Skip header and navigation

Refine By

25 records – page 1 of 3.

[Adaptive capacities of children with different number of congenital morphogenetic variants].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127921
Source
Gig Sanit. 2011 Nov-Dec;(6):69-73
Publication Type
Article
Author
E N Kotysheva
M Iu Bolotskaia
Source
Gig Sanit. 2011 Nov-Dec;(6):69-73
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological - drug effects - genetics
Adaptation, Psychological - drug effects
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Autonomic Nervous System - drug effects - growth & development - physiology
Child
Environmental monitoring
Genetic Variation
Humans
Metallurgy
Morphogenesis - drug effects - genetics
Russia
Urban Population
Abstract
Adaptive capacities were studied in 6-7-year-ol apparently healthy children in relation to the number of congenital morphogenetic variants (CMVs). The most markedly reduced adaptive capacities were revealed in children with 5 CMVs or more.
PubMed ID
22250398 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Agents for combined pharmacotherapy in severe trauma to the brain and ENT organs].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199091
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1999 Dec;320(12):20-3, 96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
Iu K Ianov
A T Grechko
L A Glaznikov
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1999 Dec;320(12):20-3, 96
Date
Dec-1999
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adaptation, Physiological - drug effects
Brain Injuries - drug therapy - physiopathology
Double-Blind Method
Drug Therapy, Combination
Ear - injuries
Humans
Military Personnel
Nose - injuries
Pharynx - injuries
Russia
Time Factors
Abstract
Early complex treatment of a critical brain traumas should be aimed not only at men's life and personality saving, but also at their performance' rehabilitation. Complicity and to some degree individual nature of a critical trauma pathogenesis depend on the associative active methods of surgery interference and conservative pharmacotherapy. The article deals with well-practiced means and methods of symptomatic pharmacotherapy at the early and later stages of the brain traumas with vestibular and hearing system injures and with theoretical and clinical base for modern "quick-action adaptogens" usage in addition to psychoneurocorrectors.
PubMed ID
10732478 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Analysis of some parameters of biological age and adaptation possibilities of workers of locomotive brigades].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123355
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2012;25(1):57-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
V A Nazimko
E V Morgul'
O A Petrova
R G Sheikhova
L S Kozina
M A Savenko
D S Lysenko
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2012;25(1):57-62
Date
2012
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological - drug effects
Aging, Premature - blood - etiology - genetics - prevention & control - psychology
Antioxidants - administration & dosage - metabolism - therapeutic use
Case-Control Studies
Chromosome Aberrations - drug effects - statistics & numerical data
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Erythrocytes - drug effects - metabolism
Humans
Lipid Peroxides - blood
Lymphocytes - drug effects - metabolism
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Oligopeptides - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Phagocytosis - drug effects
Railroads
Russia
Abstract
The unfavorable factors of professional work of workers of locomotive brigades influence on speed of aging and adaptation possibilities of an organism. Analysis of the data obtained confirms the positive use of the peptide bioregulator Pinealon in maintenance the professional reliability of workers of locomotive brigades. Workers of locomotive brigades used preparation during two weeks (1 capsule containing 100 mkg of Pinealon 2 times a day). Pinealon application has improved parameters of biological age and indicators determining the effectiveness of adaptive reactions.
PubMed ID
22708445 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Disorders of myocardial contractile function and the mechanisms of their compensation in ischemic heart disease in man]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11356
Source
Fiziol Zh. 1995 Sep-Dec;41(5-6):70-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
O O Moibenko
H A Hryhorash
M V Kostylev
Source
Fiziol Zh. 1995 Sep-Dec;41(5-6):70-9
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological - drug effects
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Aged
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Heart Function Tests - drug effects
Hemodynamic Processes - drug effects - physiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Contraction - drug effects - physiology
Myocardial Ischemia - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Propranolol - therapeutic use
Abstract
Myocardial contractile function was investigated in 84 patients with coronary diseases CD of I-IV functional classes (according to NYHA) and 17 persons with normal coronary arteries using new noninvasive method of construction LV end-systolic pressure-volume relation (ESPVR). Significant decrease of end-systolic elastance, ejection fraction, circumferential fibers shortening velocity and increase of end-systolic and end-diastolic ventricular volume was increased with patient's class number. These data correlated with the increase of total amount of lesion of coronary vessels and extension of asynergic zones. But this contractile function disturbances were not accompanied by significant changes of cardiac output and arterial pressure. When blocking beta-adrenergic receptors with anaprillin it was established that at early stages of CD the compensation of contractile function disturbances is reached via the increasing of heart adrenergic stimulation, and in the patients of III-IV classes the Frank-Starling's law becomes of great significance homo- and heterometric mechanisms efficiency reduces with CD development. These data show that ESPVR reconstruction before and after the blocking of beta-adrenergic receptors allows systolic LV function and efficiency of its regulation to be estimated.
PubMed ID
9026397 View in PubMed
Less detail

Do human lymphocytes exposed to the fallout of the Chernobyl accident exhibit an adaptive response? 2. Challenge with bleomycin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35116
Source
Mutat Res. 1995 Nov;332(1-2):39-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1995
Author
B. Tedeschi
D. Caporossi
P. Vernole
L. Padovani
M. Appolloni
P. Anzidei
F. Mauro
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Cell Biology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy.
Source
Mutat Res. 1995 Nov;332(1-2):39-44
Date
Nov-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adaptation, Physiological - drug effects
Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic - pharmacology
Bleomycin - pharmacology
Cells, Cultured
Child
Chromosome Aberrations
DNA Damage - drug effects - radiation effects
DNA Repair - drug effects
Female
Humans
Lymphocytes - drug effects - radiation effects
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ukraine
Abstract
The present study concerns the possible adaptive response, induced in vivo by a continuous exposure to ionizing radiations, to a challenge treatment with the radiomimetic glycopeptide bleomycin (BLM). Lymphocytes from children contaminated as a consequence of Chernobyl accident were treated for the last 5 h of culture with 2.5 micrograms/ml BLM. The induced chromosome damage was significantly lower than that found with the same treatment in lymphocytes from control children. This hyposensitivity to BLM was still present if, 1 h after the addition of the drug, inhibitors of the enzymes involved in DNA repair, such as 3-aminobenzamide (2 mM), or aphidicolin (0.4 microM) or 3-dideoxythymidine (5 mM) were added to the cultures. The resistance to BLM in lymphocytes from contaminated children seems to be related to a mechanism upstream in respect to the activities of enzymes involved in the DNA repair and specifically linked to the action of this drug. This is consistent with the different response found when the cells were challenged with ionizing radiation in vitro, as reported in the accompanying paper (L. Padovani, L. et al. (1995) Mutation Res., this issue).
Notes
Erratum In: Mutat Res 1996 Sep 23;356(2):299-300
PubMed ID
7500990 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evidence that tolerance of Eutrema salsugineum to low phosphate conditions is hard-wired by constitutive metabolic and root-associated adaptations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307941
Source
Planta. 2019 Nov 28; 251(1):18
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-28-2019
Author
Vera Marjorie Elauria Velasco
Solmaz Irani
Anna Axakova
Rosa da Silva
Peter S Summers
Elizabeth A Weretilnyk
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4K1, Canada.
Source
Planta. 2019 Nov 28; 251(1):18
Date
Nov-28-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological - drug effects
Arabidopsis - drug effects - physiology
Brassicaceae - drug effects - enzymology - metabolism - physiology
Darkness
Glycolysis - drug effects
Phosphates - pharmacology
Phosphoprotein Phosphatases - metabolism
Plant Leaves - drug effects - growth & development
Plant Roots - drug effects - enzymology - physiology
Rhizosphere
Seedlings - drug effects - enzymology - growth & development
Soil
Abstract
The extremophyte Eutrema salsugineum (Yukon ecotype) has adapted to an environment low in available phosphate through metabolic and root-associated traits that enables it to efficiently retrieve, use, and recycle phosphorus. Efficient phosphate (Pi) use by plants would increase crop productivity under Pi-limiting conditions and reduce our reliance on Pi applied as fertilizer. An ecotype of Eutrema salsugineum originating from the Yukon, Canada, shows no evidence of decreased relative growth rate or biomass under low Pi conditions and, as such, offers a promising model for identifying mechanisms to improve Pi use by crops. We evaluated traits associated with efficient Pi use by Eutrema (Yukon ecotype) seedlings and 4-week-old plants, including acquisition, remobilization, and the operation of metabolic bypasses. Relative to Arabidopsis, Eutrema was slower to remobilize phosphorus (P) from senescing leaves, primary and lateral roots showed a lower capacity for rhizosphere acidification, and root acid phosphatase activity was more broadly distributed and not Pi responsive. Both species produced long root hairs on low Pi media, whereas Arabidopsis root hairs were well endowed with phosphatase activity. This capacity was largely absent in Eutrema. In contrast to Arabidopsis, maximal in vitro rates of pyrophosphate-dependent phosphofructokinase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activities were not responsive to low Pi conditions suggesting that Eutrema has a constitutive and likely preferential capacity to use glycolytic bypass enzymes. Rhizosphere acidification, exudation of acid phosphatases, and rapid remobilization of leaf P are unlikely strategies used by Eutrema for coping with low Pi. Rather, equipping an entire root system for Pi acquisition and utilizing a metabolic strategy suited to deficient Pi conditions offer better explanations for how Eutrema has adapted to thrive on alkaline, highly saline soil that is naturally low in available Pi.
PubMed ID
31781937 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Influence of long-term combined gamma-radiation and ethanol on cytochrome P450 2E1 expression in the mice liver]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89838
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2008 Sep-Oct;80(5):105-11
Publication Type
Article
Author
Maksymchuk O V
Bobyk V I
Sydoryk L L
Chashchyn M O
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2008 Sep-Oct;80(5):105-11
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological - drug effects - radiation effects
Animals
Cytochrome P-450 CYP2E1 - biosynthesis - genetics
Ethanol - toxicity
Free Radicals - metabolism
Gamma Rays - adverse effects
Gene Expression - drug effects - radiation effects
Liver - drug effects - enzymology - radiation effects
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Oxidative Stress - drug effects - radiation effects
Time Factors
Abstract
The effect of continuous single and combined influence of exogenous stress factors (ethanol and low intensity gamma-radiation) on cytochrome P450 2E1 (1.14.14.1) expression in mice liver was studied. The chronic ethanol intake induced Cyp2E1 protein expression but not increased Cyp2e1 mRNA level. The first week of continuous combined influence of ethanol and gamma-irradiation was characterized by the increase of Cyp2E1 protein level, that was back to normal on second week. A small decrease of this index was observed at the end of the fifth week. The changes of Cyp2E1 protein amount accompanied the decrease of Cyp2e1 mRNA level.
PubMed ID
19248623 View in PubMed
Less detail

Influence of two beta-adrenoceptor antagonists, propranolol and pindolol, on cold adaptation in the rat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12199
Source
Br J Pharmacol. 1990 Apr;99(4):673-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1990
Author
M L Kortelainen
P. Huttunen
T. Lapinlampi
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Br J Pharmacol. 1990 Apr;99(4):673-8
Date
Apr-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological - drug effects
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists
Animals
Body Temperature - drug effects
Body Weight - drug effects
Brown Fat - drug effects - metabolism
Catecholamines - urine
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Cold
Comparative Study
Heart Rate - drug effects
Male
Mitochondria - drug effects - enzymology - metabolism
Oxidation-Reduction
Pindolol - pharmacology
Propranolol - pharmacology
Rats
Urodynamics - drug effects
Abstract
1. Adult male rats were treated with propranolol (2.0 mg kg-1 day-1 i.p.), pindolol (0.2 mg kg-1 day-1 i.p.) or 0.9% NaCl day-1 i.p. and exposed to +4 degrees C for 42 days, or treated with 0.9% NaCl day-1 i.p. and kept at +23 degrees C for 42 days. They were weighed once a week, when a 24 h urine sample was also collected and colon temperature measured. 2. Urinary noradrenaline (NA), adrenaline (Ad) and dopamine were analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography with an electrochemical detector. After the acclimatization period the interscapular brown adipose tissue was excised and weighed and the activity of the oxidative enzymes succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome oxidase measured. 3. The pindolol-treated and propranolol-treated rats gained weight during the cold-acclimatization period. The amount of interscapular brown adipose tissue increased in the cold, but the increase was lowest in the pindolol-treated group. No changes were seen in the other brown adipose tissue parameters in cold-exposed animals. The excretion of catecholamines followed the same pattern in all three cold-exposed groups, with an initial rise in noradrenaline and adrenaline excretion and a slight rise in dopamine excretion. 4. The results suggest possible connections between beta-adrenoceptor antagonists, weight gain and cold acclimatization. Pindolol had a slight inhibitory effect on cold-induced brown adipose tissue hypertrophy in rats.
PubMed ID
1972890 View in PubMed
Less detail

25 records – page 1 of 3.