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The 10th Scientific Meeting of the European Society for Psychosocial Oncology (ESPO). Stockholm, Sweden, June 14-17, 1998. Abstracts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21463
Source
Psychooncology. 1998 May-Jun;7(3):149-96
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Source
Psychooncology. 1998 May-Jun;7(3):149-96
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Humans
Neoplasms - psychology
Social Support
PubMed ID
9741976 View in PubMed
Less detail

Development and psychometric testing of the Adaptive Capacity Index, an instrument to measure adaptive capacity in individuals with advanced cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136890
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2011 Aug;48(8):986-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
K. Olson
W T Rogers
Y. Cui
M. Cree
V. Baracos
T. Rust
I. Mellott
L. Johnson
K. Macmillan
N. Bonville
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, The University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Karin.Olson@ualberta.ca
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2011 Aug;48(8):986-94
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Canada
Humans
Neoplasms - psychology
Psychometrics
Abstract
We have proposed that declines in adaptive capacity, defined as the ability to adapt to multiple stressors, may serve as an indicator of risk for fatigue. A comprehensive measure of adaptive capacity does not exist.
In this paper we describe construction of an instrument to measure adaptive capacity, the Adaptive Capacity Index (ACI).
Descriptive and psychometric.
Six sites providing palliative care in Western Canada.
=18 years old, diagnosed with advanced cancer, able to read and write English, Mini-Mental Status Exam score =22. Pilot study n=48; Main study n=225 stratified using the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) tiredness score (=0 to =2 n=60; =3 to =6 n=108; =7 and =10 n=57).
Following ethics approval, 17 experts in symptom management assisted with content validation and consenting individuals completed the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Fatigue (FACT-F), the Profile of Mood States-Vigor short form (POMS-Vsf), and the ACI. A research assistant collected demographic information and assigned an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics (i.e., exploratory factor analyses, correlation, multivariate analyses of variance, and multiple regression).
Five 6-item ACI factors/subscales (Cognitive Function, Stamina/Muscle Endurance, Sleep Quality, Emotional Reactivity, and Social Interaction) were identified. The ACI-total scale and its subscales were internally consistent (Cronbach's alpha 0.76-0.89), and were significantly correlated with each other, and with each fatigue measure (Pearson's r ranging from -0.724 to 0.634). The ACI total score was sensitive to changes in the ESAS tiredness score. Stamina/Muscle Endurance, Cognitive Function, and Sleep Quality predicted 60.8% of the variance in FACT-F. Stamina/Muscle Endurance and Social Interaction predicted 36.8% of the variance in POMS-Vsf. Stamina/Muscle Endurance and Sleep Quality predicted 8% of the variance in ECOG.
The ACI is reliable and has beginning evidence of validity. In future studies we will examine relationships between ACI subscale scores and subsequent increases in fatigue and explore linkages to physiological processes. We will also establish ACI norms for early and late stage cancers and explore variations in ACI subscale scores base on age or gender.
PubMed ID
21333991 View in PubMed
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Spiritual coping in rehabilitation - a comparative study: part 1.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115961
Source
Br J Nurs. 2013 Feb 28-Mar 13;22(4):228-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
Donia Baldacchino
Kristina Torskenaes
Mary Kalfoss
Josette Borg
Aaron Tonna
Clifford Debattista
Neville Decelis
Rodianne Mifsud
Author Affiliation
University of Malta, Malta.
Source
Br J Nurs. 2013 Feb 28-Mar 13;22(4):228-32
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Humans
Malta
Norway
Rehabilitation
Spirituality
Abstract
Chronic illness is defined as a long-term disease that challenges a person's physical, psychological and spiritual wellbeing. However, individuals may adapt to their condition by adopting spiritual coping strategies that may or may not include religiosity. Part 1 of this article presents the methodology of this cross-sectional comparative study, which explored the spiritual coping of patients with chronic illness receiving rehabilitation services in Malta (n=44: lower limb amputation n=10; chronic heart disease n=9; osteoarthritis-in an institution n=10 and in the community n=15); and in Norway (n=16: post-hip/shoulder surgery n=5; chronic heart disease n=5; chronic pain n=6). Data were collected from seven purposive samples during focus group sessions. Roy's Adaptation Model (1984) and Neuman's Systems Model (2010) guided the study. While acknowledging the limitations of this study, the findings presented in Part 2 identify commonalities in the spiritual coping of patients irrespective of cultural differences between Malta and Norway. A set of recommendations address clinical practice, education and further research.
PubMed ID
23448986 View in PubMed
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Source
Palliat Support Care. 2010 Sep;8(3):245-6
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
William Breitbart
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2010 Sep;8(3):245-6
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Humans
Neoplasms - psychology
Quebec
Social Support
PubMed ID
20875167 View in PubMed
Less detail

Facilitating and inhibiting factors in transition to parenthood - ways in which health professionals can support parents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292125
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2017 Sep; 31(3):537-546
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Mia Barimani
Anna Vikström
Michael Rosander
Karin Forslund Frykedal
Anita Berlin
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Division of Reproductive Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2017 Sep; 31(3):537-546
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Health Personnel
Humans
Parents
Sweden
Abstract
The transition to parenthood is an overwhelming life event. From a theoretical perspective, transition to parenthood is a developmental transition that contains certain phases and patterns.
This study aim was twofold (i) discover, describe and comprehend transitional conditions that parents perceive as facilitating and inhibiting during transition to parenthood and to (ii) use that knowledge to develop recommendations for professional interventions that support and facilitate transition to parenthood.
Meleis transition theory framed the study's deductive qualitative approach - from planning to analysis.
In a secondary analysis, data were analysed (as per Meleis transition theory) from two studies that implemented interviews with 60 parents in Sweden between 2013 and 2014. Interview questions dealt with parents' experiences of the transition to parenthood - in relation to experiences with parent-education groups, professional support and continuity after childbirth.
A university research ethics board has approved the research.
These factors facilitated transition to parenthood: perceiving parenthood as a normal part of life; enjoying the child's growth; being prepared and having knowledge; experiencing social support; receiving professional support, receiving information about resources within the health care; participating in well-functioning parent-education groups; and hearing professionals comment on gender differences as being complementary. These factors inhibited transition to parenthood: having unrealistic expectations; feeling stress and loss of control; experiencing breastfeeding demands and lack of sleep; facing a judgmental attitude about breastfeeding; being unprepared for reality; lacking information about reality; lacking professional support and information; lacking healthcare resources; participating in parent-education groups that did not function optimally; and hearing professionals accentuate gender differences in a problematic way.
Transition theory is appropriate for helping professionals understand and identify practices that might support parents during transition to parenthood. The study led to certain recommendations that are important for professionals to consider.
PubMed ID
28144992 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Helping the family of the schizophrenic patient].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231110
Source
Can Nurse. 1989 Mar;85(3):40-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1989
Author
M. Bourassa
C. Lacombe
Source
Can Nurse. 1989 Mar;85(3):40-4
Date
Mar-1989
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Day Care
Family
Humans
Quebec
Schizophrenia
Abstract
The authors, nurses who run a day program out of Centre hospitalier Ste-Thérèse de Shawinigan to help friends or families of schizophrenic patients, explore what makes the service so successful. Called Centre Info-Famille-Contact-Schizo, it was the brainstorm of psychiatrist Dr. Pierre Lalonde, who maintains that such families need information and support; after all, they are true allies of the patient.
PubMed ID
2924279 View in PubMed
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Occupational Case Analysis Interview and Rating Scale. An examination of construct validity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190033
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1999;13(4):267-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
J S Lai
L. Haglund
G. Kielhofner
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Health and Human Development Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, USA.
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1999;13(4):267-73
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Occupations
Sweden
Abstract
The Occupational Case Analysis Interview and Rating Scale (OCAIRS) was developed based on the Model of Human Occupation with the intention of assessing patients' occupational adaptation. Several studies examining the quality of this instrument have been completed; however, none have discussed the internal validity of the instrument or the appropriateness of the rating scale. The purpose of this study is to validate the internal validity of the OCAIRS and to test the quality of the rating scale. The results indicate that the OCAIRS is a valid measure of occupational adaptation. Each item was shown to have its own rating scale structure, however, all items together still shared the same five-point rating scale.
PubMed ID
12032924 View in PubMed
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[Psychiatry in the national defense: the interest of the individual and the national defense often harmonize].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109027
Source
Lakartidningen. 1971 Feb 17;68(8):815-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-17-1971
Author
B. Blomquist
C J Clemedson
Source
Lakartidningen. 1971 Feb 17;68(8):815-7
Date
Feb-17-1971
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Humans
Military Psychiatry
Psychophysiologic Disorders
Sweden
PubMed ID
5546728 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1992 Jun;39(3):273-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1992
Author
H J Andersen
Author Affiliation
Development Center AEPC, Lemvig.
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1992 Jun;39(3):273-4
Date
Jun-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Behavior
Denmark
Habits
Humans
Time Factors
Abstract
On-going restructuring in the Danish care for the elderly is to a very high degree based on recognition of the significance of habits and rituals, as well on the knowledge of what is needed to alter them. Habits and rituals are concepts that are often confused in everyday patterns of thought. It is necessary to be able to distinguish between the two concepts before change can be effected. To varying degrees people are characterised by unconscious and conscious habits as well as inherited and personal rituals. Personal development, age, support from one's surroundings, and so on, determine the degree to which a person may continue or alter acquired patterns of habit and ritual.
PubMed ID
1638900 View in PubMed
Less detail

Health care students' personal experiences and coping with bullying in clinical training.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267666
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2014 Jan;34(1):138-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Henna-Riikka Hakojärvi
Leena Salminen
Riitta Suhonen
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2014 Jan;34(1):138-44
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Bullying
Finland
Humans
Students, Health Occupations - psychology
Abstract
Previous studies show that health care students have experienced bullying by nursing staff in clinical training. Although these studies provide plenty of information considering the manifestation and consequences of bullying on students, there is a gap of knowledge on how health care students' cope with bullying. In addition, previous studies seem to have focused only on the experiences of nursing and midwifery students. This paper presents the results of a qualitative study exploring the bullying experiences of Finnish health care students (n=41) representing two Universities of Applied Sciences. In order to provide information for faculties of health care on bullying intervention and prevention strategies, this study aimed at describing health care students' experiences and coping with bullying in clinical training. Based on previous study findings, an electronic semi-structured questionnaire was developed for the data collection. The qualitative data was analysed using inductive content analysis. The results show that the students experienced verbal and non-verbal bullying in clinical training. In addition to psychological and physical symptoms, bullying also decreased the students' learning, their studying motivation and their professional engagement. One reason why some students did not share their bullying experiences with their teachers and clinical instructors was their idea that sharing their experiences would be useless. On the other hand, students who did share their experiences with a teacher or a clinical instructor usually received emotional support, information, and help in the form of bullying intervention. The results of this study suggest that faculties of health care need to develop action plans against bullying in co-operation with clinical training sites in order to ensure students' learning and professional engagement. In the future, it is suggested that research is focused on factors preventing and contributing to bullying towards health care students.
PubMed ID
23021404 View in PubMed
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3460 records – page 1 of 346.