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American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) survey of radiation biology educators in U.S. and Canadian radiation oncology residency programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148696
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2009 Nov 1;75(3):896-905
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2009
Author
Barry S Rosenstein
Kathryn D Held
Sara Rockwell
Jacqueline P Williams
Elaine M Zeman
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave Levy Place, New York, NY 10029, USA. barry.rosenstein@mssm.edu
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2009 Nov 1;75(3):896-905
Date
Nov-1-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation - standards
Age Factors
Aging
Biophysics - education - manpower
Canada
Educational Measurement - methods - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Faculty, Medical - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Forecasting
Humans
Internship and Residency - organization & administration - standards
Mentors
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Radiation Oncology - education - manpower - organization & administration - trends
Radiobiology - education - manpower - organization & administration - trends
Research - statistics & numerical data
Societies, Medical - standards
Teaching - manpower - organization & administration - trends
Teaching Materials - supply & distribution
Time Factors
United States
Abstract
To obtain, in a survey-based study, detailed information on the faculty currently responsible for teaching radiation biology courses to radiation oncology residents in the United States and Canada.
In March-December 2007 a survey questionnaire was sent to faculty having primary responsibility for teaching radiation biology to residents in 93 radiation oncology residency programs in the United States and Canada.
The responses to this survey document the aging of the faculty who have primary responsibility for teaching radiation biology to radiation oncology residents. The survey found a dramatic decline with time in the percentage of educators whose graduate training was in radiation biology. A significant number of the educators responsible for teaching radiation biology were not fully acquainted with the radiation sciences, either through training or practical application. In addition, many were unfamiliar with some of the organizations setting policies and requirements for resident education. Freely available tools, such as the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Radiation and Cancer Biology Practice Examination and Study Guides, were widely used by residents and educators. Consolidation of resident courses or use of a national radiation biology review course was viewed as unlikely by most programs.
A high priority should be given to the development of comprehensive teaching tools to assist those individuals who have responsibility for teaching radiation biology courses but who do not have an extensive background in critical areas of radiobiology related to radiation oncology. These findings also suggest a need for new graduate programs in radiobiology.
Notes
Cites: Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1992;24(5):847-91447014
Cites: Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1996 Jul 1;35(4):821-68690652
Cites: Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1999 Aug 1;45(1):153-6110477019
Cites: Radiat Res. 2007 Aug;168(2):262-517722362
Cites: Radiat Res. 2003 Dec;160(6):729-3714640790
Cites: Acad Radiol. 2000 Mar;7(3):176-8310730813
Cites: Radiat Res. 2002 May;157(5):599-60611966327
Cites: Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2002 Nov 1;54(3):861-7212377340
Cites: J Am Coll Radiol. 2008 Oct;5(10):1077-918812152
PubMed ID
19733012 View in PubMed
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At least 12 US states refuse to recognize physician training accredited in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205740
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Apr 21;158(8):1061-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-21-1998
Author
M. Korcok
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Apr 21;158(8):1061-3
Date
Apr-21-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation - standards
Canada
Education, Medical
Education, Medical, Graduate - standards
Emigration and Immigration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Licensure - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Physicians - supply & distribution
Population Dynamics
Specialization
United States
Abstract
The easing of trade rules has done little to ease the movement of physicians between Canada and the US. Borders may be breaking down when it comes to the transfer of goods, Milan Korcok reports, but for physicians the moats in front of those borders appear to be getting deeper and more difficult to cross.
PubMed ID
9580739 View in PubMed
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The Canadian Association of Radiologists Mammography Accreditation Program spurs improved quality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104147
Source
Can Assoc Radiol J. 2014 Aug;65(3):194-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Jacques Lévesque
Author Affiliation
294 Albert Street, Suite 600, Ottawa, ON K1P 6E6, Canada. Electronic address: jlevesque@car.ca.
Source
Can Assoc Radiol J. 2014 Aug;65(3):194-5
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation - standards
Breast Neoplasms - radiography
Canada
Female
Humans
Mammography - standards
Program Evaluation
Societies, Medical
PubMed ID
24974361 View in PubMed
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[Clinical leaders' and staff's assessment of the current quality related to the patient pathways and expectations of and knowledge about accreditation--a baseline evaluation in Copenhagen County].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166373
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 Nov 13;168(46):3993-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-13-2006
Author
Rikke Gut
Janne Lehmann Knudsen
Morten Freil
Anders Jørgen Jensen
Author Affiliation
Amtssygehuset i Glostrup, Enheden for Brugerundersøgelser i Københavns Amt, og Sundhedsforvaltningen i Københavns Amt. rikgut01@glostruphosp.kbhamt.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 Nov 13;168(46):3993-7
Date
Nov-13-2006
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation - standards
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Denmark
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hospital Planning - standards
Hospitals - standards
Humans
Leadership
Patient satisfaction
Personnel, Hospital
Professional Role
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Questionnaires
Abstract
In the preparation for accreditation in Copenhagen County the commitment of clinical leaders and staff members is crucial. The objectives of these surveys are to examine the leaders' and the staff's assessment of quality improvement and their expectations and knowledge about accreditation, as well as the staff's advice concerning the further planning.
Two surveys among clinical leaders and staff members were carried out.
Statistically, significant differences between staff and leaders were found in many areas concerning quality improvement and knowledge about accreditation. Leaders and staff both had high expectations of the use of accreditation as a tool for quality improvement, thus no statistically significant difference between expectations were found.
The overall positive expectation for accreditation as a tool for quality improvement is an excellent basis for the accreditation process. The different assessments in quality among leaders/staff and positions show the need to involve all personnel in the organization. A survey about patient experiences includes the same subjects as the survey among staff and leaders. A striking discrepancy between the evaluation of quality by patients and by the leaders and staff in specific areas was found; therefore further investigations will be carried out.
PubMed ID
17125652 View in PubMed
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Compliance with hospital accreditation and patient mortality: a Danish nationwide population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270828
Source
Int J Qual Health Care. 2015 Jun;27(3):165-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Anne Mette Falstie-Jensen
Heidi Larsson
Erik Hollnagel
Mette Nørgaard
Marie Louise Overgaard Svendsen
Søren Paaske Johnsen
Source
Int J Qual Health Care. 2015 Jun;27(3):165-74
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation - standards - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark
Female
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Mortality
Hospitals, Public - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Quality of Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Risk Management
Abstract
To examine the association between compliance with hospital accreditation and 30-day mortality.
A nationwide population-based, follow-up study with data from national, public registries.
Public, non-psychiatric Danish hospitals.
In-patients diagnosed with one of the 80 primary diagnoses.
Accreditation by the first version of The Danish Healthcare Quality Programme for hospitals from 2010 to 2012. Compliance were assessed by surveyors on an on-site survey and awarded the hospital as a whole; fully (n = 11) or partially accredited (n = 20). A follow-up activity was requested for partially accredited hospitals; submitting additional documentation (n = 11) or by having a return-visit (n = 9).
All-cause mortality within 30-days after admission. Multivariable logistic regression was used to compute odds ratios (ORs) for 30-day mortality adjusted for six confounding factors and for cluster effect at hospital level.
A total of 276 980 in-patients were identified. Thirty-day mortality risk for in-patients at fully (n = 76 518) and partially accredited hospitals (n = 200 462) was 4.14% (95% confidence interval (CI):4.00-4.28) and 4.28% (95% CI: 4.20-4.37), respectively. In-patients at fully accredited hospitals had a lower risk of dying within 30-days after admission than in-patients at partially accredited hospitals (adjusted OR of 0.83; 95% CI: 0.72-0.96). A lower risk of 30-day mortality was observed among in-patients at partially accredited hospitals required to submit additional documentation compared with in-patients at partially accredited hospitals requiring a return-visit (adjusted OR 0.83; 95% CI: 0.67-1.02).
Admissions at fully accredited hospitals were associated with a lower 30-day mortality risk than admissions at partially accredited hospitals.
PubMed ID
25921337 View in PubMed
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The effects of a randomised multi-centre trial and international accreditation on availability and quality of clinical guidelines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46983
Source
Int J Health Care Qual Assur Inc Leadersh Health Serv. 2005;18(4-5):321-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Anne Benedicte Juul
Christian Gluud
Jørn Wetterslev
Torben Callesen
Gorm Jensen
Allan Kofoed-Enevoldsen
Author Affiliation
The Copenhagen Trial Unit, Centre for Clinical Intervention Research, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Int J Health Care Qual Assur Inc Leadersh Health Serv. 2005;18(4-5):321-8
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation - standards
Denmark
Diabetes mellitus
Guidelines
Internationality
Perioperative Care
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
PURPOSE: To examine the availability and quality of clinical guidelines on perioperative diabetes care in hospital units before and after a randomised clinical trial (RCT) and international accreditation. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: Interventional "before-after" study in 51 units (38 surgical and 13 anaesthetic) in nine hospitals participating in a RCT in the greater Copenhagen area; 27 of the units also underwent international accreditation. FINDINGS: The proportion of units with guidelines increased from 24/51 (47 percent) units before to 38/51 (75 percent) units after the trial. Among the 27 units without guidelines before the trial, significantly more accredited units compared to non-accredited units had a guideline after the trial (9/10 (90 percent) compared to 5/17 (29 percent). The quality of the systematic development scale and the clinical scales improved significantly after the trial in both accredited units (both p
PubMed ID
16167646 View in PubMed
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Giving nurses a voice in patient safety.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153518
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Nov;104(9):24-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Lisa Ashley
Author Affiliation
Canadian Nurses Association.
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Nov;104(9):24-5
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation - standards
Canada
Humans
Nursing Care - standards
Risk Management - organization & administration
Societies, Nursing
PubMed ID
19105320 View in PubMed
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Healthcare-associated infections: infection prevention and control within the Accreditation Canada Qmentum Program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149740
Source
Healthc Pap. 2009;9(3):26-31; discussion 60-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Wendy Nicklin
Paula Greco
Jonathan I Mitchell
Source
Healthc Pap. 2009;9(3):26-31; discussion 60-2
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation - standards
Canada - epidemiology
Clostridium difficile
Cross Infection - epidemiology - prevention & control
Enterocolitis, Pseudomembranous - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Infection Control - methods
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Safety - standards
Staphylococcal Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Surgical Wound Infection - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Gardam, Lemieux, Reason, van Dijk and Goel argue that healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are "a pressing and imminent concern in the context of patient safety." Accreditation Canada supports the position taken by these authors. The prevention and control of two HAIs of great concern, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile, are an integral part of the Accreditation Canada program. A coordinated approach to combating HAIs and developing a culture of infection prevention and control is necessary, one that involves front-line healthcare professionals, senior leadership, national and provincial partners and the public. Since 2005, Accreditation Canada has increasingly strengthened the accreditation program in this area through a number of new strategies, including enhanced standards, required organizational practices, performance measures and indicators and the introduction of education programs. Optimizing the value of accreditation through an integrative approach with organizations' quality improvement programs will contribute to effectively combating HAIs and developing a culture of infection prevention and control.
PubMed ID
19593072 View in PubMed
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Interventional cardiology fellowship training in Canada: a report card using standardized criteria.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132895
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2011 Aug 1;78(2):179-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2011
Author
Payam Dehghani
David A Wood
Waseem Sharieff
Nida Basit
Asim N Cheema
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2011 Aug 1;78(2):179-86
Date
Aug-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation - standards
Canada
Cardiac Catheterization - standards
Cardiology - education - standards
Clinical Competence - standards
Cross-Sectional Studies
Curriculum - standards
Education, Medical, Graduate - standards
Faculty, Medical - standards
Fellowships and Scholarships - standards
Female
Guideline Adherence
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Internship and Residency - standards
Male
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Societies, Medical - standards
Abstract
Several institutions in Canada offer fellowship training in interventional cardiology (IC). However, no national mechanism exists to ensure uniformity of training or assessment of final competency.
A cross-sectional survey was carried out for physicians completing IC training from 2007 to 2009. The survey used a semistructured questionnaire to determine compliance with training components recommended by Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and American College of Cardiology (ACC).
Sixty-six (78%) of 85 trainees from 15 programs participated in the study. All programs were affiliated with a university and associated with accredited programs in adult cardiology. Annual procedural volume of >1,500 and faculty volume of >250 were reported for 67% and 70% of programs. Annual trainee percutaneous coronary intervention volume of 250-350 was reported by 29%, 350-450 by 47%, and >450 by 24% of respondents. All respondents reported regular participation in case management rounds, and 54% reported formal instruction of structured curriculum; 91% reported participation in research, and 38% reported mandatory attendance in outpatient clinic. All respondents reported annual and 61% reported =2 performance evaluations per year; 45% of respondents reported formal trainee assessment of program and faculty.
Canadian IC training meets ACGME/ACC recommendations for procedural volume and academic activity. However, participation in outpatient clinics and compliance with administrative requirement of faculty and program assessment by trainee was suboptimal. Formal accreditation is highly desirable to standardize program content and administration for optimal IC training.
Notes
Comment In: Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2011 Aug 1;78(2):187-821786390
PubMed ID
21766428 View in PubMed
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A program to accredit laboratories for reliable testing of pork and horse meat for Trichinella.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174041
Source
Vet Parasitol. 2005 Sep 5;132(1-2):173-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-5-2005
Author
Lorry B Forbes
W Brad Scandrett
Alvin A Gajadhar
Author Affiliation
Centre for Animal Parasitology, Saskatoon Laboratory, Canadian Food Inspection Agency, 116 Veterinary Road, Saskatoon, Sask., Canada S7N 2R3. lforbes@inspection.gc.ca
Source
Vet Parasitol. 2005 Sep 5;132(1-2):173-7
Date
Sep-5-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation - standards
Animals
Canada
Food Inspection - methods - standards
Horse Diseases - parasitology
Horses
Humans
Laboratories - standards
Meat - parasitology
Quality Control
Swine
Swine Diseases - parasitology
Trichinella - isolation & purification
Trichinellosis - parasitology - prevention & control
Abstract
The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has developed a program to accredit external laboratories to conduct Trichinella digestion assays for export purposes. Accredited laboratories are responsible for staffing, equipment and operating test facilities under the auspices and guidance of the CFIA. The CFIA's Centre for Animal Parasitology provides training, proficiency samples, audits and other support for the accreditation process. The program has also been adapted for use in laboratories conducting Trichinella digestion tests for surveillance and food safety purposes and provides a useful template for others wishing to develop similar systems.
PubMed ID
15993541 View in PubMed
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17 records – page 1 of 2.