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The 39 item Parkinson's disease questionnaire (PDQ-39) revisited: implications for evidence based medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164059
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2007 Nov;78(11):1191-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Peter Hagell
Carita Nygren
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, PO Box 157, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden. Peter.Hagell@med.lu.se
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2007 Nov;78(11):1191-8
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antiparkinson Agents - therapeutic use
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - psychology
Disability Evaluation
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Levodopa - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Parkinson Disease - diagnosis - drug therapy - psychology
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sick Role
Sweden
Abstract
The 39 item Parkinson's disease questionnaire (PDQ-39) is the most widely used patient reported rating scale in Parkinson's disease. However, several fundamental measurement assumptions necessary for confident use and interpretation of the eight PDQ-39 scales have not been fully addressed.
Postal survey PDQ-39 data from 202 people with Parkinson's disease (54% men; mean age 70 years) were analysed regarding psychometric properties using traditional and Rasch measurement methods.
Data quality was good (mean missing item responses, 2%) and there was general support for the legitimacy of summing items within scales without weighting or standardisation. Score reliabilities were adequate (Cronbach's alpha 0.72-0.95; test-retest 0.76-0.93). The validity of the current grouping of items into scales was not supported by scaling success rates (mean 56.2%), or factor and Rasch analyses. All scales represented more health problems than that experienced by the sample (mean floor effect 15%) and showed compromised score precision towards the less severe end.
Our results provide general support for the acceptability and reliability of the PDQ-39. However, they also demonstrate limitations that have implications for the use of the PDQ-39 in clinical research. The grouping of items into scales appears overly complex and the meaning of scale scores is unclear, which hampers their interpretation. Suboptimal targeting limits measurement precision and, therefore, probably also responsiveness. These observations have implications for the role of the PDQ-39 in clinical trials and evidence based medicine. PDQ-39 derived endpoints should be interpreted and selected cautiously, particularly regarding small but clinically important effects among people with less severe problems.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17442762 View in PubMed
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Achieving therapeutic clarity in assisted personal body care: professional challenges in interactions with severely ill COPD patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155622
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Aug;17(16):2155-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Kirsten Lomborg
Marit Kirkevold
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, Institute of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. kl@nursingscience.au.dk
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Aug;17(16):2155-63
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Baths - nursing - psychology
Clinical Competence
Communication
Denmark
Dyspnea - etiology
Helping Behavior
Hospitals, University
Humans
Middle Aged
Negotiating - psychology
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - organization & administration - psychology
Patient Care Planning - organization & administration
Patient Participation - methods - psychology
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - nursing - psychology
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
This paper aims to present a theoretical account of professional nursing challenges involved in providing care to patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The study objectives are patients' and nurses' expectations, goals and approaches to assisted personal body care.
The provision of help with body care may have therapeutic qualities but there is only limited knowledge about the particularities and variations in specific groups of patients and the nurse-patient interactions required to facilitate patient functioning and well-being. For patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, breathlessness represents a particular challenge in the performance of body care sessions.
We investigated nurse-patient interactions during assisted personal body care, using grounded theory with a symbolic interaction perspective and a constant comparative method.
Twelve cases of nurse-patient interactions were analysed. Data were based on participant observation, individual interviews with patients and nurses and a standardized questionnaire on patients' breathlessness.
Nurses and patients seemed to put effort into the interaction and wanted to find an appropriate way of conducting the body care session according to the patients' specific needs. Achieving therapeutic clarity in nurse-patient interactions appeared to be an important concern, mainly depending on interactions characterized by: (i) reaching a common understanding of the patient's current conditions and stage of illness trajectory, (ii) negotiating a common scope and structuring body care sessions and (iii) clarifying roles.
It cannot be taken for granted that therapeutic qualities are achieved when nurses provide assistance with body care. If body care should have healing strength, the actual body care activities and the achievement of therapeutic clarity in nurses' interaction with patients' appear to be crucial.
The paper proposes that patients' integrity and comfort in the body care session should be given first priority and raises attention to details that nurses should take into account when assisting severely ill patients.
PubMed ID
18710375 View in PubMed
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Active or passive journeys and low back pain in adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49730
Source
Eur Spine J. 2003 Dec;12(6):581-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Astrid N Sjolie
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway. asjolie@hotmail.com
Source
Eur Spine J. 2003 Dec;12(6):581-8
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adolescent
Automobiles - statistics & numerical data
Bicycling - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise - physiology
Female
Humans
Low Back Pain - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Male
Norway
Physical Fitness - physiology
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sports - physiology
Vibration - adverse effects
Walking - physiology
Abstract
The objective of this cross-sectional study was to study associations between low back pain (LBP) and modes of transport to school and leisure activities among adolescents. The study population included all adolescents in eighth and ninth grade in two geographic areas in eastern Norway. Eighty-eight adolescents participated (mean age 14.7 years), making the response rate 84%. Data concerning active (walking/bicycling) and passive (bus/car) journeys were obtained from lists and maps from local authorities, and from the pupils, using a questionnaire that also included LBP, activities and wellbeing. Distance walked/bicycled to school was slightly shorter among those reporting LBP in bivariate analyses. Walking/bicycling more than 8 km weekly to regular activities was inversely associated with LBP in multivariate analysis (OR 0.3; 95% confidence interval 0.1-1.0). No associations were found between passive journeys and LBP. The results raise the question for future research of whether lack of active transport may be one cause behind the increase in juvenile LBP.
PubMed ID
12928857 View in PubMed
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Activities of daily living and quality of life in persons with muscular dystrophy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52337
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2001 Sep;33(5):206-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
B. Nätterlund
G. Ahlström
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden. birgitta.natterlund@ivo.oru.se
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2001 Sep;33(5):206-11
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Comparative Study
Disability Evaluation
Female
Geography
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Muscular Dystrophies - psychology
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Sex Factors
Statistics
Sweden
Abstract
The study concerns 77 adults with muscular dystrophy (mean age 49 years) in two counties in Sweden. The purpose was to investigate activities of daily living, quality of life and the relationship between these. Data collection was performed with "the Activity of Daily Living Staircase", "the Self-report Activity of Daily Living" and the Quality of Life Profile. The results indicated that over half of the subjects were dependent on others, chiefly in activities requiring mobility. Muscular dystrophy had mostly negative consequences, and nearly half stated that life would have offered more without it. Few significant diagnosis-related (no gender-related) differences emerged regarding activities of daily living and quality of life. Lower quality of life can only partly be explained by greater disability (r=0.30-0.54). Therefore quality of life as a measurement of rehabilitation outcomes might be based both on physical status, disability and psychosocial factors in terms of positive and negative consequences.
PubMed ID
11585151 View in PubMed
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Activity of daily living performance amongst Danish asylum seekers: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266272
Source
Torture. 2014;24(1):49-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Anne-Le Morville
Lena-Karin Erlandsson
Mona Eklund
Bente Danneskiold-Samsøe
Robin Christensen
Kirstine Amris
Source
Torture. 2014;24(1):49-64
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adult
Afghanistan - ethnology
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression - diagnosis - ethnology - etiology - psychology
Disability Evaluation
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Iran - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Pain - diagnosis - ethnology - etiology - psychology
Pain Measurement
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Refugees - psychology
Self Report
Syria - ethnology
Torture - psychology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of Activities of Daily Living (ADL) ability impairment in newly arrived Danish asylum seekers. It was hypothesized that exposure to trauma and torture would negatively influence ADL performance and that measures of ADL ability would be lower in individuals exposed to torture as compared to the non-tortured.
Forty-three newly arrived asylum seekers aged 20-50 years, from Iran, Afghanistan and Syria, were consecutively included in the study.
ADL ability was assessed with the observation-based test Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS). Interviews were based on questionnaires about torture exposure, WHO-5 Wellbeing Index, Major Depression Inventory and Pain Detect Questionnaire. All participants were interviewed and tested using a linguistic interpreter.
Thirty three (77%) participants reported exposure to torture. The tortured did not differ significantly from the nontortured on measures of ADL ability (two-sample t-tests: Motor, p= 0.36; Process, p= 0.82). ADL performance impairment was observed in the overall study sample. Twelve had motor and 15 process ability measures below age norms and 2 below both AMPS motor and process cut-offs for effortless and efficient ADL performance. There were statistically significant - weak to moderate - correlations between self-reported psychological distress, VAS average pain, pain distribution and the AMPS measures.
The study results supported significant ADL ability impairment in tortured as well as non-tortured newly arrived asylum seekers. Implementation of performance-based evaluation of ADL ability as part of the initial medical screening of this particular population should be considered.
PubMed ID
25590464 View in PubMed
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Acute-Phase Fatigue Predicts Limitations with Activities of Daily Living 18 Months after First-Ever Stroke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283199
Source
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis. 2017 Mar;26(3):523-531
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Anners Lerdal
Caryl L Gay
Source
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis. 2017 Mar;26(3):523-531
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Fatigue - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Statistics as Topic
Stroke - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Stroke rehabilitation
Abstract
Fatigue during the acute phase following stroke has been shown to predict long-term physical health, specifically increased bodily pain and poorer self-rated general health. The aim of this analysis was to determine whether acute-phase fatigue also predicts patients' limitations in activities of daily living (ADL) 18 months after the first stroke.
Patients with first-ever stroke (N?=?88) were recruited upon admission at 2 hospitals in Norway. Patients were assessed within 2 weeks following admission and at 18 months using the Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living (BI), Fatigue Severity Scale, and Beck Depression Inventory II. The relationship between acute-phase fatigue and later activity limitations (BI?
PubMed ID
28040378 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and validation of the Cambridge pulmonary hypertension outcome review for Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119278
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Dec;40(8):777-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Nedim Selimovic
Bengt Rundqvist
Ewa Kjörk
Johan Viriden
James Twiss
Stephen P McKenna
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. nedim.selimovic@vgregion.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Dec;40(8):777-83
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adult
Aged
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Female
Humans
Hypertension, Pulmonary - physiopathology - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Psychometrics
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Translating
Young Adult
Abstract
The Cambridge pulmonary hypertension outcome review (CAMPHOR) is the first pulmonary hypertension-specific instrument for the assessment of the patient's perceived symptoms, activity limitations and quality of life (QoL).
To produce and validate a Swedish language version of the CAMPHOR.
Bilingual (n = 5) and lay panels (n = 5) were conducted to translate the CAMPHOR into Swedish. This new questionnaire was then field-tested with 14 patients and finally, it underwent psychometric evaluation by means of a postal validation study involving 38 patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH).
Few problems were experienced in translating the CAMPHOR into Swedish. The field-test participants found the scales relevant, comprehensible and easy to complete. Psychometric analyses showed that the Swedish adaptation was successful. The Swedish CAMPHOR scales had good internal consistency. Cronbach's alpha coefficients were 0.92 for the symptoms scale, 0.92 for activity limitations and 0.95 for the quality of life. Predicted correlations with the Nottingham Health Profile provided evidence of the construct validity of the scales. The Swedish scales also indicated known groups validity.
The Swedish version of the CAMPHOR is a reliable and valid measure of the impact of pulmonary hypertension on the lives of affected patients. It is recommended for use in clinical studies and routine practice in pulmonary hypertension patients.
PubMed ID
23117210 View in PubMed
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Analyzing participant produced photographs from an ethnographic study of fatherhood and smoking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159100
Source
Res Nurs Health. 2008 Oct;31(5):529-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
J L Oliffe
J L Bottorff
M. Kelly
M. Halpin
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Res Nurs Health. 2008 Oct;31(5):529-39
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adult
Anthropology, Cultural
Attitude to Health
British Columbia
Data Collection - methods
Fathers - psychology
Freedom
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Knowledge
Male
Narration
Nursing Methodology Research
Paternal Behavior
Philosophy, Nursing
Photography - methods
Postmodernism
Power (Psychology)
Psychological Theory
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Research Design
Smoking - psychology
Software
Abstract
As part of an ongoing ethnographic study, we examined the photographs and narratives that new fathers produced to ascertain how they created social, psychological, and relational space for continued smoking. A four-part process for analyzing the photographs consisting of preview, review, cross-photo comparison, and theorizing revealed how visual data analyses can be used to develop insights into men's health behaviors and beliefs. There is ongoing epistemological debate and methodological uncertainty about how photographic data should be treated in health sciences research. By conducting formal layered analyses, researchers can expand and extend both what is said about, and interpreted through, photographs.
PubMed ID
18228606 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of low back-pain-related content in Canadian newspaper media.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157684
Source
J Spinal Disord Tech. 2008 Feb;21(1):1-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Douglas P Gross
Jasmine Field
Kurt Shanski
Robert Ferrari
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada. dgross@ualberta.ca
Source
J Spinal Disord Tech. 2008 Feb;21(1):1-3
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Attitude to Health
Bed Rest
Canada
Culture
Exercise
Exercise Therapy
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Low Back Pain - psychology - therapy
Mass Media - statistics & numerical data - trends
Newspapers - statistics & numerical data - trends
Patient Education as Topic
Rest - psychology
Abstract
Review of newspaper articles.
To assess the content of newspaper articles in 2 provinces in Canada to determine if rest or avoidance of activity is being recommended for back pain.
Inaccurate back pain beliefs in the general public may arise due to messages in the mass media. One persisting belief in Canada is that rest or activity avoidance is needed until back pain resolves.
We searched newspapers in 2 Canadian provinces via an electronic database for articles discussing back pain. Two trained raters used an article review template to indicate whether the article's main recommendation was to stay active, rest, was neutral (indicating a balance between rest and activity), or did not provide advice on level of activity during an episode of back pain.
One hundred 29 articles were identified. The primary advice provided related to level of activity during an episode of back pain was stay active in 24% of articles, whereas no articles primarily recommended rest or avoidance of activity. Sixteen percent of articles were rated as neutral, indicating the authors suggested a balance between rest and activity.
Back-pain-related newspaper articles do not carry messages that advocate rest or avoidance of activity, but rather highlight the importance of staying active during an episode or participating in exercise.
PubMed ID
18418128 View in PubMed
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393 records – page 1 of 40.