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2883 records – page 1 of 289.

A 6-year follow-up study of 122 patients attending a multiprofessional rehabilitation programme for persistent musculoskeletal-related pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78830
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 2007 Mar;30(1):9-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Norrefalk Jan-Rickard
Linder Jürgen
Ekholm Jan
Borg Kristian
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Rehabilitation Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. norrefalk@hotmail.com
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 2007 Mar;30(1):9-18
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Age Factors
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Case-Control Studies
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - rehabilitation
Pain - rehabilitation
Pain Measurement
Sick Leave
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of the study was to evaluate the outcome 6 years after completing a multiprofessional 8-week rehabilitation programme regarding the following objectives: (1) return to work, (2) level of activity and (3) pain intensity. Of 149 patients attending a rehabilitation programme, 122 were followed up after 6 years, through a structured telephone interview, and their present work situation, level of activity, sleeping habits, their estimated pain intensity and consumption of analgesics were recorded. The questions presented were the same as they had answered before entering the programme. The return-to-work rate was compared to 79 patients in a control group. At the 6-year follow-up, compared to before entering the programme, 52% had returned to work (P
PubMed ID
17293715 View in PubMed
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A 7-day activity diary for assessment of daily energy expenditure validated by the doubly labelled water method in adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52682
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1997 Sep;51(9):585-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
L E Bratteby
B. Sandhagen
H. Fan
G. Samuelson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1997 Sep;51(9):585-91
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adolescent
Basal Metabolism
Calorimetry, Indirect
Comparative Study
Deuterium - diagnostic use
Energy Metabolism
Exertion
Female
Humans
Male
Oxygen Isotopes
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden
Water
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To validate the use of an activity diary and predicted BMR for assessment of daily total energy expenditure (TEE) and physical activity level (PAL = TEE/BMR) in adolescents. DESIGN: TEE and PAL estimated from activity diary records kept for seven days and BMR predicted from age, gender and body weight were compared with the results of doubly labelled water (DLW) measurements and indirect calorimetry performed during the same time period. SETTING: The Unit of paediatric Physiology of the Department of Clinical Physiology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. SUBJECTS: Fifty randomly selected 15 y old adolescents (25 boys and 25 girls). RESULTS: The mean difference between TEE estimated in all adolescents by the activity diary and by DLW methods was 1.2%. The limits of agreement (mean difference 2 s.d.) were -3.47 and 3.77 MD/d, equivalent to a coefficient of variation of 15%. The mean difference between PAL assessed by activity diary records and by DLW measurements was 0.001, and the limits of agreement between the two methods were 0.54. CONCLUSIONS: The results imply that the activity diary method provides a close estimate of TEE and PAL in population groups.
PubMed ID
9306084 View in PubMed
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A 10-year follow-up study on subjective well-being and relationships to person-environment (P-E) fit and activity of daily living (ADL) dependence of older Swedish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154920
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2009 Jul-Aug;49(1):e16-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
Monica Werngren-Elgström
Gunilla Carlsson
Susanne Iwarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Box 157, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden.
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2009 Jul-Aug;49(1):e16-22
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Environment
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
In order to investigate how well-being and ill health is affected by the process of aging, the main aim was to investigate these self-perceived aspects of health over a 10-year period among older Swedish adults. The aim was also to study how these aspects correlated with objectively assessed functional limitations, use of mobility device, person-environment (P-E) fit (also denoted accessibility), problems in housing, and activity of daily living (ADL) dependence. Using the Swedish national population register, a baseline sample of persons aged 75-84 years was identified. Out of the 133 participants at baseline (1994), the 31 participants still available 10 years later were included. The data were collected by means of interview and observation at home visits. Overall, the participants rated their subjective well-being as high and a stable prevalence of ill-health symptoms over time was reported. Changes in subjective well-being as related to changes in functional aspects seem to mainly occur earlier in the aging process, while as time goes by these relations weaken. ADL dependence, however, is more influential in more advanced age. The results confirm the complexity of the construct of health. A main contribution is that the results shed light on the importance of taking the impact of environmental factors into consideration.
PubMed ID
18829123 View in PubMed
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A 12-year follow-up of subjects initially sicklisted with neck/shoulder or low back diagnoses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71946
Source
Physiother Res Int. 2001;6(1):52-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
G. Kjellman
B. Oberg
G. Hensing
K. Alexanderson
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
Physiother Res Int. 2001;6(1):52-63
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Attitude to Health
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Employment
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Low Back Pain - physiopathology
Male
Neck Pain - physiopathology
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Shoulder Pain - physiopathology
Sick Leave
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Neck/shoulder and low back pain are common in the Western world and can cause great personal and economic consequences, but so far there are few long term follow-up studies of the consequences of back pain, especially studies that separate the location of back pain. More knowledge is needed about different patterns of risk factors and prognoses for neck/shoulder and low back pain, respectively, and they should not be treated as similar conditions. The aim of the present study was to investigate possible long-term differences in neck/shoulder and low back symptoms, experienced over a 12-year period, with regard to work status, present health, discomfort and influence on daily activities. METHOD: A retrospective cohort study of individuals sicklisted with neck/shoulder or low back diagnoses 12 years ago was undertaken. Included were all 213 people who, in 1985, lived in the municipality of Linköping, Sweden, were aged 25-34 years and who had taken at least one new period of sickleave lasting > 28 days with a neck/shoulder or low back diagnosis. In 1996, a questionnaire was mailed to the 204 people who were still resident in Sweden (response rate 73%). RESULTS: Those initially absent with neck/shoulder diagnoses rated their present state of discomfort as worse than those sicklisted with low back diagnoses. Only 4% of the neck/shoulder group reported no present discomfort compared with 25% of the low back group. Notably, both groups reported the same duration of low back discomfort during the last year, which may indicate a higher risk for symptoms in more than one location for subjects with neck/shoulder problems. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with sickness absence of more than 28 days with neck/shoulder or low back diagnoses appear to be at high risk of developing long-standing symptoms significantly more so for those initially having neck/shoulder diagnoses.
PubMed ID
11379256 View in PubMed
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15. Canadian experience with patient care classification.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251109
Source
Med Care. 1976 May;14(5 Suppl):134-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1976
Author
J A MacDonell
Source
Med Care. 1976 May;14(5 Suppl):134-7
Date
May-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Canada
Classification
Costs and Cost Analysis
Financing, Government
Humans
Insurance, Health
Long-Term Care
Nursing Care
Patient Care Planning
Social Adjustment
Abstract
Patient care classification in Canada in the past has been largely dictated by insurance coverage and the fiscal policies of the individual provinces. In recent years, however, the Canadian Department of Health and Welfare has been promoting the development of a standard patient care classification based on assessment of client or patient needs in regard to the category, type, and level of care. Experimentation with the proposed classification system in several provinces confirms the need in long-term care to include assessment of nursing requirements, physical functioning, and psychosocial assets and liabilities, and points to the importance of using such a classification for planning and evaluating patient care as well as for administrative purposes.
PubMed ID
819730 View in PubMed
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The 39 item Parkinson's disease questionnaire (PDQ-39) revisited: implications for evidence based medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164059
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2007 Nov;78(11):1191-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Peter Hagell
Carita Nygren
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, PO Box 157, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden. Peter.Hagell@med.lu.se
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2007 Nov;78(11):1191-8
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antiparkinson Agents - therapeutic use
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - psychology
Disability Evaluation
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Levodopa - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Parkinson Disease - diagnosis - drug therapy - psychology
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sick Role
Sweden
Abstract
The 39 item Parkinson's disease questionnaire (PDQ-39) is the most widely used patient reported rating scale in Parkinson's disease. However, several fundamental measurement assumptions necessary for confident use and interpretation of the eight PDQ-39 scales have not been fully addressed.
Postal survey PDQ-39 data from 202 people with Parkinson's disease (54% men; mean age 70 years) were analysed regarding psychometric properties using traditional and Rasch measurement methods.
Data quality was good (mean missing item responses, 2%) and there was general support for the legitimacy of summing items within scales without weighting or standardisation. Score reliabilities were adequate (Cronbach's alpha 0.72-0.95; test-retest 0.76-0.93). The validity of the current grouping of items into scales was not supported by scaling success rates (mean 56.2%), or factor and Rasch analyses. All scales represented more health problems than that experienced by the sample (mean floor effect 15%) and showed compromised score precision towards the less severe end.
Our results provide general support for the acceptability and reliability of the PDQ-39. However, they also demonstrate limitations that have implications for the use of the PDQ-39 in clinical research. The grouping of items into scales appears overly complex and the meaning of scale scores is unclear, which hampers their interpretation. Suboptimal targeting limits measurement precision and, therefore, probably also responsiveness. These observations have implications for the role of the PDQ-39 in clinical trials and evidence based medicine. PDQ-39 derived endpoints should be interpreted and selected cautiously, particularly regarding small but clinically important effects among people with less severe problems.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17442762 View in PubMed
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40 years after the first atrial switch procedure in patients with transposition of the great arteries: long-term results in Toronto and Zurich.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197150
Source
Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2000 Aug;48(4):233-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
E. Oechslin
R. Jenni
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, University Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland. erwin.oechslin@dim.usz.ch
Source
Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2000 Aug;48(4):233-7
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Actuarial Analysis
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Arrhythmias, Cardiac - etiology
Cause of Death
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology - etiology
Echocardiography
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - etiology - mortality
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Quality of Life
Reoperation - statistics & numerical data
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Analysis
Switzerland - epidemiology
Time Factors
Transposition of Great Vessels - complications - mortality - psychology - surgery
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Dysfunction, Right - etiology - mortality
Abstract
The atrial switch procedure dramatically improved the prognosis of children with complete transposition of the great arteries (TGA). Overall actuarial survival was approximately 75% after 25 years and was better in patients with simple TGA than in those with complex TGA. Mortality by any cause (16%) and cardiovascular mortality (12% and 13%) were comparable in both centers. Progressive congestive heart failure and sudden death were the principal modes of death. Most of the survivors denied any symptoms or had mild limitations in their daily activities. However, long-term problems in this growing population of adults are challenging and include late arrhythmias (up to two thirds of the patients), systemic ventricular (SV) failure, systemic atrioventricular valve regurgitation and reoperations, such as baffle reconstruction, being the most frequent. Objective assessment of SV function obtained by echocardiography is difficult. It may include fractional area change and tricuspid annular motion. Survivors after an atrial switch procedure are unique and have a good quality of life. However, the definitive and true history of the RV supporting the systemic circulation is not as yet known.
PubMed ID
11005599 View in PubMed
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Abilities and activities of patients with dementia in day hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227113
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1991;5(1):49-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
L. Borell
P O Sandman
B. Winblad
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1991;5(1):49-55
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Day Care - organization & administration - standards
Dementia - nursing - physiopathology
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Sweden
Abstract
The proportion of individuals with dementia is increasing in all kinds of institutions. Specialised day hospitals are now being developed as an alternative to long term care for the demented. Twelve day hospital wards, with 312 individuals suffering from dementia, were included in a study aiming to assess functional abilities and frequencies of participation in different activities. Eighty-nine per cent of the day hospital patients could be classified as having a dementia disease. Seventy-eight per cent of the population were dependent on some kind of help from a caregiver in the performance of ADL activities. The most common occupations that could be seen in the programmes were physical activities, entertainment, and personal care activities. The activities were often undertaken as large group activities, often including more than ten patients. The functional abilities that characterise the population are comparable with those of the population living in pensioners' service blocks with full board.
PubMed ID
2011673 View in PubMed
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Ability for self-care among home dwelling elderly people in a health district in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72190
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2000 Aug;37(4):361-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
O. Söderhamn
C. Lindencrona
A. Ek
Author Affiliation
Vänersborg University College of Health Sciences, P.O. Box 236, SE-462 23, Vänersborg, Sweden.
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2000 Aug;37(4):361-8
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Care
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe the ability for self-care among home dwelling elderly in the community in a health district in western Sweden. Two self-report instruments plus a number of self-care related questions were distributed by mail to an age stratified random sample and finally completed by a total of 125 subjects. Bivariate and multivariate statistical methods were used in the analyses. The results showed that self-care ability and self-care agency decreased for respondents 75+ years of age. Self-care ability was predicted by three productive means for self-care and four risk factors.
PubMed ID
10760543 View in PubMed
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Ability to perform activities of daily living is the main factor affecting quality of life in patients with dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51955
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2004 Sep 21;2:52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-21-2004
Author
Christian K Andersen
Kim U Wittrup-Jensen
Anette Lolk
Kjeld Andersen
Per Kragh-Sørensen
Author Affiliation
MUUSMANN Research & Consulting, Haderslevvej 36, 6000 Kolding, Denmark. journals@noos.fr
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2004 Sep 21;2:52
Date
Sep-21-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - physiopathology - psychology
Caregivers
Cluster analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - classification - physiopathology - psychology
Denmark
Dependency (Psychology)
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Interviews
Male
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Quality of Life - psychology
Severity of Illness Index
Sickness Impact Profile
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Dementia is a chronic illness associated with a progressive loss of cognitive and intellectual abilities, such as memory, judgment and abstract thinking.The objective of this study was to assess the health utilities of patients with dementia in Europe and identify the key factors influencing their Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQol). METHODS: This study used cross-sectional data from the Odense study; a Danish cohort of patients aged 65-84 living in Odense, Denmark. A total of 244 patients with mild to severe dementia were interviewed together with a caregiver about their health status and activities of daily living (ADL). Alzheimer's disease was diagnosed according to the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria for probable dementia. Vascular dementia and other types of dementia were diagnosed according to the DSM-IIIR criteria. Severity of dementia was defined by score intervals on the Mini Mental State Examination score: mild (MMSE 20-30), moderate (MMSE 10-19), and severe (MMSE 0-9). Based on the ADL information, the patients' dependency level was defined as either dependent or independent. Questions from the Odense Study were mapped into each of the five dimensions of the EQ-5D in order to assess patients' HRQol. Danish EQ-5D social tariffs were used to value patients' HRQol.A regression analysis of EQ-5D values was conducted with backward selection on gender, age, severity, ADL level and setting in order to determine the main factor influencing HRQoL. RESULTS: The EQ-5D weight in patients independent upon others in ADL was 0.641 (95% CI: [0.612-0.669]), and in those dependent upon others was 0.343 (95% CI: [0.251-0.436]). CONCLUSION: Dependency upon others to perform ADL was the main factor affecting HRQoL.
PubMed ID
15383148 View in PubMed
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2883 records – page 1 of 289.