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Adenocarcinoma of the Oesophagus and Oesophagogastric Junction: Analysis of Incidence and Risk Factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279760
Source
Anticancer Res. 2016 May;36(5):2323-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Tuomo Rantanen
Niku Oksala
Juhani Sand
Source
Anticancer Res. 2016 May;36(5):2323-9
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Barrett Esophagus - epidemiology
Cholecystectomy - statistics & numerical data
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Esophagogastric Junction - pathology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Fundoplication - statistics & numerical data
Gastroesophageal Reflux - epidemiology - surgery
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity - trends
Neoplasm Staging
Neoplasms, Second Primary - epidemiology
Precancerous Conditions - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Conflicting data exist on the changes in the incidence of oesophageal (EAC) and oesophagogastric junction adenocarcinoma (EGJAC). In addition, risk factors of the disease are only partly known. The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of EAC and EGJAC in Finland as well as risk factors of these cancers.
The complete number of new EAC and EGJAC cases between January 1980 and December 2007 in Finland was provided by the Finnish Cancer Registry. All treated EAC and EGJAC patients in the Pirkanmaa Hospital District between January 1980 and December 2007 were included in the study.
The incidence of EAC increased significantly in Finland. Barrett's oesophagus (BE) was associated with the risk of EAC and cholecystectomy with the risk of EGJAC.
A significant increase in EAC was found in Finland over the course of nearly 30 years, indicating that the increase in EAC in Finland is existent in the long term. BE was associated with the risk of EAC and cholecystectomy with the risk of EGJAC.
PubMed ID
27127139 View in PubMed
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Adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix: the presence of human papillomavirus and the method of detection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18218
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2003 Oct;82(10):960-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Sonia Andersson
Barbro Larson
Anders Hjerpe
Claes Silfverswärd
Jan Sällström
Erik Wilander
Eva Rylander
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Science, Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Huddinge University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. sonia.andersson@telia.com
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2003 Oct;82(10):960-5
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology - virology
Adult
Age Factors
Contraceptives, Oral
DNA, Viral - analysis
Female
Humans
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Metastasis
Papillomavirus, Human - isolation & purification
Papovaviridae Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Single-Stranded Conformational
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Smoking
Sweden - epidemiology
Tumor Virus Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - virology
Vaginal Smears - standards
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Effective screening programs have contributed to a decrease in the incidence of cervical squamous cell carcinomas but have had a limited sensitivity in the detection of adenocarcinoma precursor lesions. The aim of our study was to analyze cervical adenocarcinoma in greater detail: symptoms preceding the detection, the method of detection and the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) with respect to age at diagnosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Clinical data were abstracted from the medical records of 82 women with pure invasive cervical adenocarcinomas. As diagnostic tools we used polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and/or direct DNA sequencing for HPV detection. RESULTS: Age at diagnosis predicting factors were HPV status, positive lymph nodes, histology and stage. HPV-negativity, lymph node metastases, advanced stage and poor differentiation were all associated with a high diagnostic age. In the multivariate analysis only HPV status was shown to have an independent impact on age at diagnosis, while stage showed only borderline significance. Twenty-three percent of the cancers were detected by screening and the remaining were due to different symptoms. Among the women considered, 93% had a normal Papanicolaou (Pap) smear 3 years before diagnosis and 60% within 1 year. There was no significant correlation between smoking, oral contraceptives and HPV-positivity. CONCLUSIONS: The absence of HPV was significantly associated with a high age at diagnosis. Pap screening had a limited effect in detecting adenocarcinoma at an early stage.
PubMed ID
12956848 View in PubMed
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Airborne occupational exposures and risk of oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16521
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2006 Feb;63(2):107-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
C. Jansson
N. Plato
A L V Johansson
O. Nyrén
J. Lagergren
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Catarina.Jansson@meb.ki.se
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2006 Feb;63(2):107-12
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - toxicity
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - etiology
Cardia
Epidemiologic Methods
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Industry
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Occupations
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The reasons for the increasing incidence of and strong male predominance in patients with oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma remain unclear. The authors hypothesised that airborne occupational exposures in male dominated industries might contribute. METHODS: In a nationwide Swedish population based case control study, 189 and 262 cases of oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma respectively, 167 cases of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and 820 frequency matched controls underwent personal interviews. Based on each study participant's lifetime occupational history the authors assessed cumulative airborne occupational exposure for 10 agents, analysed individually and combined, by a deterministic additive model including probability, frequency, and intensity. Furthermore, occupations and industries of longest duration were analysed. Relative risks were estimated by odds ratios (OR), with 95% confidence intervals (CI), using conditional logistic regression, adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: Tendencies of positive associations were found between high exposure to pesticides and risk of oesophageal (OR 2.3 (95% CI 0.9 to 5.7)) and cardia adenocarcinoma (OR 2.1 (95% CI 1.0 to 4.6)). Among workers highly exposed to particular agents, a tendency of an increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma was found. There was a twofold increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma among concrete and construction workers (OR 2.2 (95% CI 1.1 to 4.2)) and a nearly fourfold increased risk of cardia adenocarcinoma among workers within the motor vehicle industry (OR 3.9 (95% CI 1.5 to 10.4)). An increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OR 3.9 (95% CI 1.2 to 12.5)), and a tendency of an increased risk of cardia adenocarcinoma (OR 2.8 (95% CI 0.9 to 8.5)), were identified among hotel and restaurant workers. CONCLUSIONS: Specific airborne occupational exposures do not seem to be of major importance in the aetiology of oesophageal or cardia adenocarcinoma and are unlikely to contribute to the increasing incidence or the male predominance.
PubMed ID
16421388 View in PubMed
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[Alarming increase of esophageal cancer. Is antireflux surgery an efficient prevention?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20012
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Dec 20;97(51-52):6016-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-20-2000

Alcohol consumption, smoking and risk of gastric cancer: case-control study from Moscow, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198346
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2000 Apr;11(4):363-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
D. Zaridze
E. Borisova
D. Maximovitch
V. Chkhikvadze
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Institute of Carcinogenesis, Russian Cancer Research Center, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2000 Apr;11(4):363-71
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
Age Distribution
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Adenosquamous - epidemiology - etiology
Carcinoma, Signet Ring Cell - epidemiology - etiology
Cardia
Case-Control Studies
Female
Helicobacter Infections - epidemiology
Helicobacter pylori
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Moscow - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
To examine the risk of gastric cancer associated with alcohol consumption and smoking in men and women in Moscow, Russia.
A case-control study which includes 448 cases and 610 controls was conducted. Cases consisted of patients with newly diagnosed histologically confirmed gastric cancer. Controls were patients admitted during the study period to the hospital with diagnoses other than cancer and/or gastrointestinal diseases. Information on demographic variables, smoking, alcohol consumption and diet was collected from all subjects. Venous blood was drawn from 361 cases and 441 controls. A serological test for Helicobacter pylori immunoglobulin G was performed.
Alcohol consumption, particularly vodka consumption, was found to increase the risk of gastric cancer. In men the effect of hard liquor drinking was stronger for cancer of the cardia (OR = 3.4, CI = 1.2-10.2), while in women the effect was stronger for cancer of sites other than gastric cardia (OR = 1.5, CI = 1.0-2.3). Smoking increased the risk of developing gastric cancer in men, but not in women. In men a dose-response relationship between mean number of cigarettes smoked per day (p = 0.03), pack-years of cigarettes smoked (p = 0.01) and duration of smoking (p = 0.08) and the risk of cancer of gastric cardia was observed. Further statistical analysis revealed interactions between effect of smoking and alcohol consumption and between smoking and H. pylori infection status.
The findings further support the role of alcohol consumption and smoking in the etiology of gastric cancer.
PubMed ID
10843447 View in PubMed
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Anal and rectal cancer in Crohn's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18251
Source
Colorectal Dis. 2003 Sep;5(5):490-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
R I Sjödahl
P. Myrelid
J D Söderholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University Hospital, SE-581 85 Linköping, Sweden. rune.sjodahl@lio.se
Source
Colorectal Dis. 2003 Sep;5(5):490-5
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology - pathology - therapy
Anus Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - pathology - therapy
Crohn Disease - complications
Humans
Incidence
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - pathology - therapy
Risk factors
Abstract
Several epidemiological studies have been published regarding the risk of Crohn's disease- associated colorectal cancer. The findings are, however, contradictory and it has been particularly difficult to obtain indisputable information on the incidence of cancer limited to the rectum and the anus. During 1987-2000 rectal or anal cancer was diagnosed in 335 patients in Sweden (153 males, 182 females). In other words, approximately 3 Crohn patients per million inhabitants were diagnosed with rectal or anal cancer every year during that time period which is 1% of the total number of cases. At diagnosis of cancer 36% were aged below 50 years and 58% below 60 years. Corresponding figures for all cases of anal and rectal cancer were 5% and 18%, respectively. Present knowledge from the literature implies that there is an increased risk of rectal and anal cancer only in Crohn's disease patients with severe proctitis or severe chronic perianal disease. However, the rectal remnant must also be considered a risk factor. Multimodal treatment is similar to that in sporadic cancer but proctectomy and total or partial colectomy is added depending on the extent of the Crohn's disease. The outcome is the same as in sporadic cancer at a corresponding stage but the prognosis is often poor due to the advanced stage of cancer at diagnosis. We suggest that six high-risk groups should be recommended annual surveillance after a duration of Crohn's disease of 15 years including extensive colitis, chronic severe anorectal disease, rectal remnant, strictures, bypassed segments and sclerosing cholangitis.
PubMed ID
12925087 View in PubMed
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Anthropometric measures and breast cancer in young women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25138
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1990 Sep;1(2):169-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1990
Author
E. Lund
H O Adami
R. Bergstrøm
O. Meirik
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1990 Sep;1(2):169-72
Date
Sep-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
Adult
Body Height
Body mass index
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Maternal Age
Norway - epidemiology
Parity
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Body height and weight in relation to breast cancer in women younger than 45 years were investigated in a case-control study in Sweden and Norway. The study included 317 Swedish and 105 Norwegian cases diagnosed in 1984-85 with 317 Swedish and 210 Norwegian age-matched population controls. Neither height nor body size, measured as body mass index, was associated with breast cancer. Change in body mass from the age of 20 years to 18 months before the time of diagnosis (cases) or interview (controls) had no effect on breast cancer risk. The study provides no evidence that anthropometric measures are risk factors for breast cancer in young women, indicating that the postulated inverse relationship between body mass index and pre-menopausal breast cancer could be limited to peri-menopausal women.
PubMed ID
2102287 View in PubMed
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Are female smokers at higher risk for lung cancer than male smokers? A case-control analysis by histologic type.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220337
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1993 Sep 1;138(5):281-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1993
Author
H A Risch
G R Howe
M. Jain
J D Burch
E J Holowaty
A B Miller
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1993 Sep 1;138(5):281-93
Date
Sep-1-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Carcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
Carcinoma, Small Cell - epidemiology - etiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Time Factors
Abstract
A case-control study of male-female differences in cigarette smoking and lung cancer was conducted during 1981-1985 in Toronto, St. Catharine's, and Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada. In total, 442 female and 403 male histologically verified cancer cases were individually matched by age and area of residence to each other and to 410 female and 362 male randomly selected population controls. Subjects were interviewed concerning their exposures to various life-style factors, and in particular, they received detailed questioning regarding their lifelong histories of usage of tobacco products. It was found that, for both sexes, a greatly elevated risk of developing lung cancer was associated with cigarette consumption, increasing with pack-years of cigarettes smoked and declining with duration of time since quitting smoking. Furthermore, the association was significantly (p = 0.010) and appreciably stronger for females than for males. At a history of 40 pack-years relative to lifelong nonsmoking, the odds ratio for women was 27.9 (95% confidence interval (CI) 14.9-52.0) and that for men was 9.60 (95% CI 5.64-16.3). Higher odds ratios for females were also seen within each of the major histologic groupings. Thus, the higher elevated risk of lung cancer currently observed in other studies for female ever smokers compared with male ever smokers, while possibly attributable in part to greater smoking cessation among males, may be due to higher susceptibility among females.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Epidemiol. 1994 Jul 15;140(2):185-6; author reply 187-88023806
Comment In: Am J Epidemiol. 1994 Jul 15;140(2):186-7; author reply 187-88023808
PubMed ID
8395141 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among firefighters: 45 years of follow-up in five Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105024
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2014 Jun;71(6):398-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Eero Pukkala
Jan Ivar Martinsen
Elisabete Weiderpass
Kristina Kjaerheim
Elsebeth Lynge
Laufey Tryggvadottir
Pär Sparén
Paul A Demers
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Institute for Statistical and Epidemiological Cancer Research, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2014 Jun;71(6):398-404
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Carcinogens
Cohort Studies
Firefighters
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Multiple Myeloma - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Risk
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Firefighters are potentially exposed to a wide range of known and suspected carcinogens through their work. The objectives of this study were to examine the patterns of cancer among Nordic firefighters, and to compare them with the results from previous studies.
Data for this study were drawn from a linkage between the census data for 15 million people from the five Nordic countries and their cancer registries for the period 1961-2005. SIR analyses were conducted with the cancer incidence rates for the entire national study populations used as reference rates.
A total of 16 422 male firefighters were included in the final cohort. A moderate excess risk was seen for all cancer sites combined, (SIR=1.06, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.11). There were statistically significant excesses in the age category of 30-49 years in prostate cancer (SIR=2.59, 95% CI 1.34 to 4.52) and skin melanoma (SIR=1.62, 95% CI 1.14 to 2.23), while there was almost no excess in the older ages. By contrast, an increased risk, mainly in ages of 70 years and higher, was observed for non-melanoma skin cancer (SIR=1.40, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.76), multiple myeloma (SIR=1.69, 95% CI 1.08 to 2.51), adenocarcinoma of the lung (SIR=1.90, 95% CI 1.34 to 2.62), and mesothelioma (SIR=2.59, 95% CI 1.24 to 4.77). By contrast with earlier studies, the incidence of testicular cancer was decreased (SIR=0.51, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.98).
Some of these associations have been observed previously, and potential exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, asbestos and shift work involving disruption of circadian rhythms may partly explain these results.
Notes
Comment In: Occup Environ Med. 2014 Aug;71(8):525-624996680
PubMed ID
24510539 View in PubMed
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Cancer in the respiratory organs of Swedish farmers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25897
Source
Cancer. 1988 Mar 1;61(5):1055-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-1988
Author
K. Wiklund
G. Steineck
Author Affiliation
Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Cancer. 1988 Mar 1;61(5):1055-8
Date
Mar-1-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
Adult
Aged
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - etiology
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
In a cohort of 254,417 male Swedish farmers (4,330,717 person-years) the incidence of cancer of the respiratory organs was compared to a reference cohort of 1,725,845 men (30,131,664 person-years) employed in other economic activities than agriculture or forestry. In the study cohort 1450 cases of cancer in the respiratory organs were found in 1961 to 1979 resulting in an estimated relative risk (RR) of 0.38 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.36-0.40). For cancer of trachea, bronchus and lung, the decreased risk was equal for adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. No time related trend in RR for any of the histologic subtypes could be seen. However, for squamous cell carcinoma in nose and nasal sinuses RR has increased from 0.42 (95% CI: 0.20-0.80) in 1961 to 1966 to 2.06 (95% CI: 1.22-3.50) in 1974 to 1979.
PubMed ID
3338050 View in PubMed
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78 records – page 1 of 8.