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Adenocarcinoma in the distal esophagus with and without Barrett esophagus. Differences in symptoms and survival rates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22589
Source
Arch Surg. 1996 Jul;131(7):708-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1996
Author
J. Johansson
F. Johnsson
B. Walther
R. Willén
C. Staël von Holstein
T. Zilling
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Lund University, Sweden.
Source
Arch Surg. 1996 Jul;131(7):708-13
Date
Jul-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - complications - mortality - surgery
Aged
Barrett Esophagus - complications
Esophageal Neoplasms - complications - mortality - surgery
Female
Humans
Lymphatic Metastasis
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Rate
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate differences in clinical appearance and survival rates in patients operated on for adenocarcinoma in the distal esophagus with and without Barrett epithelium. DESIGN: Prospective clinical study. SETTING: University hospital, Sweden. PATIENTS: Fifty-four patients with adenocarcinoma in the distal esophagus with (n = 17) or without (n = 37) Barrett epithelium. INTERVENTION: Esophagectomy or total gastrectomy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Preoperative symptoms, endoscopic results, and histological findings; postoperative morbidity, mortality, and survival rates. RESULTS: The main indication for the endoscopic examination that revealed tumor in the group with Barrett esophagus was reflex-related symptoms in 6 patients (routine Barrett examination, n = 4; symptoms of reflux, n = 2), symptoms related to upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding in 6, and malignant symptoms in 5 (dysphagia, n = 4; weight loss, n = 1). In contrast, most patients in the cardia cancer group were admitted because of malignant symptoms (dysphagia, n = 26; epigastric pain, n = 9; and anemia, n = 2). Ten of 17 patients in the Barrett esophagus cancer group had tumors limited to the mucosa and submucosa only. In 1 patient the tumor grew into the muscular layer but not through it. In the remaining 6 patients the tumor did grow through the muscular layer and lymph node metastases were found. Wall penetration was found in 30 patients and metastases to lymph nodes in 29 patients in the cardia cancer group. The hospital mortality rate was 0 of 17 patients in the Barrett cancer group and 2 of 37 patients in the cardia cancer group. In the patients operated on for adenocarcinoma in the distal esophagus, a better long-term survival rate was seen in those with Barrett epithelium (50%) than in those without this metaplasia (10%) (log rank P = .005; X2 = 7.80). CONCLUSIONS: Concomitant Barrett epithelium improved the prognosis for patients with adenocarcinoma in the distal esophagus. Probably the reason for this was a higher rate of early-stage disease, because symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux and other benign disorders, not dysphagia, were most common in patients with adenocarcinoma without Barrett epithelium in the distal esophagus.
PubMed ID
8678768 View in PubMed
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Association of Comorbidity with Anastomotic Leak, 30-day Mortality, and Length of Stay in Elective Surgery for Colonic Cancer: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266856
Source
Dis Colon Rectum. 2015 Jul;58(7):668-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Peter-Martin Krarup
Andreas Nordholm-Carstensen
Lars Nannestad Jorgensen
Henrik Harling
Source
Dis Colon Rectum. 2015 Jul;58(7):668-76
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - complications - mortality - surgery
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anastomotic Leak - mortality
Cohort Studies
Colectomy
Colonic Neoplasms - complications - mortality - surgery
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Elective Surgical Procedures - adverse effects - mortality
Female
Humans
Length of Stay
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
ROC Curve
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
Comorbidity has a negative influence on the long-term prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer, whereas its impact on the postoperative course is less clear.
The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of comorbidity on anastomotic leak and short-term outcomes after resection for colonic cancer.
This is a retrospective nationwide cohort study
: Data were obtained from the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group and the National Patient Registry.
Patients with colonic cancer undergoing elective resection between 2001 and 2008 were selected.
The primary outcome was the ability of comorbidity to predict anastomotic leak. Secondary outcomes were 30-day mortality and length of stay. Comorbidity was assessed by the Charlson Comorbidity Index. Multivariable logistic regression and receiver operating characteristics curves were used to adjust for confounding.
The rate of anastomotic leak was 535/8597 (6.2%). The mean (95% CI) Charlson score was 0.83 (0.72-0.94) and 0.63 (0.61-0.66) for patients with and without anastomotic leak, p 2, p
PubMed ID
26200681 View in PubMed
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[Surgical results in lung cancer in women].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237920
Source
Vopr Onkol. 1986;32(3):61-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
R I Vagner
V A Shutkin
Source
Vopr Onkol. 1986;32(3):61-7
Date
1986
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - complications - mortality - surgery
Age Factors
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - complications - mortality - surgery
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - complications - mortality - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumonectomy - mortality
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology - mortality
Russia
Sex Factors
Abstract
The paper deals with the immediate and long-term results of treatment of 173 female and 1,330 male patients with lung cancer operated on at the Department of Lung and Mediastinal Tumors of the Institute in 1960-1979. The results of radical surgery were better in females: 5-year survival rate was 1.5 times that in males (44.4% vs 31.4%) whereas at 10 years it was twice as high (35.5 vs 17.2%).
PubMed ID
2938333 View in PubMed
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