Skip header and navigation

Refine By

127 records – page 1 of 13.

Accelerometer-determined physical activity and self-reported health in a population of older adults (65-85 years): a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264724
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:284
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Hilde Lohne-Seiler
Bjorge H Hansen
Elin Kolle
Sigmund A Anderssen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:284
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry - statistics & numerical data
Activities of Daily Living - classification
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Personal Satisfaction
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Registries
Regression Analysis
Sedentary lifestyle
Self Report
Abstract
The link between physical activity (PA) and prevention of disease, maintenance of independence, and improved quality of life in older adults is supported by strong evidence. However, there is a lack of data on population levels in this regard, where PA level has been measured objectively. The main aims were therefore to assess the level of accelerometer-determined PA and to examine its associations with self-reported health in a population of Norwegian older adults (65-85 years).
This was a part of a national multicenter study. Participants for the initial study were randomly selected from the national population registry, and the current study included those of the initial sample aged 65-85 years. The ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer was used to measure PA for seven consecutive days. A questionnaire was used to register self-reported health. Univariate analysis of variance with Bonferroni adjustments were used for comparisons between multiple groups.
A total of 560 participants had valid activity registrations. Mean age (SD) was 71.8 (5.6) years for women (n=282) and 71.7 (5.2) years for men (n=278). Overall PA level (cpm) differed considerably between the age groups where the oldest (80-85 y) displayed a 50% lower activity level compared to the youngest (65-70 y). No sex differences were observed in overall PA within each age group. Significantly more men spent time being sedentary (65-69 and 70-74 years) and achieved more minutes of moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) (75-79 years) compared to women. Significantly more women (except for the oldest), spent more minutes of low-intensity PA compared to men. PA differed across levels of self-reported health and a 51% higher overall PA level was registered in those, with "very good health" compared to those with "poor/very poor health".
Norwegian older adults PA levels differed by age. Overall, the elderly spent 66% of their time being sedentary and only 3% in MVPA. Twenty one percent of the participants fulfilled the current Norwegian PA recommendations. Overall PA levels were associated with self-reported health.
Notes
Cites: Scand J Soc Med. 1996 Sep;24(3):218-248878376
Cites: Age Ageing. 2013 Mar;42(2):222-923117467
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 1998 Nov;15(4):316-339838975
Cites: Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2005 Apr;12(2):102-1415785295
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 Nov;37(11 Suppl):S512-2216294114
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 Nov;37(11 Suppl):S531-4316294116
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2006 Mar;15(2):191-20116468076
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2007 Jun;30(6):1384-917473059
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2007 Sep;39(9):1502-817805081
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2008 Jan;40(1):181-818091006
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2008 Jan;40(1):59-6418091020
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2008 Apr 1;167(7):875-8118303006
Cites: Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2008 Jun;18(3):309-1717645730
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 2009 Jun;43(6):442-5018487253
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009 May;41(5):998-100519346988
Cites: Clin Geriatr Med. 2009 Nov;25(4):661-75, viii19944266
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2010 May 15;171(10):1055-6420406758
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2010 May 15;171(10):1065-820406761
Cites: Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2010 Feb;20(1):e41-719422647
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011 Apr;43(4):647-5420689449
Cites: Health Rep. 2011 Mar;22(1):7-1421510585
Cites: Prev Chronic Dis. 2012;9:E2622172193
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2012 Feb;44(2):266-7221796052
Cites: Res Q Exerc Sport. 2000 Jun;71(2 Suppl):S1-1410925819
Cites: WHO Reg Publ Eur Ser. 1996;58:i-xiii, 1-1618857196
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2000 Jul;32(7):1327-3810912901
Cites: Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2012 Feb;32(2):500-522075247
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2001 Jun;33(6 Suppl):S598-608; discussion S609-1011427784
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2001 Jul;33(7):1233-4011445774
Cites: J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2001 Oct;56 Spec No 2:36-4611730236
Cites: Physiol Meas. 2004 Apr;25(2):R1-2015132305
Cites: J Sports Sci. 2004 Aug;22(8):703-2515370483
Cites: J Gerontol. 1993 Jan;48(1):M10-48418139
Cites: Glob Health Action. 2012;5. doi: 10.3402/gha.v5i0.848822833712
Cites: Health Care Women Int. 1997 Mar-Apr;18(2):165-749119792
PubMed ID
24673834 View in PubMed
Less detail

ADCS Prevention Instrument Project: quality of life assessment (QOL).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79595
Source
Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2006 Oct-Dec;20(4 Suppl 3):S179-90
Publication Type
Article
Author
Patterson Marian B
Whitehouse Peter J
Edland Steven D
Sami Susie A
Sano Mary
Smyth Kathleen
Weiner Myron F
Author Affiliation
Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA. marian.patterson@case.edu
Source
Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2006 Oct-Dec;20(4 Suppl 3):S179-90
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - classification - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - prevention & control - psychology
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Status Schedule - statistics & numerical data
Postal Service
Primary Prevention
Proxy
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Self Assessment (Psychology)
United States
Abstract
Information about quality of life (QOL) is valuable in evaluating pharmaceutical agents but it is not adequately assessed in many dementia drug trials. In prevention trials, following participants to conversion to AD requires QOL scales appropriate for both normal and cognitively impaired individuals. Our objective was to evaluate the utility of several scales for subject or informant QOL assessment: Quality of Life-AD; Quality of Life Activity Inventory; SF-36; SF-12 (a shortened version of the SF-36); and Satisfaction with Life Scale. Measurements were collected from 644 subject-study partner pairs, half of whom completed the instruments at the clinic and half at home. Three-month test-retest data were collected. Scales administered at home or in clinic did not differ significantly. Subject self-ratings showed a wide range for all scales. Test-retest intraclass coefficients ranged from 0.67 to 0.77. Moderately high interscale associations suggest that the scales are measuring common aspects of QOL but are not equivalent. Furthermore, they differed with respect to associations with demographic variables and QOL determinants. We conclude that the QOL scores at baseline show sufficient range and reliability to suggest they will have utility in tracking QOL through conversion to dementia.
PubMed ID
17135811 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age, adaptive behavior, and Alzheimer disease in Down syndrome: cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217485
Source
Am J Ment Retard. 1994 Sep;99(2):151-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
D E Rasmussen
D. Sobsey
Author Affiliation
Alberta Family and Social Services, Red Deer, Alberta.
Source
Am J Ment Retard. 1994 Sep;99(2):151-65
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - classification - psychology
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Down Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Institutionalization
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Abstract
Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses were used to compare age-related changes in adaptive functioning in institutionalized adults with and without Down syndrome. Cross-sectional analysis showed significant differences related to level of functioning but not to age or etiology of disability. Longitudinal analysis showed a pattern of decline in self-help and communication skills in several individuals with Down syndrome older than 40. The case of an adult with Down syndrome with confirmed Alzheimer pathology at postmortem was presented. Results were discussed in relation to aging and the likelihood of Alzheimer-like changes in individuals with Down syndrome.
PubMed ID
7803032 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age-related health risk behaviors of adolescents with physical disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180059
Source
Soz Praventivmed. 2004;49(2):132-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Catherine A Steele
Ilze V Kalnins
Beth E Rossen
Douglas W Biggar
Joseph A Bortolussi
Jeffrey W Jutai
Author Affiliation
Bloorview MacMillan Centre, Toronto.
Source
Soz Praventivmed. 2004;49(2):132-41
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - classification
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Child
Disabled Children - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Female
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Humans
Likelihood Functions
Male
Ontario
Risk-Taking
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
To investigate age-related differences in health risk behaviors in 11-12-, 13-14-, and 15-16-year-old adolescents with physical disabilities.
Health survey data from 319 adolescents with physical disabilities were compared with the same data from 7,020 adolescents in a national sample.
Significant age-related differences were found for having tried smoking, smoking, having tasted an alcoholic drink, having been drunk, and using prescription drugs for recreational purposes. However, changes were modest and engagement of 15-16-year-old adolescents with physical disabilities was similar to 11-12-year-olds in the general population. Analysis of associations between disability status and health risk behaviors while controlling for age and sex showed that disability is associated with a lower likelihood of having tried smoking, smoking, having tasted an alcoholic drink, drinking, having been drunk, having used drugs, having used prescription drugs for recreational purposes, and eating sweets; a higher likelihood of not engaging in physical exercise, not eating fresh produce, and eating high-fat foods; and non-significant for seat-belt use.
Health promotion programs about health risk behaviours designed for adolescents in the general population may not be appropriate for adolescents with physical disabilities.
PubMed ID
15150865 View in PubMed
Less detail

An 18-month prospective cohort study of functional outcome of delirium in elderly patients: activities of daily living.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169572
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2006 Dec;18(4):681-700
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Stephen Vida
Guillaume Galbaud du Fort
Ritsuko Kakuma
Louise Arsenault
Robert W Platt
Christina M Wolfson
Author Affiliation
Division of Geriatric Psychiatry, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Canada. stephen.vida@muhc.mcgill.ca
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2006 Dec;18(4):681-700
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - classification - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - psychology
Cohort Studies
Delirium - diagnosis - psychology
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - psychology
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Parkinson Disease - diagnosis - psychology
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Quebec
Sex Factors
Stroke - diagnosis - psychology
Abstract
To examine delirium, chronic medical problems and sociodemographic factors as predictors of activities of daily living (ADL), basic ADL (BADL) and instrumental ADL (IADL).
A prospective cohort study of four groups of elderly patients examined in the emergency department (ED): those with delirium, dementia, neither, and both. All were aged 66 years or older and living at home. Delirium was assessed with the Confusion Assessment Method and dementia with the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly. Demographic variables and chronic medical problems were ascertained with questionnaires. Outcome was ADL at 6, 12 and 18 months, measured with the ADL subscale of the Older Americans Resources and Services instrument.
Univariate analyses suggested significantly poorer ADL, particularly IADL, at 18 months in the delirium versus the non-delirium group, in the absence of dementia only. Statistically significant independent predictors of poorer ADL at 18 months in the non-dementia groups were poorer initial ADL, stroke, Parkinson's disease, hypertension and female sex. Independent predictors of poorer BADL at 18 months in the non-dementia groups were poorer initial BADL, Parkinson's disease, stroke, cancer, colds/sinusitis/laryngitis, female sex and hypertension. Independent predictors of poorer IADL at 18 months in the non-dementia groups were poorer initial IADL, stroke, never-married status, colds/sinusitis/laryngitis, arthritis and hypertension, with Parkinson's disease showing a non-significant but numerically large regression coefficient.
Rather than finding delirium to be a predictor of poorer functional outcome among survivors, we found an interaction between delirium and dementia and several plausible confounders, primarily chronic medical problems, although we cannot rule out the effect of misclassification or survivor bias.
PubMed ID
16640797 View in PubMed
Less detail

An experimental test of a theoretical foundation for rating-scale valuations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14259
Source
Med Decis Making. 1997 Apr-Jun;17(2):208-16
Publication Type
Article
Author
H. Bleichrodt
M. Johannesson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy and Management, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. bleichrodt@econ.bmg.eur.nl
Source
Med Decis Making. 1997 Apr-Jun;17(2):208-16
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - classification
Adult
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - diagnosis
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Decision Support Techniques
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Netherlands
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Abstract
A major advantage of using a rating scale in health-utility measurement is its practical applicability: the method is relatively easy to understand, and various health states can be assessed simultaneously. However, a theoretical foundation for rating-scale valuations has not been established. The primary aim of this paper is to present a theoretical foundation for rating-scale valuations based on the theory of measurable value functions and to provide a consistency test to see whether rating-scale valuations do indeed elicit a measurable value function. If rating-scale valuations elicit a measurable value function, then Dyer and Sarin have shown how they are related to von Neumann-Morgensterm (vNM) utilities. The appropriate technique to measure vNM utilities is the standard gamble. Torrance has suggested that rating-scale valuations and standard-gamble valuations are related by a power function. A secondary aim of this paper is to examine the relationship between rating-scale valuations and standard-gamble valuations hypothesized by Torrance. An experiment was designed to test consistency of rating-scale valuations and the relationship between rating-scale valuations and standard-gamble valuations. The experiment tested whether rating-scale valuations are independent of the context in which they are elicited, as they should be if they elicit points on a measurable value function. 80 Swedish and 92 Dutch respondents participated in the experiment. The results showed that rating-scale valuations depend on the number of preferred alternatives in the task and thus violate a basic property of measurable value functions. The estimation of the power function did not result in stable results: parameter estimates varied, in some cases there was indication of misspecification, and in most cases there was indication of heteroskedastic errors. The implications of these findings for the common use of rating-scale valuations in cost-utility analysis are serious: the dependency of the rating-scale valuations on the other health states included in the task casts serious doubts on the validity of the rating-scale method.
Notes
Comment In: Med Decis Making. 1998 Apr-Jun;18(2):2369566457
PubMed ID
9107617 View in PubMed
Less detail

Application of a case-mix classification based on the functional autonomy of the residents for funding long-term care facilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186950
Source
Age Ageing. 2003 Jan;32(1):60-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Michel Tousignant
Réjean Hébert
Nicole Dubuc
France Simoneau
Linda Dieleman
Author Affiliation
Research Center on Aging, Sherbrooke Geriatric University Institute, Quebec, Canada. michel.tousignant@usherbrooke.ca
Source
Age Ageing. 2003 Jan;32(1):60-6
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - classification
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Budgets - statistics & numerical data
Chronic Disease - classification - economics
Diagnosis-Related Groups - classification - economics
Female
Financing, Government - economics
Health Policy - economics
Health Services Needs and Demand - economics
Homes for the Aged - economics
Humans
Long-Term Care - economics
Male
National Health Programs - economics
Quebec
Abstract
increasing public costs for the care of the elderly have created fundamental changes that are redefining the basic principles of health care funding. In the past, overall institutional funding was predominantly tied to spending. In view of the limitations of this approach to funding long-term care facilities, case-mix classification tries to take into account the characteristics of the residents as a tool for predicting costs. Recently, a new case-mix classification based on the functional autonomy profile of the residents - ISO-SMAF profile - was developed in the Province of Quebec, Canada. This classification can be used to change the funding system to base it on the functional autonomy characteristics of the residents.
the main objective of this study was to apply the ISO-SMAF classification to funding long-term care facilities in one area of the Province of Quebec and to compare the results of this new funding methodology to the formal methodology.
this study used a cross-sectional design.
the population under study comprised all residents of all 11 long-term care facilities in the Eastern Townships area of Quebec. Each resident was assessed using the Functional Autonomy Measurement System. The theoretical budget was calculated based on the adjusted cost per year associated with each ISO-SMAF profile derived from a previous economic study.
the theoretical budget based on the ISO-SMAF profiles may highlight the under- or over-funding of a facility when compared to the usual funding system based predominantly on the number of beds and hours of care.
the results of this study show the feasibility of applying the new funding approach to long-term care facilities. However, implementation of the ISO-SMAF classification for funding must be supported by continued and computerised residents' medical files including the Functional Autonomy Measurement System.
PubMed ID
12540350 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of health-related quality of life in arthritis: conceptualization and development of five item banks using item response theory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169016
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2006;4:33
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Jacek A Kopec
Eric C Sayre
Aileen M Davis
Elizabeth M Badley
Michal Abrahamowicz
Lesley Sherlock
J Ivan Williams
Aslam H Anis
John M Esdaile
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. jkopec@arthritisresearch.ca
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2006;4:33
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - classification
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Arthritis - physiopathology - psychology
Arthroplasty, Replacement
British Columbia
Chi-Square Distribution
Databases, Factual
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Rheumatology
Sickness Impact Profile
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Modern psychometric methods based on item response theory (IRT) can be used to develop adaptive measures of health-related quality of life (HRQL). Adaptive assessment requires an item bank for each domain of HRQL. The purpose of this study was to develop item banks for five domains of HRQL relevant to arthritis.
About 1,400 items were drawn from published questionnaires or developed from focus groups and individual interviews and classified into 19 domains of HRQL. We selected the following 5 domains relevant to arthritis and related conditions: Daily Activities, Walking, Handling Objects, Pain or Discomfort, and Feelings. Based on conceptual criteria and pilot testing, 219 items were selected for further testing. A questionnaire was mailed to patients from two hospital-based clinics and a stratified random community sample. Dimensionality of the domains was assessed through factor analysis. Items were analyzed with the Generalized Partial Credit Model as implemented in Parscale. We used graphical methods and a chi-square test to assess item fit. Differential item functioning was investigated using logistic regression.
Data were obtained from 888 individuals with arthritis. The five domains were sufficiently unidimensional for an IRT-based analysis. Thirty-one items were deleted due to lack of fit or differential item functioning. Daily Activities had the narrowest range for the item location parameter (-2.24 to 0.55) and Handling Objects had the widest range (-1.70 to 2.27). The mean (median) slope parameter for the items ranged from 1.15 (1.07) in Feelings to 1.73 (1.75) in Walking. The final item banks are comprised of 31-45 items each.
We have developed IRT-based item banks to measure HRQL in 5 domains relevant to arthritis. The items in the final item banks provide adequate psychometric information for a wide range of functional levels in each domain.
Notes
Cites: Med Care. 2000 Sep;38(9 Suppl):II28-4210982088
Cites: J Appl Meas. 2006;7(1):1-1516385148
Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2003 Jun 3-17;25(11-12):565-7112959329
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2003 Dec;12(8):913-3314651412
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2003 Dec;12(8):935-5214651413
Cites: Stat Med. 2004 Jan 30;23(2):241-5614716726
Cites: Psychol Med. 1979 Feb;9(1):139-45424481
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1980 Feb;23(2):137-457362664
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1980 Feb;23(2):146-527362665
Cites: Physiotherapy. 1980 Aug;66(8):271-36450426
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1980 Dec;34(4):281-67241028
Cites: Med Care. 1981 Aug;19(8):787-8057278416
Cites: J Rheumatol. 1982 Sep-Oct;9(5):780-46757424
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1983 Jun;67(6):361-706880820
Cites: J Clin Oncol. 1984 May;2(5):472-836374052
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1987 Jul;68(7):438-413606368
Cites: J Rheumatol. 1987 Jun;14(3):446-513305931
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1988 Jun;31(6):714-203382446
Cites: J Rheumatol. 1988 Dec;15(12):1833-403068365
Cites: Oncology (Williston Park). 1990 May;4(5):135-8;discussion 1472143399
Cites: Med Care. 1990 Dec;28(12 Suppl):DS1-772246942
Cites: Br J Cancer. 1990 Dec;62(6):1034-82257209
Cites: Health Policy. 1990 Dec;16(3):199-20810109801
Cites: Med Care. 1992 Jun;30(6):473-831593914
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1993 Mar 3;85(5):365-768433390
Cites: J Clin Oncol. 1993 Mar;11(3):570-98445433
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 1994 Apr;9(3):186-928014530
Cites: Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1994 Sep 1;19(17):1887-967997920
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1994 Dec;47(12):1423-357730851
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 1995;16:327-547639876
Cites: J Orthop Res. 1996 Mar;14(2):173-818648493
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1996 Jun;29(6):602-88773720
Cites: Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1996 Mar 15;21(6):741-98882698
Cites: Br J Rheumatol. 1997 Aug;36(8):878-839291857
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1997 Oct 15;127(8 Pt 2):743-509382391
Cites: Behav Res Ther. 1998 Jul-Aug;36(7-8):777-889682533
Cites: J Hand Surg Am. 1998 Jul;23(4):575-879708370
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1999 Oct;42(10):2220-3010524697
Cites: Psychol Bull. 1959 Jan;56(1):26-4713623958
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1961 Jun;4:561-7113688369
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1965 Jan;12:63-7014221692
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2005 Feb;58(2):190-715680754
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 2005 Sep;30(3):278-8816183012
Cites: Clin Exp Rheumatol. 2005 Sep-Oct;23(5 Suppl 39):S53-716273785
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2005 Dec;14(10):2277-9116328907
Cites: Ann Med. 2001 Jul;33(5):375-8411491197
PubMed ID
16749932 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of service needs of adult psychiatric inpatients: a systematic approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208950
Source
Psychiatr Q. 1997;68(1):5-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
S S Kazarian
S B McCabe
L W Joseph
Author Affiliation
London Psychiatric Hospital, ON, Canada.
Source
Psychiatr Q. 1997;68(1):5-23
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - classification
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Community Mental Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Hospitals, Public
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Ontario
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In this study, a systematic needs-assessment approach to evaluating the institutional and community service requirements of adult psychiatric inpatients is reported. The Community Placement Questionnaire (CPQ) was completed by professional staff on all patients between the ages of 18-65 residing in a publicly-funded psychiatric hospital. Of the 105 patients surveyed, 65.7% were considered potentially hard to place in the community (6.7% were nominated for permanent placement in the institution), and 34.3% were considered easy to place. The findings indicate that successful planning for community-based mental health services requires the four essential elements of the protected hospital environment, treatment, augmentation in psychosocial rehabilitation programming and availability of supports and services in the community. Specific strategies for transition from institutional-based care to community care are discussed.
PubMed ID
9021838 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attention, frailty, and falls: the effect of a manual task on basic mobility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46336
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 1998 Jun;46(6):758-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
L. Lundin-Olsson
L. Nyberg
Y. Gustafson
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 1998 Jun;46(6):758-61
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Activities of Daily Living - classification
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attention
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Male
Mental Status Schedule
Motor Skills
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of a second task on balance and gait maneuvers used in everyday life. Our hypothesis was that those who were more distracted by a familiar manual task performed concurrently with functional maneuvers were more frail and more prone to falls. DESIGN: A cross-sectional design with prospective follow-up for falls. SETTING: Sheltered accommodation in Umeå, Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: Forty-two residents (30 women, 12 men; mean age +/- SD = 79.7 +/- 6.1 years), ambulant with or without a walking aid, able to follow simple instructions and able to carry a tumbler. MEASUREMENTS: Timed Up & Go (TUG), i.e., the time taken to rise from an armchair, walk 3 meters, turn round, and sit down again. TUG was repeated with an added manual task (TUGmanual), which was to carry a glass of water while walking. The Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, Barthel Index, Functional Reach, Mini-Mental State Examination, and Line Bisection test were used to assess for frailty. The subjects were followed-up prospectively regarding falls indoors for a period of 6-months. RESULTS: Subjects with a time difference (diffTUG) between TUGmanual and TUG of > or = 4.5 seconds were considered to be distracted by the second task. Ten subjects had a difference in time of > or = 4.5 seconds. These subjects were more frail, and seven of them fell indoors during the follow-up period (odds ratio 4.7, 95%Confidence Interval (CI) 1.5-14.2). CONCLUSION: The time difference between the TUGmanual and the TUG appears to be a valid marker of frailty and a useful tool for identifying older persons prone to falling.
PubMed ID
9625194 View in PubMed
Less detail

127 records – page 1 of 13.