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Active Smarter Kids (ASK): Rationale and design of a cluster-randomized controlled trial investigating the effects of daily physical activity on children's academic performance and risk factors for non-communicable diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269990
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:709
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Geir K Resaland
Vegard Fusche Moe
Eivind Aadland
Jostein Steene-Johannessen
Øyvind Glosvik
John R Andersen
Olav M Kvalheim
Heather A McKay
Sigmund A Anderssen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:709
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Child
Cluster analysis
Exercise - psychology
Female
Health Promotion - methods - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Male
Norway
Obesity - prevention & control
Physical Education and Training
Primary Prevention
Quality of Life
Risk factors
School Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Evidence is emerging from school-based studies that physical activity might favorably affect children's academic performance. However, there is a need for high-quality studies to support this. Therefore, the main objective of the Active Smarter Kids (ASK) study is to investigate the effect of daily physical activity on children's academic performance. Because of the complexity of the relation between physical activity and academic performance it is important to identify mediating and moderating variables such as cognitive function, fitness, adiposity, motor skills and quality of life (QoL). Further, there are global concerns regarding the high prevalence of lifestyle-related non-communicable diseases (NCDs). The best means to address this challenge could be through primary prevention. Physical activity is known to play a key role in preventing a host of NCDs. Therefore, we investigated as a secondary objective the effect of the intervention on risk factors related to NCDs. The purpose of this paper is to describe the design of the ASK study, the ASK intervention as well as the scope and details of the methods we adopted to evaluate the effect of the ASK intervention on 5 (th) grade children.
The ASK study is a cluster randomized controlled trial that includes 1145 fifth graders (aged 10 years) from 57 schools (28 intervention schools; 29 control schools) in Sogn and Fjordane County, Norway. This represents 95.3 % of total possible recruitment. Children in all 57 participating schools took part in a curriculum-prescribed physical activity intervention (90 min/week of physical education (PE) and 45 min/week physical activity, in total; 135 min/week). In addition, children from intervention schools also participated in the ASK intervention model (165 min/week), i.e. a total of 300 min/week of physical activity/PE. The ASK study was implemented over 7 months, from November 2014 to June 2015. We assessed academic performance in reading, numeracy and English using Norwegian National tests delivered by The Norwegian Directorate for Education and Training. We assessed physical activity objectively at baseline, midpoint and at the end of the intervention. All other variables were measured at baseline and post-intervention. In addition, we used qualitative methodologies to obtain an in-depth understanding of children's embodied experiences and pedagogical processes taking place during the intervention.
If successful, ASK could provide strong evidence of a relation between physical activity and academic performance that could potentially inform the process of learning in elementary schools. Schools might also be identified as effective settings for large scale public health initiatives for the prevention of NCDs.
Clinicaltrials.gov ID nr: NCT02132494 . Date of registration, 6(th) of May, 2014.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26215478 View in PubMed
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Bilingualism, school achievement, and mental wellbeing: a follow-up study of return migrant children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32859
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2000 Feb;41(2):261-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
L. Vuorenkoski
O. Kuure
I. Moilanen
V. Penninkilampi
A. Myhrman
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2000 Feb;41(2):261-6
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Child Development - physiology
Culture
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Emigration and Immigration
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Language
Mental health
Multilingualism
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
In the first phase of this follow-up study we investigated how the use of more than one language affects mental wellbeing and school achievement among 320 school-aged Finnish-Swedish re-migrant children. Now, in the second phase, we screened the same series of children 6 years after migration for psychiatric and psychosomatic symptoms. Out of five groups distinguished in terms of patterns of language use, two had fared well and three showed evident vulnerability. Both successful groups were marked by consistent use of the two languages, Finnish and Swedish, whereas the risk groups were characterised by mixed use of languages before re-migration or substantial language shift after re-migration.
PubMed ID
10750552 View in PubMed
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Effects of physical activity on schoolchildren's academic performance: The Active Smarter Kids (ASK) cluster-randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287348
Source
Prev Med. 2016 Oct;91:322-328
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Geir K Resaland
Eivind Aadland
Vegard Fusche Moe
Katrine N Aadland
Turid Skrede
Mette Stavnsbo
Laura Suominen
Jostein Steene-Johannessen
Øyvind Glosvik
John R Andersen
Olav M Kvalheim
Gunn Engelsrud
Lars B Andersen
Ingar M Holme
Yngvar Ommundsen
Susi Kriemler
Willem van Mechelen
Heather A McKay
Ulf Ekelund
Sigmund A Anderssen
Source
Prev Med. 2016 Oct;91:322-328
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry - methods
Achievement
Child
Exercise - physiology
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Learning
Male
Norway
Schools
Abstract
To investigate the effect of a seven-month, school-based cluster-randomized controlled trial on academic performance in 10-year-old children.
In total, 1129 fifth-grade children from 57 elementary schools in Sogn og Fjordane County, Norway, were cluster-randomized by school either to the intervention group or to the control group. The children in the 28 intervention schools participated in a physical activity intervention between November 2014 and June 2015 consisting of three components: 1) 90min/week of physically active educational lessons mainly carried out in the school playground; 2) 5min/day of physical activity breaks during classroom lessons; 3) 10min/day physical activity homework. Academic performance in numeracy, reading and English was measured using standardized Norwegian national tests. Physical activity was measured objectively by accelerometry.
We found no effect of the intervention on academic performance in primary analyses (standardized difference 0.01-0.06, p>0.358). Subgroup analyses, however, revealed a favorable intervention effect for those who performed the poorest at baseline (lowest tertile) for numeracy (p=0.005 for the subgroup*group interaction), compared to controls (standardized difference 0.62, 95% CI 0.19-1.07).
This large, rigorously conducted cluster RCT in 10-year-old children supports the notion that there is still inadequate evidence to conclude that increased physical activity in school enhances academic achievement in all children. Still, combining physical activity and learning seems a viable model to stimulate learning in those academically weakest schoolchildren.
PubMed ID
27612574 View in PubMed
Less detail

Psychiatric disorders, performance level at school and special education at early elementary school age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199639
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1999;8 Suppl 4:48-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
K. Kumpulainen
E. Räsänen
I. Henttonen
K. Puura
I. Moilanen
J. Piha
T. Tamminen
F. Almqvist
Author Affiliation
Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Child Psychiatry, Finland. kirsti.kumpulainen@kuh.fi
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1999;8 Suppl 4:48-54
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Age Factors
Child
Education, Special
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Mass Screening
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Abstract
We assessed the relationship between psychological deviance and performance level at school among 8-year-old children. The use of special education among children with psychiatric disorders was also studied. In Stage 1, 5813 children were studied using the Rutter Parent Questionnaire (RA2), the Rutter Teacher Questionnaire (RB2) and the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI). In Stage 2, a subsample (n = 424) of these children were interviewed, using the Isle of Wight Interview. In Stage 1, more children defined as low achievers (LAs) came from low SES families than did average (NAs) and high achievers (HAs). They also had more psychiatric symptoms, and they scored above the cutoff (13 points on the RA2, nine points on the RB2 and 17 points on the CDI) more commonly than other children. In Stage 2, two thirds of children who received special education had some psychiatric disorder. The probability of a child with psychiatric disorder obtaining some extra tutoring or special education was 3.1-fold when compared with children without psychiatric disorders. Depressive children and children with attention deficit disorders most commonly had extra tutoring (4.8-fold) when compared with children without psychiatric disorders. The probability of getting special education was highest for attention deficit disorders (6.2-fold), thereafter for anxiety (3.1-fold), and for oppositional/conduct disorders (2.8-fold).
PubMed ID
10654133 View in PubMed
Less detail