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A 10 mg warfarin initiation nomogram is safe and effective in outpatients starting oral anticoagulant therapy for venous thromboembolism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153058
Source
Thromb Res. 2009 Jul;124(3):275-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Katherine Monkman
Alejandro Lazo-Langner
Michael J Kovacs
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Thromb Res. 2009 Jul;124(3):275-80
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care - methods
Anticoagulants - administration & dosage
Comorbidity
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Hemorrhage - mortality
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Treatment Outcome
Venous Thromboembolism - drug therapy - mortality
Warfarin - administration & dosage
Young Adult
Abstract
The optimal means of initiating warfarin therapy for acute venous thromboembolism in the outpatient setting remains controversial. We have previously demonstrated the efficacy of a 10 mg initiation nomogram in a randomized controlled trial; however, some clinicians remain reluctant to use this nomogram due to a fear of potential increased bleeding. To review the safety and efficacy of a 10 mg warfarin nomogram we conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients prospectively treated for venous thromboembolism according to a 10 mg nomogram in an outpatient thrombosis clinic. All patients received standard treatment with low molecular weight heparin for 5 to 7 days and warfarin for at least 3 months. Four-hundred and fourteen patients were included in the analysis, of whom 295 (71%) fully adhered to the nomogram. In the whole cohort, 8 patients (1.9%) experienced recurrent thrombosis, 4 (0.97%) suffered a major bleeding event, and 3 (0.72%) suffered a minor bleeding event. There were no deaths related to thrombosis or bleeding. Four patients (0.97%) died from unrelated causes. Twenty-two (5.3%) patients experienced an INR > or =5.0 in the first 8 days of therapy, and none of these patients experienced a bleeding event. Eighty-four percent of patients achieved a therapeutic INR by day 5. In outpatients, a 10 mg nomogram results in timely achievement of a therapeutic INR with an acceptable incidence of bleeding and recurrent thromboembolism.
PubMed ID
19155056 View in PubMed
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Abortion induced with methotrexate and misoprostol: a comparison of various protocols.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209155
Source
Contraception. 1997 Mar;55(3):159-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
E R Wiebe
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, University of British Colubmia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Contraception. 1997 Mar;55(3):159-63
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortifacient Agents, Nonsteroidal - administration & dosage
Abortion, Induced - methods - statistics & numerical data
Administration, Intravaginal
Administration, Oral
Adult
Canada
Cohort Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Double-Blind Method
Female
Humans
Injections, Intramuscular
Methotrexate - administration & dosage
Misoprostol - administration & dosage
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Time Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
Seven hundred fifty-six women had abortions induced with methotrexate and misoprostol. Various protocols were compared. In Group 1, phase 1, after receiving 50 mg/m2 methotrexate IM, 289 women were randomized to receive either 750 or 500 micrograms of vaginal misoprostol. In Group 1, phase 2, 84 women who had failed to abort after one dose of misoprostol were randomized to receive either vaginal or oral routes for the second dose of misoprostol given on Day 8. In Group 2, a cohort of 226 women who received 60 mg/m2 methotrexate were compared to the 289 women who received 50 mg/m2 in Group 1. There were no differences in rates of effectiveness in the various trial groups. Side effects were greater with 60 mg/m2 of methotrexate. In Group 3, a cohort of 241 women received the misoprostol in three vaginal doses 8 hr apart starting on Day 5, and were compared to the 289 women in Group 1 receiving one vaginal dose. In women whose medical abortion failed, fetuses were found to have limb abnormalities In the total group of 756 women, 88.8% aborted successfully without surgical aspiration, with only minor side effects, and the acceptance rate was high. This study indicates that medical abortions induced with methotrexate and misoprostol are safe and effective, but more research is needed to find a more effective protocol.
PubMed ID
9115004 View in PubMed
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[A case report. Rosiglitazone treatment was highly effective yet had to be terminated]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47573
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 Jan 31;99(5):407-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-31-2002
Author
Martin Ridderstråle
Leif Groop
Author Affiliation
Endokrinologiska kliniken, Universitetssjukhuset MAS, Malmö. martin.ridderstrale@endo.mas.lu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 Jan 31;99(5):407-10
Date
Jan-31-2002
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - drug therapy
English Abstract
Female
Heart Failure, Congestive - complications - drug therapy
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - drug effects
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - administration & dosage - contraindications
Insulin - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Thiazoles - administration & dosage - contraindications
Thiazolidinediones
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The thiazolidinediones were introduced as oral hypoglycemic drugs in Sweden during the fall of 2000. A case is reported in which a woman with insulin-dependent type-2 diabetes and both macro- and microangiopathy and pronounced insulin resistance was treated with rosiglitazone (Avandia). Within three months insulin doses could be reduced by 36% (from 176 to 112 units insulin daily) and concomitantly Ery-HbA1c was reduced from 8.4 to 5.3%. In spite of this dramatic effect on glucose homeostasis administration of the drug had to be discontinued due to critical congestive heart failure.
PubMed ID
11881246 View in PubMed
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Acetyldinaline: a new oral cytostatic drug with impressive differential activity against leukemic cells and normal stem cells--preclinical studies in a relevant rat model for human acute myelocytic leukemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23997
Source
Cancer Res. 1993 Jul 1;53(13):3008-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-1993
Author
H M el-Beltagi
A C Martens
P. Lelieveld
E A Haroun
A. Hagenbeek
Author Affiliation
Department of Hemato-Oncology TNO, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
Source
Cancer Res. 1993 Jul 1;53(13):3008-14
Date
Jul-1-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Animals
Antineoplastic Agents - pharmacology
Bone Marrow - drug effects
Bone Marrow Cells
Cell Differentiation - drug effects
Cell Survival - drug effects
Clone Cells
Comparative Study
Disease Models, Animal
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Evaluation
Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor
Hematopoietic Stem Cells - cytology - drug effects
Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute - drug therapy - pathology
Male
Phenylenediamines - pharmacology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tumor Cells, Cultured
Abstract
Acetyldinaline [CI-994; GOE 5549; PD 123 654; 4-acetylamino-N-(2'-aminophenyl)-benzamide] is the acetylated derivative form of the original compound Dinaline (GOE 1734; PD 104 208). The efficacy and toxicity of Acetyldinaline for remission-induction treatment of leukemia were evaluated and compared with those observed in previous studies of Dinaline in the Brown Norway acute myelocytic leukemia, as a preclinical model for human acute myelocytic leukemia. There were three treatment groups. Leukemic animals received either 1 or 2 courses of 5 daily p.o. administrations of Acetyldinaline with a "full dose" of 23.7 mg/kg once daily (first group), a twice daily "half dose" of 11.85 mg/kg with an interval of 8 h (second group), or a "half dose" of 11.85 mg/kg once daily (third group). The drug-free interval between the 2 courses was 2 or 9 days. With repeated daily p.o. administrations of 23.7 mg/kg either in a single daily dose or a split daily dose of 2 x 11.85 mg/kg for 1 course, at least an 8-log leukemic cell kill was achieved. In contrast, with these treatment schedules, less than a 1-log cell kill of normal pluripotent hemopoietic stem cells (CFU-S) in the femoral bone marrow was found. Split daily dose treatment was more effective resulting in 37.5% cures, while no cures were observed with the single daily treatment for one course. Treatment with single daily dose of 23.7 mg/kg or a split daily dose of 2 x 11.85 mg/kg for 2 courses, with either a 2- or 9-day interval in between, resulted in lethal toxicity in most of rats. This result was comparable with that previously observed after equimolar doses of Dinaline (20 mg/kg). The half-dose once daily treatment with Acetyldinaline (11.85 mg/kg) for 1 or 2 cycles resulted in about a 4.5 or > 8-log leukemic cell kill, respectively. Toxic side effects, i.e., damage to the gastro-intestinal tract and hemorrhages in the lungs, were more pronounced with full dose either in the single or the split daily dose regimen. No significant toxicity was observed at the half-dose treatment once daily. In conclusion, the impressive differential activity against leukemic cells and normal stem cells observed in this relevant rat model for human acute myelocytic leukemia warrants the introduction of this compound in clinical phase I/II studies.
PubMed ID
8319208 View in PubMed
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[A comparative evaluation of the efficacy of peroral and intravenous pulse therapy with methylprednisolone in rheumatic diseases]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14180
Source
Lik Sprava. 1998 Oct-Nov;(7):48-52
Publication Type
Article
Author
K M Amosova
O B Iaremenko
O V Potapkov
N A Ivashchenko
Source
Lik Sprava. 1998 Oct-Nov;(7):48-52
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adult
Antirheumatic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Chi-Square Distribution
Chronic Disease
Comparative Study
Drug Evaluation
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Injections, Intravenous
Male
Methylprednisolone - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Rheumatic Diseases - blood - drug therapy
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Pulse therapy with methylprednisolone (Solu-Medrol, Upjohn), 1000 mg daily over three successive days, was administered to patients in two randomized groups of 14 patients in each (23 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, 5 with rheumatoid arthritis). In one of the groups the drug was taken per os, the other received it intravenously. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of clinical effectiveness and incidence of side effects However, the time-related course of such indices as erythrocyte sedimentation rate, the level of leukocytes, of total protein, urea, the blood antioxidant potential, permeability of erythrocytic membranes and capillary and tissue barrier proteinuria as well as the content of immune complexes in the arterial and venous blood was more striking with per os intake. Of the 14 patients, 11 demonstrated short-continued asymptomatic 35% rise in the activity of alaninaminotransferase.
PubMed ID
10050456 View in PubMed
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Acrylfentanyl: Another new psychoactive drug with fatal consequences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292003
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 2017 Aug; 277:e21-e29
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Davide Guerrieri
Emma Rapp
Markus Roman
Gunilla Thelander
Robert Kronstrand
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, 58758 Linköping, Sweden. Electronic address: davide.guerrieri@rmv.se.
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 2017 Aug; 277:e21-e29
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adolescent
Adult
Analgesics, Opioid - administration & dosage - blood - poisoning
Chromatography, Liquid
Drug Overdose
Female
Fentanyl - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood - poisoning
Forensic Toxicology
Humans
Male
Mass Spectrometry
Middle Aged
Nasal Sprays
Opioid-Related Disorders - blood - mortality
Street Drugs - blood - poisoning
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The European Nordic Countries are the most exposed to opioid-related deaths. Between April and October 2016, a series of forty lethal intoxications occurred in Sweden, in which the presence of the synthetic opioid acrylfentanyl was determined to be the main - or a contributing - cause of death. In the reported cases, the blood concentration of acrylfentanyl - mostly detected in combination with other drugs - ranged from 0.01ng/g to 5ng/g; victims were predominantly males (34 males and 6 females), and their age varied between 18 and 53 years. We further describe five cases, representative of the different drug administration route (nasal spray, tablets) and intentions (accidental or voluntary intoxication). Moreover, we address nine cases of non-lethal intoxication, in single (8 cases) or polydrug scenario (1 case). We discuss the present characteristics of the Swedish drug market for fentanyl-analogs in general and acrylfentanyl in particular, reporting a structural difficulty to effectively counteracting the appearance of unscheduled substances due to the constant turnover of new molecules on the recreational drug market.
PubMed ID
28587915 View in PubMed
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Acute intravenous and long-term oral hemodynamic effects of encainide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55611
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1986 Aug 29;58(5):25C-30C
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-29-1986
Author
M H Sami
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1986 Aug 29;58(5):25C-30C
Date
Aug-29-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adult
Aged
Anilides - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Anti-Arrhythmia Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Arrhythmia - drug therapy
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Encainide
Female
Heart Rate - drug effects
Heart Ventricles
Hemodynamic Processes - drug effects
Humans
Injections, Intravenous
Male
Middle Aged
Stroke Volume - drug effects
Time Factors
Abstract
The short- and long-term hemodynamic effects of encainide, a new class IC antiarrhythmic agent, were studied in 25 patients (mean age 61 +/- 11) with complex symptomatic ventricular arrhythmia and left ventricular dysfunction. Ninety-two percent had previous myocardial infarction and 8% had dilated cardiomyopathy. Seventy-five percent had congestive heart failure, class III or IV, according to the New York Heart Association. All patients underwent a nuclear ventriculogram performed at least 3 days after discontinuing previous antiarrhythmic drugs. Nuclear ventriculograms were repeated 1 to 6 weeks later while the patients were receiving therapeutic doses of encainide ranging from 75 to 300 [corrected] mg/day. Nuclear ventriculograms were also repeated after 6 months or 1 year of encainide therapy in 16 of these patients. Encainide did not have significant effects on heart rate, blood pressure, left ventricular ejection fraction, systolic or end-diastolic volumes. None of the patients showed a worsening of congestive heart failure during encainide therapy. These results compare favorably with those of other class I antiarrhythmic agents. A review of published reports on the hemodynamic effects of intravenous encainide shows it to have a mild but statistically significant dose-related depressant effect on cardiac function. This effect, however, appears to be no different from that of other newer class I agents.
Notes
Erratum In: Am J Cardiol 1988 Nov 15;62(16):1152
PubMed ID
3092616 View in PubMed
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Added predictive ability of the CHA2DS2VASc risk score for stroke and death in patients with atrial fibrillation: the prospective Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124928
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2012 May;5(3):335-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Torben Bjerregaard Larsen
Gregory Y H Lip
Flemming Skjøth
Karen Margrete Due
Kim Overvad
Lars Hvilsted Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Aalborg AF Study Group, Cardiovascular Research Centre, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. tobl@rn.dk
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2012 May;5(3):335-42
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Aged
Anticoagulants - administration & dosage
Atrial Fibrillation - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
ROC Curve
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Stroke - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Time Factors
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the added predictive ability of the CHA(2)DS(2)VASc prediction rule for stroke and death in a nonanticoagulated population of patients with atrial fibrillation.
We included 1603 nonanticoagulated patients with incident atrial fibrillation from a Danish prospective cohort study of 57 053 middle-aged men and women. The Net Reclassification Improvement was calculated as a measure to estimate any overall improvement in reclassification with the CHA(2)DS(2)VASc sore as an alternative to the CHADS(2) score. After 1-year follow-up, crude incidence rates were 3.4 per 100 person-years for stroke and 13.6 for death. After a mean follow-up of 5.4 years (± 3.7 years), the crude incidence rates for stroke and death were 1.9 and 5.6, respectively. During the entire observation period, the c-statistics and negative predictive values were similar for both risk scores. The Net Reclassification Improvement analysis showed that 1 of 10 reclassified atrial fibrillation patients would have been upgraded correctly using the CHA(2)DS(2)VASc score.
Both the CHADS(2) as well as the CHA(2)DS(2)VASc risk score can exclude a large proportion of patients from having high risk of stroke or death. However, using the CHA(2)DS(2)VASc risk score, fewer patients will fulfill the criterion for low risk (and are truly low risk for thromboembolism). For every 10 extra patients transferred to the treatment group at 5 years, using the CHA(2)DS(2)VASc risk score, 1 patient would have had a stroke that might have been avoided with effective treatment.
PubMed ID
22534406 View in PubMed
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Addition of sunitinib to cetuximab and irinotecan in patients with heavily pre-treated advanced colorectal cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142304
Source
Acta Oncol. 2010 Aug;49(6):833-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Camilla Qvortrup
Benny Vittrup Jensen
Trine Lembrecht Jorgensen
Dorte Nielsen
Jon Kroll Bjerregaard
Per Pfeiffer
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. Camilla.qvortrup@ouh.regionsyddanmark.dk
Source
Acta Oncol. 2010 Aug;49(6):833-6
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Monoclonal - administration & dosage
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Camptothecin - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Colorectal Neoplasms - drug therapy - pathology
Compassionate Use Trials
Denmark
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Humans
Indoles - administration & dosage
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Organoplatinum Compounds - administration & dosage
Pyrroles - administration & dosage
Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases - antagonists & inhibitors
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Results of continuous sunitinib, in combination with cetuximab and irinotecan every other week (SIC) for compassionate use in heavily pre-treated patients with mCRC are presented.
Patients with mCRC resistant to oxaliplatin, irinotecan, 5-FU and cetuximab received SIC at two Danish oncologic departments. The regimen consisted of sunitinib given as a continuous-dosing in combination with cetuximab and irinotecan every other week (CetIri). The first six patients started with a daily oral dose of sunitinib of 12.5 mg. Subsequent patients started at a daily dose of 25 mg with the possibility to escalate to 37.5 mg.
Twenty-nine patients received SIC. No patient had an objective response, but 13 patients had subjective relief and 42% had stable disease. The median time to progression was 3.2 months and median overall survival was 7.4 months. Fatigue and leukopenia were the most frequently reported severe adverse event (18% grade 3 and 18% grade 3/4, respectively).
Sunitinib continuous-dosing with 25 mg/day can safely be combined with CetIri administered every other week.
PubMed ID
20615171 View in PubMed
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Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1973 Feb 17;108(4):413 passim
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-17-1973
Author
D M McLean
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1973 Feb 17;108(4):413 passim
Date
Feb-17-1973
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoviridae Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Administration, Oral
Adult
Canada
Child, Preschool
Great Britain
Humans
Infant
Military Medicine
Pneumonia, Viral - epidemiology - prevention & control
Vaccination
Viral Vaccines - administration & dosage
Notes
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1962 Nov 24;87:1123-513944538
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1959 Oct 29;261:882-914423063
Cites: Br Med J. 1960 Jan 9;1(5166):91-313826535
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1963 Dec 21;89:1257-914098888
Cites: Adv Intern Med. 1967;13:127-425334719
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1961 Jun 8;264:1169-7513773790
Cites: Am J Hyg. 1958 May;67(3):367-7813533409
Cites: Am J Dis Child. 1967 Jul;114(1):36-414378107
Cites: Pediatrics. 1972 Nov;50(5):712-75084185
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1971 Aug;124(2):155-604330998
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1970 Oct 10;103(7):743-45506110
Cites: J Can Assoc Radiol. 1969 Dec;20(4):218-244312230
Cites: Br Med J. 1969 Jan 11;1(5636):73-94302627
PubMed ID
4347081 View in PubMed
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754 records – page 1 of 76.