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[40 percent of high school pupils abuse alcohol. Strong connection with exposure to physical or sexual violence].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129824
Source
Lakartidningen. 2011 Aug 24-30;108(34):1556-9
Publication Type
Article

Adolescent smoking and family structure in Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31283
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2003 Jan;56(1):41-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Dawn Griesbach
Amanda Amos
Candace Currie
Author Affiliation
Child and Adolescent Health Research Unit (CAHRU), Department of PE, Sport and Leisure Studies, University of Edinburgh, St. Leonard's Land, Holyrood Road, EH8 8AQ, Edinburgh, UK. dawn.griesbach@isd.csa.scot.nhs.uk
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2003 Jan;56(1):41-52
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Austria - epidemiology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Denmark - epidemiology
Europe - epidemiology
Family - ethnology
Finland - epidemiology
Germany - epidemiology
Health Behavior - ethnology
Humans
Income
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Scotland - epidemiology
Smoking - ethnology
Social Change
Social Class
Wales - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper examines the relationship between family structure and smoking among 15-year-old adolescents in seven European countries. It also investigates the association between family structure and a number of known smoking risk factors including family socio-economic status, the adolescent's disposable income, parental smoking and the presence of other smokers in the adolescent's home. Findings are based on 1998 survey data from a cross-national study of health behaviours among children and adolescents. Family structure was found to be significantly associated with smoking among 15-year-olds in all countries, with smoking prevalence lowest among adolescents in intact families and highest among adolescents in stepfamilies. Multivariate analysis showed that several risk factors were associated with higher smoking prevalences in all countries, but that even after these other factors were taken into account, there was an increased likelihood of smoking among adolescents in stepfamilies. Further research is needed to determine the possible reasons for this association.
PubMed ID
12435550 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use beliefs and behaviors among high school students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203376
Source
J Adolesc Health. 1999 Jan;24(1):48-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
L. Feldman
B. Harvey
P. Holowaty
L. Shortt
Author Affiliation
East York Health Unit, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Adolesc Health. 1999 Jan;24(1):48-58
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Confidence Intervals
Female
Humans
Life Style - ethnology
Logistic Models
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Parents
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To identify specific alcohol use beliefs and behaviors among local high school students; to determine whether relationships exist between alcohol use and various sociodemographic and lifestyle behaviors; and to assist in the development and implementation of alcohol abuse prevention programs.
This cross-sectional study involved the completion of a questionnaire by 1236 Grade 9-13 students (86% response rate) from 62 randomly selected classrooms in three Canadian urban schools. Data analyzed here are part of a larger lifestyle survey.
A total of 24% of students reported never having tasted alcohol, 22% have tasted alcohol but do not currently drink, 39% are current moderate drinkers, 11% are current heavy drinkers (five or more drinks on one occasion at least once a month), and 5% did not answer. Reasons stated most often for not drinking were "bad for health" and "upbringing," while reasons stated most often for drinking were "enjoy it" and "to get in a party mood." Student drinking patterns were significantly related to gender, ethnicity, grade, and the reported drinking habits of parents and friends. Older male adolescents who describe their ethnicity as Canadian are at higher risk for heavy drinking than students who are younger or female, or identify their ethnicity as European or Asian. Current heavy drinkers are at higher risk than other students for engaging in other high-risk behaviors such as drinking and driving, being a passenger in a car when the driver is intoxicated, and daily smoking.
Heavy alcohol use in adolescents remains an important community health concern. Older self-described Canadian and Canadian-born male adolescents are at higher risk for heavy drinking. Current and heavy drinking rises significantly between Grades 9 and 12. Students who drink heavily are more likely to drink and drive, to smoke daily, and to have friends and parents who drink alcohol.
PubMed ID
9890365 View in PubMed
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BeLieving in Native Girls: characteristics from a baseline assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124562
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2012;19(1):15-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Deborah Scott
Aleisha Langhorne
Author Affiliation
Sage Associates, Inc., Houston, TX 77007, USA. dsscott@sageways.com
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2012;19(1):15-36
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Adolescent Psychology - statistics & numerical data
Alaska
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Surveys
Homeless Youth - ethnology - psychology
Humans
Indians, North American
Juvenile Delinquency - ethnology - prevention & control
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sexual Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Violence - ethnology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
BeLieving In Native Girls (BLING) is a juvenile delinquency and HIV intervention at a residential boarding school for American Indian/Alaska Native adolescent girls ages 12-20 years. In 2010, 115 participants completed baseline surveys to identify risk and protective factors. Initial findings are discussed regarding a variety of topics, including demographics and general characteristics, academic engagement, home neighborhood characteristics and safety, experience with and perceptions of gang involvement, problem-solving skills, self-esteem, depression, sexual experiences and risk-taking behaviors, substance abuse, and dating violence.
PubMed ID
22569723 View in PubMed
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A cross-cultural study of gambling behaviour among adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165929
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2007 Mar;23(1):25-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Stephen Ellenbogen
Rina Gupta
Jeffrey L Derevensky
Author Affiliation
International Centre for Youth Gambling Problems and High-Risk Behaviors, McGill University, 3724 McTavish Street, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Stephen.Ellenbogen@mcgill.ca
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2007 Mar;23(1):25-39
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Behavior, Addictive - diagnosis - epidemiology - ethnology - psychology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Gambling - psychology
Humans
Impulse Control Disorders - epidemiology
Male
Peer Group
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk-Taking
Self Concept
Social Behavior
Students - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study investigated whether the prevalence of weekly and problem gambling among youth varied according to cultural affiliation. A convenience sample of 1,265 Quebec high school students aged 12-18 was divided into three linguistic groupings: Anglophone (English), Francophone (French), and Allophone (other). Results revealed that the Allophone grouping contained the highest proportion of youth who gambled on a weekly basis and who reported gambling problems, followed by the Anglophone, and finally the Francophone groupings. Acculturation difficulties were associated with problem gambling. Few meaningful between-group differences were found with respect to factors related to problem gambling (i.e., comorbidity with other risk factors, coping, family functioning and resiliency). The results are discussed with respect to the influence of cultural background on gambling behavior.
PubMed ID
17191144 View in PubMed
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Drinking pattern among adolescents with immigrant and Norwegian backgrounds: a two-way influence?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9114
Source
Addiction. 2005 Oct;100(10):1453-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Ellen J Amundsen
Ingeborg Rossow
Svetlana Skurtveit
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Alcohol and Drug Research, Oslo, Norway. eja@sirus.no
Source
Addiction. 2005 Oct;100(10):1453-63
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - ethnology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Humans
India - ethnology
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Students - psychology
Abstract
AIMS: To assess the association between drinking behaviour among adolescents with both immigrant and native backgrounds with aspects of acculturation. DESIGN: Cross-sectional school survey among 15-16 year olds. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: All students, a total of 8361, in 10th grade during spring 2000 and 2001 in Oslo, Norway with response rate 88.3%. The sample consisted of 1213 students with an immigrant background and 4627 students with a Norwegian background. MEASUREMENTS: Indicators of the length of the acculturation process were assessed as first versus second generation and in terms of length of stay in Norway. The proportion of Muslim students in school was an indicator of social environment 'dryness'. Drinking behaviour was assessed as drinking alcohol ever, drinking frequency and intoxication frequency. FINDINGS: A smaller proportion of immigrant students were current drinkers, frequent drinkers and drank to intoxication compared with adolescents with a Norwegian background. Adjusted two-level analyses showed that alcohol drinking was less common among immigrant students with a short stay in Norway and with a large proportion of Muslim students in school. In those with a Norwegian background there was a larger proportion of abstainers, and those who drank did so less frequently and were less frequently intoxicated the larger the proportion of Muslim students there was in their school. CONCLUSION: Drinking behaviour among adolescents in a multicultural and heterogeneous society seems to reflect a bi-directional acculturation process where the majority population tend to adapt to the behaviours of the immigrant population which in turn, to a varying degree, tends to adapt to the behaviour of the majority population.
PubMed ID
16185207 View in PubMed
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Employing a youth-led adult-guided framework: "Why Drive High?" social marketing campaign.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131746
Source
Fam Community Health. 2011 Oct-Dec;34(4):319-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
Terry-Lynne Marko
Tyler Watt
Author Affiliation
Injury Prevention Team, Ottawa Public Health, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Terry-Lynne.Marko@ottawa.ca
Source
Fam Community Health. 2011 Oct-Dec;34(4):319-30
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Adult
Attitude to Health
Automobile Driving
Decision Making
Focus Groups
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Marijuana Abuse - prevention & control - psychology
Ontario
Social Marketing
Young Adult
Abstract
The "Drugged Driving Kills project: Why Drive High?" social marketing campaign was developed and implemented by youth leaders and adult facilitators from public and community health to increase youth awareness of the adverse effects of marijuana on driving. The youth-led adult-guided project was founded on the Holden's youth empowerment conceptual model. This article reports on the results of the focus group evaluation, conducted to determine to what extent the tailored youth-led adult-guided framework for the "Why Drive High?" social marketing campaign provided an environment for youth leadership development.
PubMed ID
21881419 View in PubMed
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Factors Associated With Early Sexual Experience Among American Indian and Alaska Native Youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272505
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2015 Sep;57(3):334-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Christine M Markham
Stephanie Craig Rushing
Cornelia Jessen
Travis L Lane
Gwenda Gorman
Amanda Gaston
Taija Koogei Revels
Jennifer Torres
Jennifer Williamson
Elizabeth R Baumler
Robert C Addy
Melissa F Peskin
Ross Shegog
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2015 Sep;57(3):334-41
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Alaska
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Logistic Models
Male
Reproductive health
Risk-Taking
Sexual Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Underage Drinking - psychology
Abstract
American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth experience disparities associated with sexual and reproductive health, including early age of sexual initiation. Identifying factors that are most proximally related to early sexual intercourse and that are modifiable through health promotion interventions may help to reduce these disparities. Using a multisystem approach, we assessed individual (biological, psychological, and behavioral), familial, and extrafamilial (peer behavioral) factors associated with lifetime sexual experience among AI/AN early adolescents living in three geographically dispersed U.S. regions.
We analyzed cross-sectional data from 537 AI/AN youth aged 12-14 years, recruited from 27 study sites in Alaska, Arizona, and the Pacific Northwest. We used multilevel logistic regression models to estimate associations between independent variables and lifetime sexual intercourse (oral and/or vaginal sex) individually, within discrete systems, and across systems.
The analytical sample was 55.1% female, with a mean age of 13.2 years (standard deviation = 1.06 years); 6.5% were sexually experienced. In the final model, we found that lower next-year intentions to have oral or vaginal sex (psychological factors), avoidance of risky situations, and nonuse of alcohol (behavioral factors) were associated with lower odds of lifetime sexual intercourse (all p = .01). No other variables were significantly associated with lifetime sexual intercourse.
Interventions that reduce sexual intentions, exposure to risky situations, and alcohol use may help to delay sexual initiation among AI/AN early adolescents.
PubMed ID
26299560 View in PubMed
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Familial and socioregional environmental effects on abstinence from alcohol at age sixteen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202260
Source
J Stud Alcohol Suppl. 1999 Mar;13:63-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
R J Rose
J. Kaprio
T. Winter
M. Koskenvuo
R J Viken
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Indiana University, Bloomington 47405-1301, USA.
Source
J Stud Alcohol Suppl. 1999 Mar;13:63-74
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology - ethnology
Humans
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Parents - psychology
Sibling Relations
Temperance - psychology
Abstract
This study identifies, in genetically informative data, familial and socioregional environmental influences on abstinence from alcohol at age 16.
Data are from FinnTwin 16, a population-based study of five consecutive birth cohorts of Finnish twins (N = 5,747 twin individuals), yielding 2,711 pairs of known zygosity. Measures of alcohol use, embedded into a health-habits questionnaire, were taken from earlier epidemiological research with nontwin Finnish adolescents. The questionnaire was administered sequentially to all twins as they reached age 16. Separate questionnaires, including measures of alcohol use and screening questions for alcohol problems, were received from 5,243 of the twins' parents.
Abstinence from alcohol to age 16 exhibits very significant familial aggregation, largely due to nongenetic influences. Abstinence rates are influenced by socioregional variation, sibling interaction effects and parental drinking patterns. Sibling and parental influences are greater in some regional environments than in others: the relative likelihood that a twin abstains, given that the co-twin does, or that both parents do, is shown to be modulated by socioregional variation.
Environmental contexts affect the likelihood of maintaining abstinence from alcohol to midadolescence, and socioregional variation modulates influences of siblings and parents. The results illustrate how genetically informative data can inform prevention research by identifying target variables for intervention efforts.
PubMed ID
10225489 View in PubMed
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Health-related quality of life in a Norwegian sample of healthy adolescents: some psychometric properties of CHQ-CF87-N in relation to KINDL-N.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70412
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2006 Apr;38(4):416-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Sølvi Helseth
Thorleif Lund
Knut-Andreas Christophersen
Author Affiliation
Oslo University College, Faculty of Nursing, Oslo, Norway. solvi.helseth@su.hio.no
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2006 Apr;38(4):416-25
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Norway - ethnology
Psychometrics
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
PURPOSE: As part of a large investigation of Norwegian adolescents, with an overall aim of developing methods to promote health-related quality of life (HRQOL), an adequate generic measure of HRQOL was needed. Hence the purpose of the study was to compare some of the psychometric qualities of the CHQ-CF87-N and KINDL-N in a sample of healthy adolescents and to discuss the feasibility of the 2 instruments in research and clinical settings. METHODS: Two hundred twenty-nine healthy adolescents completed the questionnaires. The internal consistency reliability and the distributional properties of the CHQ-N and KINDL-N were compared. Factor analysis was performed for the CHQ-N scales separately, as well as for the CHQ-N and KINDL-N scales combined. RESULTS: The reliability of the scales of the CHQ-N was satisfactory, and generally was better for the CHQ-N scales than for the KINDL-N scales. The distributional properties of the KINDL-N scales were on average better than the CHQ-N scales. Factor analysis of the CHQ-N scales resulted in 3 interpretable factors, while analysis of the CHQ-N and KINDL-N scales combined comprised 4 interpretable factors. A 1-factor solution was in both cases interpreted as a general health-related quality of life factor. CONCLUSIONS: The CHQ-N and KINDL-N may be regarded as adequate instruments to measure HRQOL in healthy adolescents, but to some extent they cover different dimensions of health and quality of life. The KINDL-N focuses on the psychosocial aspects, while CHQ-N covers more dimensions and has stronger focus on the physical aspects. Thus the instruments have different applications in both research and clinical settings.
PubMed ID
16549303 View in PubMed
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24 records – page 1 of 3.