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Acute child poisonings in Oslo: a 2-year prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84591
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2007 Sep;96(9):1355-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Rajka Thomas
Heyerdahl Fridtjof
Hovda Knut Erik
Stiksrud Birgitte
Jacobsen Dag
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatric Intensive Care, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2007 Sep;96(9):1355-9
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Catchment Area (Health)
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Poisoning - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Abstract
AIM: To study the current epidemiology, clinical course and outcome of poisonings among children in Oslo and compare findings to a similar study from 1980. METHODS: Observational study with prospective inclusion of all children ( or = 8 years ingested mainly ethanol (46%) or pharmaceuticals (36%). Five percent of all children were comatose, and complications were seen in 13%. All children survived without sequelae. Half of the admissions needed treatment; most commonly used treatments were activated charcoal (33%), gastric lavage (9%) and emetics (9%). CONCLUSION: The incidence of child poisonings in Oslo has significantly reduced since 1980. Only half of the poisonings needed treatment, most of the poisonings were mild and the clinical outcome was good.
PubMed ID
17718791 View in PubMed
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Acute hepatitis B and hepatitis D co-infection in the Stockholm region in the 1970s and 1980s--a comparison.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12134
Source
Infection. 1990 Nov-Dec;18(6):357-60
Publication Type
Article
Author
G. Lindh
L. Mattsson
M. von Sydow
O. Weiland
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska Institute, Roslagstull Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Infection. 1990 Nov-Dec;18(6):357-60
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alanine Transaminase - blood
Bilirubin - blood
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Female
Hepatitis B - complications - epidemiology
Hepatitis D - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - complications
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The frequency and clinical features of acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection with and without a hepatitis D virus (HDV) co-infection was investigated retrospectively in the Stockholm region during two different time periods, September 1977-October 1978 and November 1984-October 1986. Totally, 31/229 (14%) patients with acute HBV infection had a HDV co-infection. No change in the frequency of co-infections, 12% and 15%, respectively, was observed between the 1970s and 1980s. Among the 31 HDV co-infected patients 74% were intravenous drug addicts. Totally 23/66 (35%) intravenous drug addicts with acute HBV infection had HDV co-infection. Clinically a biphasic rise of the serum levels of alanine aminotransferase and bilirubin was noted among 63% of the HDV co-infected patients but only among 8% of the solely HBV infected patients (p less than 0.001). A clinically more severe hepatitis was seen significantly more often among the HDV co-infected patients than among the solely HBV infected.
PubMed ID
2076908 View in PubMed
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Acute infections and venous thromboembolism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130192
Source
J Intern Med. 2012 Jun;271(6):608-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
M. Schmidt
E. Horvath-Puho
R W Thomsen
L. Smeeth
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. morten.schmidt@dce.au.dk
Source
J Intern Med. 2012 Jun;271(6):608-18
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aged
Algorithms
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacteremia - complications
Bacterial Infections - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Case-Control Studies
Community-Acquired Infections - complications
Cross Infection - complications - drug therapy
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
Intraabdominal Infections - complications
Logistic Models
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Outpatients - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Pulmonary Embolism - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Respiratory Tract Infections - complications
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Skin Diseases, Bacterial - complications
Urinary Tract Infections - complications
Venous Thromboembolism - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Data on the association between acute infections and venous thromboembolism (VTE) are sparse. We examined whether various hospital-diagnosed infections or infections treated in the community increase the risk of VTE.
We conducted this population-based case-control study in Northern Denmark (population 1.8 million) using medical databases. We identified all patients with a first hospital-diagnosed VTE during the period 1999-2009 (n = 15 009). For each case, we selected 10 controls from the general population matched for age, gender and county of residence (n = 150 074). We identified all hospital-diagnosed infections and community prescriptions for antibiotics 1 year predating VTE. We used odds ratios from a conditional logistic regression model to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of VTE within different time intervals of the first year after infection, controlling for confounding.
Respiratory tract, urinary tract, skin, intra-abdominal and bacteraemic infections diagnosed in hospital or treated in the community were associated with a greater than equal to twofold increased VTE risk. The association was strongest within the first 2 weeks after infection onset, gradually declining thereafter. Compared with individuals without infection during the year before VTE, the IRR for VTE within the first 3 months after infection was 12.5 (95% confidence interval (CI): 11.3-13.9) for patients with hospital-diagnosed infection and 4.0 (95% CI: 3.8-4.1) for patients treated with antibiotics in the community. Adjustment for VTE risk factors reduced these IRRs to 3.3 (95% CI: 2.9-3.8) and 2.6 (95% CI: 2.5-2.8), respectively. Similar associations were found for unprovoked VTE and for deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism individually.
Infections are a risk factor for VTE.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22026462 View in PubMed
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[Acute lumbago prevalence of health workers exposed to a moderate level of exposure index MAPO]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85660
Source
G Ital Med Lav Ergon. 2007 Jul-Sep;29(3 Suppl):572-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
Mazzotta M.
D'Ettorre G.
Cazzato R G
De Giorgio N.
Author Affiliation
ASL Brindisi - U.O. Medicina del Lavoro, Servizio Prevenzione e Protezione.
Source
G Ital Med Lav Ergon. 2007 Jul-Sep;29(3 Suppl):572-3
Language
Italian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Personnel
Humans
Low Back Pain - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Prevalence
Weight-Bearing
Abstract
We conduced a cross sectional study in the period Gen - Dec 2006 to examine the relationship between acute lumbago in health workers and exposition to a moderate level of exposure index Movement and Assistance of Hospital Patients (MAPO). The study ruled 240 health workers (M: 180; F: 60), the mean age was 44,9 years (range 24 - 64); was evaluated the occurrence of acute lumbago in the last 12 months. The objective of this study was to describe the trends over a specific time of the association between the moderate MAPO index and acute lumbago in this sample of health care workers. The results indicate that healthcare workers exposed to moderate MAPO index appear to incur a greater risk of acute lumbago than general population, but lower than that evidenced by Italian and Sweden authors between nursing staffs. Medical surveillance of exposed workers is confirmed as necessary method of secondary prevention and also it is useful in the diagnosis of worker's susceptibilities.
PubMed ID
18409839 View in PubMed
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Acute mastoidectomy in a Danish county from 1977 to 1997--operative findings and long-term results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32665
Source
Acta Otolaryngol Suppl. 2000;543:122-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
C G Petersen
T. Ovesen
C B Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Ear, Nose and Throat Department, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Acta Otolaryngol Suppl. 2000;543:122-6
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Catchment Area (Health)
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - microbiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Mastoiditis - epidemiology - microbiology - surgery
Otitis Media with Effusion - microbiology
Otologic Surgical Procedures - methods - statistics & numerical data
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Tympanic Membrane - microbiology
Abstract
Data from patients undergoing acute mastoidectomy were examined retrospectively to evaluate if the nature of acute mastoiditis (AM) treated surgically has changed during the last 20 years (1977-97). Moreover, a prevalence study was conducted to clarify the otological and audiological course following acute mastoidectomy. Patients with cholesteatoma and intracranial complications were excluded. Thus, 79 patients with a median age of 16 months were included. Thirty-seven percent had a history of middle ear disease, and the mean duration from onset of symptoms to admission was 9 days. Well-being was affected in 46%, and 82% had fever. The clinical picture was dominated by auricular protrusion (77%) and pathological tympanic membrane (94%). Postauricular oedema, hyperaemia and tenderness were demonstrated in 89%, 78% and 49% of cases, respectively. Peroperatively, purulent middle ear effusion was recognized in 92%, subperiosteal abscess in 66% and pus in the mastoid in 90%. Specimens revealed growth of pathogens in 58%, predominantly Gram-positive bacteria. The observation period was 1-20 years. The findings in operated ears were not significantly different from the contralateral non-operated ears concerning incidence of otitis media, hearing and ear canal volume. Conclusively, acute mastoidectomy is a safe and effective treatment to eliminate infection. The operation can be done with negligible risk and does not leave long-term sequelae.
PubMed ID
10908998 View in PubMed
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[Acute otitis--a problem affecting children, families and health services]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288143
Source
Nord Med. 1991;106(11):293-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
H J Puhakka
Author Affiliation
Kliniken för öron-, näsoch strupsjukdomar, Abo Universitets-centralsjukhus.
Source
Nord Med. 1991;106(11):293-6
Date
1991
Language
Swedish
Geographic Location
Finland
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Child Health Services - utilization
Child, Preschool
Combined Modality Therapy
English Abstract
Family Health
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Otitis Media - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prevalence
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The true incidence of acute otitis media appears to be on the increase. According to the findings of a number of studies, acute otitis affects 40 per cent of all children during the first years of life. In the article are discussed the prevalence, diagnosis, treatment, follow-up and prevention of acute otitis media in children.
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[Acute otitis--a problem affecting children, families and health services]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37327
Source
Nord Med. 1991;106(11):293-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
H J Puhakka
Author Affiliation
Kliniken för öron-, näsoch strupsjukdomar, Abo Universitets-centralsjukhus.
Source
Nord Med. 1991;106(11):293-6
Date
1991
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Child Health Services - utilization
Child, Preschool
Combined Modality Therapy
English Abstract
Family Health
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Otitis Media - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prevalence
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The true incidence of acute otitis media appears to be on the increase. According to the findings of a number of studies, acute otitis affects 40 per cent of all children during the first years of life. In the article are discussed the prevalence, diagnosis, treatment, follow-up and prevention of acute otitis media in children.
PubMed ID
1945805 View in PubMed
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Acute otitis media and age at onset among children in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33376
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 1999 Jan;119(1):65-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
P. Homøe
R B Christensen
P. Bretlau
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. rh03259@rh.dk
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 1999 Jan;119(1):65-71
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Age of Onset
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Otitis Media - epidemiology
Prevalence
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
This survey examines the age at onset of acute otitis media (AOM) in 591 unselected Greenlandic children aged 3, 4, 5 and 8 years from the two largest towns in Greenland. The attendance rate was 86%. Parental information about episodes of AOM was cross-checked in medical records, which were available for 95% of the children. AOM was defined as episodes with earache, otorrhoea or previous treatment for AOM, with written otoscopic evidence of AOM resulting in treatment with weak analgetics or antibiotics. Recurrent AOM (rAOM) was defined as > or = 5 AOM episodes since birth. In total, 66% of the children had experienced AOM at least once. Of all children, 40% had AOM during the first year of life. Median age of the first episode was 10 months (range: 1-84 months), and there was no sex difference. Children between 7 and 12 months of age were at highest risk of AOM. Children with rAOM had their first AOM episode at a significantly younger age than children with
PubMed ID
10219388 View in PubMed
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Acute otitis media and sociomedical risk factors among unselected children in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3493
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 1999 Jun 15;49(1):37-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-1999
Author
P. Homøe
R B Christensen
P. Bretlau
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. rh03259@rh.dk
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 1999 Jun 15;49(1):37-52
Date
Jun-15-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Male
Otitis Media - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Social Environment
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the sociomedical risk factors associated with episodes of acute otitis media (AOM), recurrent AOM (rAOM), and chronic otitis media (COM) in Greenlandic children and especially to point out children at high risk of rAOM (defined as > 5 AOM episodes since birth) and COM which are prevalent among Inuit children all over the Arctic. METHODS: The study design was cross-sectional and included 740 unselected children, 3, 4, 5, and 8-years-old, living in two major Greenlandic towns, Nuuk and Sisimiut. All children were otologically examined and the parents answered a questionnaire containing sociomedical variables including ethnicity, family history of OM, housing, insulation, crowding, daycare, passive cigarette smoking, breast feeding, type of diet, allergy, and chronic diseases. Historical data were cross-checked in medical records which also formed the basis for the drop-out analyses. Statistical analyses included frequency tests, calculation of odds ratio (OR), and multiple logistic regression. RESULTS: The attendance rate was 86%. Former episode of AOM was reported by 2/3 of the children, rAOM by 20%, and COM by 9%. The following variables were found significantly more often in children with AOM by simple frequency testing: Parental (OR = 1.83), sibling (OR = 1.62), and parental plus sibling (OR = 2.56) history of OM, crowding (OR = 5.55), long period of exclusive breast feeding ( > 4 months) (OR = 2.47), and recent acute disease (P = 0.034). The following variables were found significantly more often in children with rAOM or COM by simple frequency testing: Parental history of OM (OR = 1.60; OR = 2.11, respectively) and no recall of breast feeding (P = 0.005; P = 0.003, respectively). Also, COM was found significantly more often in children with two Greenlandic parents (OR = 3.07). A multiple logistic regression test denoted only parental history of OM (OR = 1.82) and long period of exclusive breast feeding (OR = 1.14) as significant predictors of AOM. CONCLUSIONS: Many of the risk factors usually associated with AOM could not be confirmed as risk factors in this survey. Parental history of OM and long period of exclusive breast feeding were the strongest factors associated with AOM in Greenlandic children and ethnicity was associated with COM. However, the study confirms that AOM is a multifactorial disease determined by a number of genetic and environmental factors.
PubMed ID
10428404 View in PubMed
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[Acute pneumonias in those working with chemical substances that irritate the respiratory tract].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227343
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1991;(11):13-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
N V Vladyko
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1991;(11):13-5
Date
1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Acute Disease
Chi-Square Distribution
Humans
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Pneumonia - chemically induced - epidemiology
Prevalence
Respiratory System - drug effects
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
A study was performed of acute pneumonia (AP) morbidity among the workers exposed to respiratory irritation inducing chemical substances, which revealed a marked AP prevalence in these professional groups. A qualitative analysis of the AP cases severity helped to establish some peculiarities of the disease course in workers exposed to minor concentrations of the chemical substances, which should be taken into account in diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and out-patient observation.
PubMed ID
1839789 View in PubMed
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129 records – page 1 of 13.