Skip header and navigation

Refine By

36 records – page 1 of 4.

Adiposity, compared with masculinity, serves as a more valid cue to immunocompetence in human mate choice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118562
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2013 Jan 22;280(1751):20122495
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-22-2013
Author
Markus J Rantala
Vinet Coetzee
Fhionna R Moore
Ilona Skrinda
Sanita Kecko
Tatjana Krama
Inese Kivleniece
Indrikis Krams
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, Section of Ecology, University of Turku, 20014 Turku, Finland.
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2013 Jan 22;280(1751):20122495
Date
Jan-22-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue
Adiposity - genetics
Adult
Body Weights and Measures
Choice Behavior
Cues
European Continental Ancestry Group
Face
Female
Finland
Hepatitis B Antibodies - blood
Humans
Immunocompetence - genetics
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Latvia
Male
Masculinity
Regression Analysis
Sexual Behavior - physiology
Testosterone - blood
Abstract
According to the 'good genes' hypothesis, females choose males based on traits that indicate the male's genetic quality in terms of disease resistance. The 'immunocompetence handicap hypothesis' proposed that secondary sexual traits serve as indicators of male genetic quality, because they indicate that males can contend with the immunosuppressive effects of testosterone. Masculinity is commonly assumed to serve as such a secondary sexual trait. Yet, women do not consistently prefer masculine looking men, nor is masculinity consistently related to health across studies. Here, we show that adiposity, but not masculinity, significantly mediates the relationship between a direct measure of immune response (hepatitis B antibody response) and attractiveness for both body and facial measurements. In addition, we show that circulating testosterone is more closely associated with adiposity than masculinity. These findings indicate that adiposity, compared with masculinity, serves as a more important cue to immunocompetence in female mate choice.
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 1999 Oct 27;282(16):1523-910546691
Cites: Nature. 1998 Aug 27;394(6696):884-79732869
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1993 Oct 1;119(7 Pt 2):655-608363192
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 1998 May 22;265(1399):927-339633114
Cites: Br J Psychol. 2000 Feb;91 ( Pt 1):125-4010717775
Cites: Nat Commun. 2012;3:69422353724
Cites: PLoS One. 2010;5(10):e1358521048972
Cites: Perception. 2009;38(11):1700-1120120267
Cites: Demography. 2009 Feb;46(1):27-4119348107
Cites: Evolution. 2008 Oct;62(10):2473-8618691260
Cites: Behav Res Methods. 2008 Aug;40(3):879-9118697684
Cites: Circulation. 2007 Oct 23;116(17):1942-5117965405
Cites: Horm Behav. 2007 May;51(5):633-917466990
Cites: J Nutr. 2006 May;136(5):1141-416614394
Cites: Annu Rev Psychol. 2006;57:199-22616318594
Cites: Psychol Bull. 2005 Sep;131(5):635-5316187849
Cites: Hum Reprod. 1999 Jul;14(7):1835-910402400
Cites: Nature. 1999 Jun 24;399(6738):741-210391238
Cites: Lancet. 1999 May 1;353(9163):150010232328
Cites: Science. 1982 Oct 22;218(4570):384-77123238
Cites: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2004 Jan;28(1):39-4814610529
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2003 Aug 7;270 Suppl 1:S93-512952647
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Jan 1;289(1):76-912503980
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2000 Sep;72(3):694-70110966886
PubMed ID
23193134 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adiposity in 277 young adult male offspring of women with diabetes compared with controls: a Danish population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125402
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Jul;91(7):838-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Gunnar Lauge Nielsen
Claus Dethlefsen
Søren Lundbye-Christensen
Jan Fog Pedersen
Lars Mølsted-Pedersen
Matt W Gillman
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Himmerland Hospital, Farsø, Denmark. guln@rn.dk
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Jul;91(7):838-43
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Confidence Intervals
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes, Gestational - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Insulin - therapeutic use
Male
Military Personnel
Personnel Selection
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Diabetics - drug therapy - epidemiology
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine the associations of maternal diabetes, overall and stratified according to treatment of diabetes, with weight-related outcomes at the time of military conscription, at age 18-20 years.
Cohort study of 277 Danish male offspring of mothers with recognized pre-gestational or gestational diabetes. As population-based controls we selected 870 men matched from the Civil Registration Office.
Data on weight-related outcomes were retrieved from the Danish military conscription registry.
Military rejection due to adiposity and body mass index (BMI) at conscription.
Army rejection rate due to adiposity was 5.8% (n= 16) among 277 diabetes mellitus-exposed men compared with 3.1% (n= 27) in 870 controls (risk difference 2.7 (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.3-5.7)) and mean BMI at conscription was 1.4 kg/m(2) (95%CI 0.8-2.0) higher among those diabetes mellitus-exposed men. In analyses adjusted for birthweight and gestational age, compared with controls, the BMI was 0.6 kg/m(2) (95%CI -0.3-1.5) higher in sons of mothers with pre-gestational and 2.7 kg/m(2) (95% (CI): 0.9-4.5) higher with gestational diabetes. The greatest BMI difference was in offspring of mothers with gestational diabetes in whom insulin was initiated during pregnancy. We found no difference in conscript height.
Compared with controls, male offspring of women with diabetes had a higher rejection rate due to adiposity and higher adult BMI. Subgroup analyses showed that the association was most pronounced in sons of mothers with gestational diabetes, whereas pre-gestational diabetes was only weakly associated with higher offspring BMI.
PubMed ID
22486385 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of 30 genes (355 SNPS) related to energy homeostasis for association with adiposity in European-American and Yup'ik Eskimo populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153695
Source
Hum Hered. 2009;67(3):193-205
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Wendy K Chung
Amit Patki
Naoki Matsuoka
Bert B Boyer
Nianjun Liu
Solomon K Musani
Anna V Goropashnaya
Perciliz L Tan
Nicholas Katsanis
Stephen B Johnson
Peter K Gregersen
David B Allison
Rudolph L Leibel
Hemant K Tiwari
Author Affiliation
Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA. wkc15@columbia.edu
Source
Hum Hered. 2009;67(3):193-205
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - genetics
Adult
Alaska
Body Composition - genetics
Body mass index
Epistasis, Genetic
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Ghrelin - genetics
Haplotypes
Humans
Inuits - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
New York City
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Skinfold thickness
Waist Circumference - genetics
Abstract
Human adiposity is highly heritable, but few of the genes that predispose to obesity in most humans are known. We tested candidate genes in pathways related to food intake and energy expenditure for association with measures of adiposity.
We studied 355 genetic variants in 30 candidate genes in 7 molecular pathways related to obesity in two groups of adult subjects: 1,982 unrelated European Americans living in the New York metropolitan area drawn from the extremes of their body mass index (BMI) distribution and 593 related Yup'ik Eskimos living in rural Alaska characterized for BMI, body composition, waist circumference, and skin fold thicknesses. Data were analyzed by using a mixed model in conjunction with a false discovery rate (FDR) procedure to correct for multiple testing.
After correcting for multiple testing, two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Ghrelin (GHRL) (rs35682 and rs35683) were associated with BMI in the New York European Americans. This association was not replicated in the Yup'ik participants. There was no evidence for gene x gene interactions among genes within the same molecular pathway after adjusting for multiple testing via FDR control procedure.
Genetic variation in GHRL may have a modest impact on BMI in European Americans.
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Jun;64(3):281-9016050322
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1999 Oct 7;341(15):1097-10510511607
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2005 Dec;90(12):6672-716204371
Cites: J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab. 2005 Nov;18(11):1083-616459454
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006 Apr;14(4):529-64416741264
Cites: Diabet Med. 2006 Jun;23(6):685-916759313
Cites: Metabolism. 2006 Oct;55(10):1420-516979415
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2006 Nov;30(11):1609-1416865101
Cites: Annu Rev Genomics Hum Genet. 2006;7:125-4816722803
Cites: Hum Mutat. 2007 Mar;28(3):294-30217072869
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Jul;86(1):25-3217616759
Cites: Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2002 Jun;26(4):393-42812204189
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Oct 9;288(14):1723-712365955
Cites: Neuron. 2002 Oct 10;36(2):199-21112383777
Cites: Hum Hered. 2003;55(1):56-6512890927
Cites: Biometrics. 2003 Jun;59(2):420-912926727
Cites: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2004 Mar;28(3):447-5014724664
Cites: J Urban Health. 2004 Jun;81(2):301-1015136663
Cites: JAMA. 2004 Jun 16;291(23):2847-5015199035
Cites: Trends Mol Med. 2001 May;7(5):205-1311325632
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 2002 Feb;70(2):425-3411791212
Cites: Genet Med. 2002 Mar-Apr;4(2):45-6111882781
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2002 Jun;87(6):271612050239
Cites: Biotechniques. 2002 Jun;Suppl:56-8, 60-112083399
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 2004 Oct;75(4):561-7015290652
Cites: Eur J Endocrinol. 2004 Jul;151(1):127-3315248833
Cites: Obes Res. 2002 Aug;10(8):782-9112181387
Cites: JAMA. 1986 Jul 4;256(1):51-43712713
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1990 May 24;322(21):1483-72336075
Cites: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1996 Nov;20(11):990-98923155
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 1998 Oct;63(4):1190-2019758596
Cites: Endocr Rev. 1999 Feb;20(1):68-10010047974
Cites: Trends Endocrinol Metab. 2005 Aug;16(6):267-7216005242
PubMed ID
19077438 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of the LINGO2-related SNP rs10968576 with body mass in a cohort of elderly Swedes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267388
Source
Mol Genet Genomics. 2015 Aug;290(4):1485-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Mathias Rask-Andersen
Markus Sällman Almén
Lars Lind
Helgi B Schiöth
Source
Mol Genet Genomics. 2015 Aug;290(4):1485-91
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - genetics
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Female
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Humans
Introns - genetics
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified common genetic factors influencing body mass as well as body adiposity. The functional implications of these loci are currently under investigation. Intense scrutiny of the body mass-associated FTO locus revealed age-specific effects, or a weakened effect in elderly populations. In this study, we aimed to determine the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) representing 35 GWAS-identified body mass- and adiposity-associated genetic loci. In our analysis, 949 participants of the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors cohort were included. All participants were born between 1920 and 1924. Data were available for 474 male and 475 female participants at age 70 and 380 male and 390 female participants at age 75. Genetic associations with BMI and change in BMI from age 70 to 75 were analyzed. In our analysis, rs10968576, an intronic SNP within the LINGO2 (LERN3, LRRN6C) gene, was associated with body mass in a cross section of elderly Swedes at age 70. This is the first study to replicate the association of a LINGO2-related genetic variant with body mass in an independent cohort of elderly citizens.
PubMed ID
25711307 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between sports participation, cardiorespiratory fitness, and adiposity in young adult twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138202
Source
J Appl Physiol (1985). 2011 Mar;110(3):681-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
L. Mustelin
A. Latvala
K H Pietiläinen
P. Piirilä
A R Sovijärvi
U M Kujala
A. Rissanen
J. Kaprio
Author Affiliation
Hjelt Institute, Dept. of Public Health, Twin Research Unit, PB 41, 00014 Univ. of Helsinki, Finland. linda.mustelin@helsinki.fi
Source
J Appl Physiol (1985). 2011 Mar;110(3):681-6
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - genetics
Adult
Body Size - genetics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic Association Studies
Heart
Humans
Motor Activity - genetics
Physical Fitness - physiology
Sports
Statistics as Topic
Twins - genetics - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Exercise behavior, cardiorespiratory fitness, and obesity are strongly influenced by genetic factors. By studying young adult twins, we examined to what extent these interrelated traits have shared genetic and environmental etiologies. We studied 304 twin individuals selected from the population-based FinnTwin16 study. Physical activity was assessed with the Baecke questionnaire, yielding three indexes: sport index, leisure-time index, and work index. In this study, we focused on sport index, which describes sports participation. Body composition was determined using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and cardiorespiratory fitness using a bicycle ergometer exercise test with gas exchange analysis. The Baecke sport index was associated with high maximal oxygen uptake adjusted for lean body mass (Vo(2max)[adj]) (r = 0.40), with low body fat percentage (BF%) (r = -0.44) and low waist circumference (WC) (r = -0.29). Heritability estimates for the key traits were as follows: 56% for sport index, 71% for Vo(2max)[adj], 77% for body mass index, 66% for WC, and 68% for BF%. The association between sport index and Vo(2max) was mostly explained by genetic factors (70%), as were both the association between sport index and BF% (71%) and that between sport index and WC (59%). Our results suggest that genetic factors explain a considerable part of the associations between sports participation, cardiorespiratory fitness, and obesity.
PubMed ID
21193564 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association study of common variants in the sFRP1 gene region and parameters of bone strength and body composition in two independent healthy Caucasian male cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128687
Source
Mol Genet Metab. 2012 Mar;105(3):508-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Eveline Boudin
Elke Piters
Erik Fransen
Torben Leo Nielsen
Marianne Andersen
Greet Roef
Youri Taes
Kim Brixen
Wim Van Hul
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Belgium. eveline.boudin@ua.ac.be
Source
Mol Genet Metab. 2012 Mar;105(3):508-15
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - genetics
Adult
Aged
Belgium
Body Composition - genetics
Body mass index
Bone Density - genetics
Bone and Bones - physiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Humans
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins - genetics
Male
Membrane Proteins - genetics
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Young Adult
Abstract
Bone mineral density (BMD) and bone strength are predictive parameters for the development of osteoporosis and related fracture later in life. Although it is well known that BMD and bone strength have a high heritability, not much of the variation is already explained. Mice models showed that sFRP1 has an influence on bone formation. Therefore this study aimed to investigate the effect of common genetic variation on BMD and bone strength in Caucasian men of different ages. Using HapMap we selected 13 tagSNPs which tag most common genetic variation in and around sFRP1 and we genotyped these SNPs in the young cohort of the Odense Androgen Study (OAS). The OAS includes a total of 1383 Danish men from two different age groups ([20-29 years]: N=783; [60-74 years]: N=600) and is well characterised. The subjects were phenotyped for BMD at several sites, and additionally for body composition and hip geometry parameters. Based on the results of the young cohort we selected three SNPs for further analysis in the complete OAS population. To conclude we tried to replicate the results of two SNPs in an independent population of 994 Belgian men. We found a strong association for rs9694405 with BMI as well in both cohorts separately as in the whole OAS population. Further we found rs4736965 associated with several hip geometry parameters in the same population. However we were not able to replicate those results in the Belgian population. At last we found in the OAS population age specific effects for rs10106678 with whole body BMD and waist to hip ratio.
PubMed ID
22178351 View in PubMed
Less detail

Body fat and mobility are explained by common genetic and environmental influences in older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157662
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Jul;16(7):1616-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Alfredo Ortega-Alonso
Sarianna Sipilä
Urho M Kujala
Jaakko Kaprio
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. alfredo.ortega@sport.jyu.fi
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Jul;16(7):1616-21
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adiposity - genetics
Age Factors
Aged
Aging - genetics
Electric Impedance
Environment
Female
Finland
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Locomotion - genetics
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Models, Genetic
Obesity - genetics - physiopathology
Physical Endurance - genetics
Risk factors
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics
Walking
Abstract
In older adults, mobility limitations often coexist with overweight or obesity, suggesting that similar factors may underlie both traits. This study examined the extent to which genetic and environmental influences explain the association between adiposity and mobility in older women. Body fat percentage (bioimpedance test), walking speed over 10 m, and distance walked in a 6-min test were evaluated in 92 monozygotic (MZ) and 104 dizygotic (DZ) pairs of twin sisters reared together, aged 63-76 years. Genetic and environmental influences on each trait were estimated using age-adjusted multivariate genetic modeling. The analyses showed that the means (and s.d.) for body fat percentage, walking speed, and walking endurance were 33.2+/-7.3%, 1.7+/-0.3 m/s and 529.7+/-75.4 m, respectively. The phenotypic correlation between adiposity and walking speed was -0.32 and between adiposity and endurance it was -0.33. Genetic influences explained 80% of the association between adiposity and speed, and 65% of adiposity and walking endurance. Cross-trait genetic influences accounted for 12% of the variability in adiposity, 56% in walking speed, and 34% in endurance. Trait-specific genetic influences were also detected for adiposity (54%) and walking endurance (13%), but not speed. In conclusion, among community-living older women, an inverse association was found between adiposity and mobility that was mostly due to the effect of shared genes. This result suggests that the identification of genetic variants for body fat metabolism may also provide understanding of the development of mobility limitations in older women.
PubMed ID
18421266 View in PubMed
Less detail

Candidate gene association study of BMI-related loci, weight, and adiposity in old age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118879
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2013 Jun;68(6):661-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Rachel A Murphy
Michael A Nalls
Margaux Keller
Melissa Garcia
Stephen B Kritchevsky
Frances A Tylavsky
Anne B Newman
Gregory J Tranah
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Vilmundur Gudnason
Tamara B Harris
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Epidemiology, Demography, and Biometry, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Aging, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. Rachel.murphy@nih.gov
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2013 Jun;68(6):661-6
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - genetics
African Americans - ethnology - genetics
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Body mass index
Body Weight
European Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology - genetics
Female
Gene Expression Regulation
Genetic Loci
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Testing
Genome, Human
Humans
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - genetics
Overweight - genetics
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Prospective Studies
Sampling Studies
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Most genome-wide association studies are confined to middle-aged populations. It is unclear whether associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and obesity persist in old age. We aimed to relate 10 body mass index (BMI)-associated SNPs to weight, BMI, % fat, visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue in Health ABC and AGES-Reykjavik comprising 4,846 individuals of European Ancestry, and 1,139 African Americans over age 65. SNPs were scaled using effect estimates from candidate SNPs. In Health ABC, a SNP near GNPDA2 was modestly associated with weight and SAT area (p = .008, p = .001). Risk score (sum of scaled SNPs) was associated with weight, BMI, and SAT area (p
Notes
Cites: Nat Genet. 2010 Nov;42(11):949-6020935629
Cites: Lancet. 2010 Oct 23;376(9750):1393-40020971364
Cites: PLoS Genet. 2011;7(2):e100130021347282
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2011 Nov;19(11):2241-721818152
Cites: PLoS Genet. 2012;8(3):e100249122423221
Cites: PLoS Genet. 2012;8(5):e100269522589738
Cites: Transl Psychiatry. 2012;2:e11922832964
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000 Jun;54 Suppl 3:S48-5311041075
Cites: Aging Clin Exp Res. 2003 Aug;15(4):321-714661824
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1997 Jul;66(1):111-59209177
Cites: Behav Genet. 1997 Jul;27(4):325-519519560
Cites: J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2005 Mar;60(3):324-3315860469
Cites: Diabetes. 2006 Feb;55(2):385-916443771
Cites: Nat Genet. 2006 Aug;38(8):904-916862161
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2007 May 1;165(9):1076-8717351290
Cites: PLoS One. 2008;3(3):e174618335027
Cites: PLoS Genet. 2007 Jul;3(7):e11517658951
Cites: Diabetes. 2008 Nov;57(11):3145-5118647953
Cites: Nat Genet. 2009 Jan;41(1):18-2419079260
Cites: Hum Mol Genet. 2009 Jul 15;18(14):2700-1019414484
Cites: Hum Mol Genet. 2009 Sep 15;18(18):3496-50119528091
Cites: Circ Cardiovasc Genet. 2009 Feb;2(1):73-8020031568
Cites: Nat Genet. 2010 Nov;42(11):937-4820935630
PubMed ID
23160366 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Adiposity as Determinants of Metabolic Health-Pooled Analysis of Two Twin Cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285680
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2017 May 01;102(5):1520-1528
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-01-2017
Author
Sakari Jukarainen
René Holst
Christine Dalgård
Päivi Piirilä
Jesper Lundbom
Antti Hakkarainen
Nina Lundbom
Aila Rissanen
Jaakko Kaprio
Kirsten Ohm Kyvik
Thorkild I A Sørensen
Kirsi H Pietiläinen
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2017 May 01;102(5):1520-1528
Date
May-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - genetics - physiology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Body Composition - genetics - physiology
Cardiorespiratory Fitness - physiology
Cholesterol, HDL - metabolism
Cholesterol, LDL - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Electric Impedance
Female
Finland
Gene-Environment Interaction
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Insulin Resistance - genetics - physiology
Intra-Abdominal Fat - diagnostic imaging
Linear Models
Liver - diagnostic imaging
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - genetics - metabolism
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Oxygen Consumption - genetics - physiology
Triglycerides - metabolism
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Young Adult
Abstract
The joint effects of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and body composition on metabolic health are not well known.
To examine the associations of CRF, fat-free mass index (FFMI), and fat mass index (FMI) with metabolic health in individual twins and controlling for genetic and shared environmental effects by studying monozygotic intrapair differences.
Two cross-sectional samples of healthy adult monozygotic and dizygotic twins were drawn from population-based Danish and Finnish national twin registries (n = 996 and n = 309).
CRF was defined as VO2max divided by fat-free mass. Insulin sensitivity and acute insulin response indices were derived from an oral glucose tolerance test. A continuous metabolic syndrome score was calculated. Visceral and liver fat were measured in the Finnish sample. Associations were analyzed separately in both cohorts with multivariate linear regression and aggregated with meta-analytic methods.
Insulin sensitivity, acute insulin response, metabolic syndrome score, visceral, and liver fat amount had strong and statistically significant associations with FMI (
?
0.53 to 0.79), whereas their associations with CRF and FFMI were at most weak (
0.02 to 0.15). The results of the monozygotic intrapair differences analysis showed the same pattern.
Although FMI is strongly associated with worsening of metabolic health traits, even after controlling for genetic and shared environmental factors, there was little evidence for the effects of CRF or FFMI on metabolic health. This suggests that changing FMI rather than CRF or FFMI may affect metabolic health irrespective of genetic or early environmental determinants.
PubMed ID
28324016 View in PubMed
Less detail

A common variant of the FTO gene is associated with not only increased adiposity but also elevated blood pressure in French Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146523
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Genet. 2009 Jun;2(3):260-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Zdenka Pausova
Catriona Syme
Michal Abrahamowicz
Yongling Xiao
Gabriel T Leonard
Michel Perron
Louis Richer
Suzanne Veillette
George Davey Smith
Ondrej Seda
Johanne Tremblay
Pavel Hamet
Daniel Gaudet
Tomas Paus
Author Affiliation
Brain and Body Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom. zdenka.pausova@nottingham.ac.uk
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Genet. 2009 Jun;2(3):260-9
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - physiology
Adiposity - genetics
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Blood Pressure - genetics
Canada
Child
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Founder Effect
France - ethnology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Glucose - metabolism
Humans
Hypertension - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - genetics
Phenotype
Proteins - genetics
Vasomotor System - physiology
Abstract
FTO is the first gene established as contributing to common forms of obesity. The gene is highly expressed in the hypothalamus and is thought to mediate this effect through its influence on energy homeostasis. The hypothalamus, however, also regulates blood pressure (BP). Therefore, we investigated whether the FTO-risk variant is associated not only with increased adiposity but also with elevated BP and whether the latter may be mediated, in part, by increased sympathetic modulation of vasomotor tone.
The primary study was carried out in 485 adolescents recruited from a French Canadian founder population who underwent detailed body-composition and cardiovascular phenotyping. Body fat was examined with MRI, bioimpedance, and anthropometry. BP was recorded beat to beat at rest and during physical and mental challenges. Sympathetic modulation of vasomotor tone was assessed with power spectral analysis of BP. We found that individuals with the FTO-risk genotype compared with those without it demonstrate greater adiposity, including the amount of intra-abdominal fat (by 38%). They also showed higher systolic BP throughout the entire protocol, with a maximum difference during a mental stress (6.4 [1.5 to 11.3] mm Hg). The difference in BP was accompanied by elevated index of sympathetic modulation of vasomotor tone. A replication in an independent sample of adults from the same founder population confirmed the association between FTO and BP.
These results suggest that, in a French Canadian founder population, FTO may increase not only risk for obesity, as demonstrated in other populations, but also for hypertension. The latter may be related, at least in part, to the regulation of sympathetic vasomotor tone.
PubMed ID
20031594 View in PubMed
Less detail

36 records – page 1 of 4.