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AIDS could dominate Russian budget by 2020.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188655
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 2002;80(8):686-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002

AIDS meeting urged to rethink prevention strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167880
Source
Nature. 2006 Aug 17;442(7104):724-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-17-2006

Association between U.S. state AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP) features and HIV antiretroviral therapy initiation, 2001-2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106044
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(11):e78952
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
David B Hanna
Kate Buchacz
Kelly A Gebo
Nancy A Hessol
Michael A Horberg
Lisa P Jacobson
Gregory D Kirk
Mari M Kitahata
P Todd Korthuis
Richard D Moore
Sonia Napravnik
Pragna Patel
Michael J Silverberg
Timothy R Sterling
James H Willig
Ann Collier
Hasina Samji
Jennifer E Thorne
Keri N Althoff
Jeffrey N Martin
Benigno Rodriguez
Elizabeth A Stuart
Stephen J Gange
Author Affiliation
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America ; Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States of America.
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(11):e78952
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - drug therapy - economics
Anti-Retroviral Agents - administration & dosage - economics
Canada
Female
Government Programs
Healthcare Financing
Humans
Male
Retrospective Studies
United States
Abstract
U.S. state AIDS Drug Assistance Programs (ADAPs) are federally funded to provide antiretroviral therapy (ART) as the payer of last resort to eligible persons with HIV infection. States differ regarding their financial contributions to and ways of implementing these programs, and it remains unclear how this interstate variability affects HIV treatment outcomes.
We analyzed data from HIV-infected individuals who were clinically-eligible for ART between 2001 and 2009 (i.e., a first reported CD4+
Notes
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PubMed ID
24260137 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1991 Apr;68(3):6-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1991

Cost-effectiveness of combination therapy with etravirine in treatment-experienced adults with HIV-1 infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129591
Source
AIDS. 2012 Jan 28;26(3):355-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-28-2012
Author
Josephine Mauskopf
Anita J Brogan
Sandra E Talbird
Silas Martin
Author Affiliation
RTI Health Solutions, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA. jmauskopf@rti.org
Source
AIDS. 2012 Jan 28;26(3):355-64
Date
Jan-28-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - drug therapy - economics - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anti-HIV Agents - economics - therapeutic use
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Canada - epidemiology
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Double-Blind Method
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
HIV-1 - isolation & purification
Humans
Male
Markov Chains
Middle Aged
Models, Economic
Pyridazines - economics - therapeutic use
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Ritonavir - economics - therapeutic use
Sulfonamides - economics - therapeutic use
Viral Load - drug effects
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess the cost-effectiveness of etravirine (INTELENCE), a novel nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, used in combination with a background regimen that included darunavir/ritonavir, from a Canadian Provincial Ministry of Health perspective.
A Markov model with a 3-month cycle time and six health states based on CD4 cell count ranges was developed to follow a hypothetical cohort of treatment-experienced adults with HIV-1 infection through initial and subsequent treatment regimens.
Costs (in 2009 Canadian dollars), utilities, and HIV-related mortality data for each health state as well as non-HIV-related mortality data were estimated from Canadian sources and published literature. Transition probabilities between health states and first-year hospitalization and mortality rates were derived from clinical trial data. Incremental 1-year costs per additional adult with viral load less than 50 copies/ml at 48 weeks and incremental lifetime costs per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained were estimated using a 5% discount rate. Sensitivity and variability analyses and model validation were performed.
Etravirine was associated with an increased probability of achieving less than 50 copies/ml at 48 weeks of 0.205 and an estimated gain of 0.66 discounted (1.48 undiscounted) QALYs over a lifetime. The incremental 1-year cost per additional person with viral load less than 50 copies/ml was $23,862. The lifetime incremental cost per QALY gained was $49,120. For the uncertainty ranges and variability scenarios tested for the lifetime horizon, the cost-effectiveness ratio was between $28,859 and 66,249.
When compared with optimized standard of care including darunavir/ritonavir, adding etravirine represents a cost-effective option for treatment-experienced adults in Canada.
PubMed ID
22089378 View in PubMed
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The cost-effectiveness of highly active antiretroviral therapy, Canada 1991-2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176836
Source
AIDS. 2004 Dec 3;18(18):2411-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-3-2004
Author
Eduard J Beck
Sundhiya Mandalia
Maurice Gaudreault
Carl Brewer
Hanna Zowall
Norbert Gilmore
Marina B Klein
Richard Lalonde
Alain Piché
Catherine A Hankins
Author Affiliation
Departement de sante publique de Montréal-centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. becke@who.int
Source
AIDS. 2004 Dec 3;18(18):2411-8
Date
Dec-3-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - drug therapy - economics
Adult
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active - economics
Chi-Square Distribution
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Disease Progression
Drug Costs
Female
HIV Infections - drug therapy - economics
Humans
Male
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Quebec
Abstract
To estimate the cost-effectiveness ratio of highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in Canada.
A before-and-after analysis to calculate incremental cost of life year gained (LYG) between 1991 and 1995 (pre-HAART period) and between 1997 and 2001 (HAART period) for non-AIDS and AIDS groups (CDC stage of HIV infection).
For two Quebec HIV hospital clinics, mean inpatient (IP) days, outpatient (OP) visits and direct health care costs per patient-year (PPY) were calculated. Cox's proportional hazards models calculated disease progression, stratified by study periods and adjusted for gender, age at cohort entry, sexual orientation, injecting drug use and baseline CD4 cell count.
For non-AIDS patients, mean IP days was 1.6 (pre-HAART period) compared with 0.8 PPY (HAART period); mean OP visits increased from 2.8 to 5.5 PPY. Total cost was US$ 4265 (pre-HAART period) and US$ 9445 PPY (HAART period) of which 66 and 84%, respectively were spent on antiretroviral drugs. Median progression time was 6.3 years in the pre-HAART period compared with 12.5 years in HAART period (log rank chi = 270, P
PubMed ID
15622317 View in PubMed
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In back alleys near Vancouver's AIDS conference, the disease was gaining ground.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210830
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Oct 15;155(8):1160-3
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Oct-15-1996
Author
R. Cairney
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Oct 15;155(8):1160-3
Date
Oct-15-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - drug therapy - economics - epidemiology
Adult
Antiviral Agents - supply & distribution
Attitude to Health
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cost of Illness
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Female
Health Care Costs
Homosexuality
Humans
Male
Mass Behavior
Needle Sharing
Sexual Behavior
Abstract
There was much more to this summer's international AIDS conference in Vancouver than reports by researchers. Richard Cairney says the $15-million conference attracted a mix of activists, demonstrators, physicians and business representatives, and they coexisted somewhat uneasily.
PubMed ID
8873643 View in PubMed
Less detail

Less expensive version of AZT approved.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223313
Source
Todays OR Nurse. 1992 Aug;14(8):40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1992

14 records – page 1 of 2.