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Bilingualism, school achievement, and mental wellbeing: a follow-up study of return migrant children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32859
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2000 Feb;41(2):261-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
L. Vuorenkoski
O. Kuure
I. Moilanen
V. Penninkilampi
A. Myhrman
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2000 Feb;41(2):261-6
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Child Development - physiology
Culture
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Emigration and Immigration
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Language
Mental health
Multilingualism
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
In the first phase of this follow-up study we investigated how the use of more than one language affects mental wellbeing and school achievement among 320 school-aged Finnish-Swedish re-migrant children. Now, in the second phase, we screened the same series of children 6 years after migration for psychiatric and psychosomatic symptoms. Out of five groups distinguished in terms of patterns of language use, two had fared well and three showed evident vulnerability. Both successful groups were marked by consistent use of the two languages, Finnish and Swedish, whereas the risk groups were characterised by mixed use of languages before re-migration or substantial language shift after re-migration.
PubMed ID
10750552 View in PubMed
Less detail

Psychiatric disorders, performance level at school and special education at early elementary school age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199639
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1999;8 Suppl 4:48-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
K. Kumpulainen
E. Räsänen
I. Henttonen
K. Puura
I. Moilanen
J. Piha
T. Tamminen
F. Almqvist
Author Affiliation
Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Child Psychiatry, Finland. kirsti.kumpulainen@kuh.fi
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1999;8 Suppl 4:48-54
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Age Factors
Child
Education, Special
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Mass Screening
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Abstract
We assessed the relationship between psychological deviance and performance level at school among 8-year-old children. The use of special education among children with psychiatric disorders was also studied. In Stage 1, 5813 children were studied using the Rutter Parent Questionnaire (RA2), the Rutter Teacher Questionnaire (RB2) and the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI). In Stage 2, a subsample (n = 424) of these children were interviewed, using the Isle of Wight Interview. In Stage 1, more children defined as low achievers (LAs) came from low SES families than did average (NAs) and high achievers (HAs). They also had more psychiatric symptoms, and they scored above the cutoff (13 points on the RA2, nine points on the RB2 and 17 points on the CDI) more commonly than other children. In Stage 2, two thirds of children who received special education had some psychiatric disorder. The probability of a child with psychiatric disorder obtaining some extra tutoring or special education was 3.1-fold when compared with children without psychiatric disorders. Depressive children and children with attention deficit disorders most commonly had extra tutoring (4.8-fold) when compared with children without psychiatric disorders. The probability of getting special education was highest for attention deficit disorders (6.2-fold), thereafter for anxiety (3.1-fold), and for oppositional/conduct disorders (2.8-fold).
PubMed ID
10654133 View in PubMed
Less detail