted with dual trajectory growth curve modeling.
Adolescents who had higher depressive symptoms in grade nine reported faster increases than their peers in smoking, marijuana, and hard drug use across the high school years, supporting the self-medication hypothesis. The failure hypothesis was not supported.
The results are important because they suggest that by targeting depressive symptoms during early adolescence, treatment programs may prevent increases in the frequency of these risk behaviors later in adolescence.
PubMed ID
22265109 View in PubMed
Less detail

Swedish and English adolescents' attitudes toward the community presence of people with disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205028
Source
J Intellect Disabil Res. 1998 Jun;42 ( Pt 3):246-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
R P Hastings
K E Sjöström
S V Stevenage
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Southampton, Hampshire, England.
Source
J Intellect Disabil Res. 1998 Jun;42 ( Pt 3):246-53
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Attitude
Deinstitutionalization
Female
Great Britain
Humans
Intellectual Disability
Mainstreaming (Education)
Male
Sweden
Abstract
Predictions derived from North American formulations of normalization suggest that contemporary care policies for people with intellectual disabilities will have a positive impact on societal perceptions of this group. To test this, adolescents' attitudes towards the community presence of people with disabilities in a normalization-advanced country (Sweden) and a relatively less normalization-advanced country (England) were compared. It was expected that Swedish and English participants would hold equally positive views of people with a non-intellectual disability, whereas English participants would hold less positive views than Swedish participants of people with an intellectual disability. The results gave limited support to this expectation when dimensions of participants' attitudes derived from a factor analysis were analysed. These results are discussed with reference to other factors that may influence attitudes in the two countries. In addition, implications for future research and practice are outlined.
PubMed ID
9678409 View in PubMed
Less detail

The social determinants of adolescent smoking in Russia in 2004.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140313
Source
Int J Public Health. 2010 Dec;55(6):619-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Olga Kislitsyna
Andrew Stickley
Anna Gilmore
Martin McKee
Author Affiliation
Institute for Social and Economic Studies of Population, Russian Academy of Sciences, 32 Nakhimovskii Prospect, Moscow, 117218, Russia. olga.kislitsyna@gmail.com
Source
Int J Public Health. 2010 Dec;55(6):619-26
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Family Relations
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Russia - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
To determine the prevalence of adolescent smoking in the Russian Federation and examine what factors are associated with it.
Data were drawn from Round 13 of the Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (RLMS) carried out in 2004. The sample consists of 815 adolescents (430 boys, 385 girls) aged 14-17 years who answered questions about their health behaviours.
Smoking was more prevalent among boys than girls (26.1 vs. 5.7%). Maternal smoking and adolescent alcohol use were associated with smoking among both sexes. The self-assessment of one's socioeconomic position as unfavourable was associated with girls' smoking, while living in a disrupted family, physical inactivity and having a low level of self-esteem were predictive of boys' smoking.
The family environment appears to be an important determinant of adolescent smoking in Russia. In particular, boys and girls may be modelling the negative health behaviour lifestyles of their parents, with unhealthy behaviours clustering. Efforts to reduce adolescent smoking in Russia must address the negative effects emanating from the parental home whilst also addressing associated behaviours such as alcohol use.
PubMed ID
20890629 View in PubMed
Less detail

Brief report: Acceptance of physical violence (APV) among adolescents in a Norwegian normal sample; statistical description of the assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174518
Source
J Adolesc. 2005 Jun;28(3):425-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
F. Naevdal
Author Affiliation
Bergen College (HiB), Faculty of Education, Postbox 7030, Bergen N-5020, Norway. fne@hib.no
Source
J Adolesc. 2005 Jun;28(3):425-31
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Attitude - ethnology
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Psychometrics - methods
Social Perception
Violence - psychology
Abstract
The article presents a psychometric description of 11 statements related to use of physical violence. The items were tested in a normal sample (N=1700, age: 15-16) from urban and rural areas in Western Norway. The internal reliability was alpha=0.86, and the factor analysis resulted in two factors. Boys had higher mean scores than girls. Self-reported violence was predicted by acceptance of physical violence.
PubMed ID
15925692 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The effect of abnormal interests on social ability of mentally ill children and adolescents].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131018
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2011;111(8 Pt 1):9-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
I I Sergeev
R V Deich
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2011;111(8 Pt 1):9-13
Date
2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Mentally Ill Persons - psychology
Moscow
Social Conformity
Abstract
Authors have studied 62 patients, aged 4-16 years old, who were admitted to the Moscow Children's Psychiatric Hospital ?6. Patients had the following types of pathological interests depending on their context: intellectual interests, creative modeling, passionate, animalistic and cult. Three clinical variants of pathological interests depending on their structure have been singled out: «narrow», «overvalued» and «overvalued-delusional». These variants differed by the frequency and severity of basic components: affective, ideatory, specific activity drive. The distinct social-maladaptation effect of abnormal interests in children and adolescents was found. Its intensity depended on above-mentioned variants. Narrow abnormal interests defined moderate social disability which was revealed in the family circle. Overvalued interests were characterized by a considerable disability which included disorders of both family and school life. Overvalued-delusional interests predetermined severe disability of children and adolescent.
PubMed ID
21946132 View in PubMed
Less detail

512 records – page 1 of 52.