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17 records – page 1 of 2.

Acquired immune deficiency syndrome in Canada: the first 5 years of surveillance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232497
Source
CMAJ. 1988 Sep 1;139(5):383-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1988
Author
J. Losos
G. Wells
K. Elmslie
G. Verveniotis
A J Clayton
Author Affiliation
Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Department of National Health and Welfare, Tunney's Pasture, Ottawa, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1988 Sep 1;139(5):383-8
Date
Sep-1-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - mortality - transmission
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Child
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Risk factors
Abstract
In the first 5 years of surveillance of reports of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in Canada, from February 1982, the Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Ottawa, was notified of 1133 cases reported through provincial ministries of health that met the case definition developed by the US Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta. Most cases (82.2%) were reported from the homosexual/bisexual risk group. Other risk groups were less frequently represented, in contrast to the experience in the United States, where a higher proportion of cases in drug abusers has been observed, and in Africa, where heterosexual spread is far more common. The presenting clinical picture and length of survival after diagnosis were similar to those reported for other countries. Differences between projected estimates of the number of AIDS cases obtained with polynomial and logistic growth models emphasize the need for solid epidemiologic data on the number of people infected with human immunodeficiency virus, the rates of transmission and the rates of progression to disease.
Notes
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1983 Aug;148(2):339-456604115
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1984 Dec;73(6):1281-46334770
Cites: Lancet. 1986 Feb 22;1(8478):446-72868365
Cites: Nature. 1987 Mar 12-18;326(6109):137-423821890
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1986 Sep-Oct;101(5):459-653094074
Cites: Science. 1986 Nov 21;234(4779):955-633022379
Cites: JAMA. 1987 Mar 13;257(10):1367-743546745
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1986 Jun 28;292(6537):1727-93089373
PubMed ID
3409117 View in PubMed
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AIDS--dramatic surge in ex-Soviet Union, no respite worldwide, new data show.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195656
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 2001;79(1):78
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
R. Dobson
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 2001;79(1):78
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Europe, Eastern - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Russia - epidemiology
Notes
Comment In: Bull World Health Organ. 2001;79(3):26911285679
PubMed ID
11217673 View in PubMed
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The AIDS epidemic among Scandinavian women: 1980-1990.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7988
Source
AIDS. 1994 May;8(5):689-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1994
Author
E. Smith
V. Hasseltvedt
M. Böttiger
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Statens Seruminstitut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
AIDS. 1994 May;8(5):689-92
Date
May-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections - epidemiology
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood Transfusion - adverse effects
Female
HIV Infections - transmission
Humans
Life tables
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Sexual Behavior - statistics & numerical data
Sexual Partners
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe trends and patterns in the AIDS epidemic among Scandinavian women with AIDS. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: All women with AIDS reported to national surveillance units in Denmark, Norway and Sweden in 1980-1990 were included for analyses. RESULTS: The number of heterosexually infected female AIDS cases increased over time. AIDS-defining diseases varied with transmission categories, a variation similar to that found among heterosexual Danish male AIDS cases. Heterosexually infected women were more frequently diagnosed with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia than with oesophagus candidiasis compared with intravenous drug using women. Twenty-five out of 56 heterosexually infected women reported having a male partner who was bisexual or from a Pattern II country, while one in four did not recognize any risk in their sex partner(s). Survival time increased between 1980 and 1990 and did not differ from survival in male AIDS cases. In a proportional hazards model, age, year of diagnosis and the duration of known HIV-positivity before development of AIDS had an independent impact on survival. The number of women known to be HIV-positive for more than 1 year before diagnosis of AIDS increased over time, although the number of women tested for HIV close to the development of AIDS was especially high among heterosexually infected women. CONCLUSION: Increasing numbers of heterosexually infected women are being diagnosed with AIDS in Scandinavia.
PubMed ID
8060549 View in PubMed
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The AIDS epidemic in the city of Copenhagen, Denmark: potential years of life lost and impact on life expectancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7136
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2005;33(3):222-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Jeanne D Johansen
Else Smith
Knud Juel
Nils Rosdahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2005;33(3):222-7
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Adult
Cause of Death
Cities - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
AIMS: This study seeks to describe the impact of AIDS on the city of Copenhagen by estimating potential years of life lost (PYLL) before the age of 65 years and to estimate the impact of AIDS deaths on life expectancy for males and females. METHODS: All AIDS cases reported to the national AIDS surveillance register for residents in the city of Copenhagen in the period 1983-98 were included. For comparative purposes data were obtained on six other causes of death: accidents, suicide, lung cancer, ischaemic heart disease, testicular cancer, and breast cancer. RESULTS: Overall, deaths from AIDS accounted for 8% of all PYLL in men and showed an increasing tendency from 1983 to 1991, when it became the leading cause of PYLL. AIDS had most impact in men in the age group 25-44 years and accounted for 29% of all PYLL in this group at the peak in 1993, decreasing significantly after the introduction of anti-retroviral treatments to 5% of PYLL in 1998. Other leading causes of PYLL, accidents and suicide, also showed a decreasing tendency over the years, but of a much smaller magnitude than AIDS. The impact of AIDS in women was more modest. In the entire study period suicide, accidents, and breast cancer were the leading causes of PYLL in women. It was shown that AIDS deaths at the top of the epidemic in 1991-95 were responsible for a loss of 0.76 years in life expectancy for men and 0.08 years for women. CONCLUSIONS: AIDS has had a considerable impact on potential years of life lost. A significant decline in AIDS deaths has been seen since 1995 with an effect on life expectancy for men in the city of Copenhagen.
PubMed ID
16040464 View in PubMed
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Source
CMAJ. 1985 Nov 1;133(9):892
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-1985

AIDS survival: first drop in total deaths in U.S.; larger drop in France.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2997
Source
AIDS Treat News. 1997 Mar 7;(No 266):1, 6-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-7-1997
Author
J S James
Source
AIDS Treat News. 1997 Mar 7;(No 266):1, 6-7
Date
Mar-7-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - mortality
Female
France - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Sexual Behavior
Substance Abuse, Intravenous
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
In February 1997, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported a 12 percent decline in AIDS deaths over a 1-year period, the first drop in total deaths from AIDS in the United States. The decline was greatest in the West and Northeast, followed by the Midwest and South. By ethnicity, the drop was greatest among non-Hispanic whites and American Indians/Alaskan Natives. Deaths increased in women and persons infected heterosexually, but declined for men and other risk groups, such as men who have sex with men and injection drug users. France also reported a 25 percent reduction in AIDS deaths from 1995 to 1996, as well as a 21 percent decrease in diagnosed AIDS cases from the first to second half of 1996.
PubMed ID
11364245 View in PubMed
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[HIV infection and AIDS in 1988. The epidemiological situation in Norway]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8505
Source
Sykepleien. 1989 Feb 23;77(4):4-8, 21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-23-1989

17 records – page 1 of 2.