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139 records – page 1 of 14.

The 2002-2003 supervision program unveiled.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189996
Source
Infirm Que. 2002 May-Jun;9(5 Suppl):4
Publication Type
Article

2010 Canadian Association of Gastroenterology educational needs assessment report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138566
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2010 Dec;24(12):697-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Alaa Rostom
Sandra Daniels
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2010 Dec;24(12):697-9
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation
Canada
Clinical Competence
Gastroenterology - education
Humans
Needs Assessment
PubMed ID
21165375 View in PubMed
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Accreditation: a cultural control strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156493
Source
Int J Health Care Qual Assur. 2008;21(2):146-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
André Paccioni
Claude Sicotte
François Champagne
Author Affiliation
Centre of Interdisciplinary Research on Rehabilitation of Greater Montreal, Quebec, Canada. andre.paccioni@umontreal.ca
Source
Int J Health Care Qual Assur. 2008;21(2):146-58
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation - organization & administration
Health Services Research
Humans
Leadership
Longitudinal Studies
Organizational Culture
Patient satisfaction
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Quality Assurance, Health Care - organization & administration
Quebec
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to describe and understand the effects of the accreditation process on organizational control and quality management practices in two Quebec primary-care health organizations.
A multiple-case longitudinal study was conducted taking a mixed qualitative/quantitative approach. An analytical model was developed of the effects of the accreditation process on the type of organizational control exercised and the quality management practices implemented. The data were collected through group interviews, semi-directed interviews of key informers, non-participant observations, a review of the literature, and structured questionnaires distributed to all the employees working in both institutions.
The accreditation process has fostered the implementation of consultation mechanisms in self-assessment teams. Improving assessments of client satisfaction was identified as a prime objective but, in terms of the values promoted in organizations, accreditation has little effect on the perceptions of employees not directly involved in the process. As long as not all staff members have integrated the basis for accreditation and its outcomes, the accreditation process appears to remain an external, bureaucratic control instrument.
This study provides a theoretical model for understanding organizational changes brought about by accreditation of primary services. Through self-assessment of professional values and standards, accreditation may foster better quality management practices.
PubMed ID
18578200 View in PubMed
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Accreditation and improvement in process quality of care: a nationwide study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274471
Source
Int J Qual Health Care. 2015 Oct;27(5):336-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Søren Bie Bogh
Anne Mette Falstie-Jensen
Paul Bartels
Erik Hollnagel
Søren Paaske Johnsen
Source
Int J Qual Health Care. 2015 Oct;27(5):336-43
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Follow-Up Studies
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Heart Failure - therapy
Hospital Bed Capacity
Hospitals, Public - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Peptic Ulcer - therapy
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Quality Improvement - statistics & numerical data
Quality Indicators, Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Residence Characteristics
Stroke - therapy
Abstract
To examine whether performance measures improve more in accredited hospitals than in non-accredited hospital.
A historical follow-up study was performed using process of care data from all public Danish hospitals in order to examine the development over time in performance measures according to participation in accreditation programs.
All patients admitted for acute stroke, heart failure or ulcer at Danish hospitals.
Hospital accreditation by either The Joint Commission International or The Health Quality Service.
The primary outcome was a change in opportunity-based composite score and the secondary outcome was a change in all-or-none scores, both measures were based on the individual processes of care. These processes included seven processes related to stroke, six processes to heart failure, four to bleeding ulcer and four to perforated ulcer.
A total of 27 273 patients were included. The overall opportunity-based composite score improved for both non-accredited and accredited hospitals (13.7% [95% CI 10.6; 16.8] and 9.9% [95% 5.4; 14.4], respectively), but the improvements were significantly higher for non-accredited hospitals (absolute difference: 3.8% [95% 0.8; 8.3]). No significant differences were found at disease level. The overall all-or-none score increased significantly for non-accredited hospitals, but not for accredited hospitals. The absolute difference between improvements in the all-or-none score at non-accredited and accredited hospitals was not significant (3.2% [95% -3.6:9.9]).
Participating in accreditation was not associated with larger improvement in performance measures for acute stroke, heart failure or ulcer.
PubMed ID
26239473 View in PubMed
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Accreditation of occupational health services in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278579
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2015 Dec;65(9):722-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
A. Lie
O. Bjørnstad
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2015 Dec;65(9):722-4
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Health Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Medicine
Pilot Projects
Quality Assurance, Health Care - standards
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
In 2010, an accreditation system for occupational health services (OHS) in Norway was implemented.
To examine OHS experiences of the accreditation system in Norway 4 years after its implementation.
A web-based questionnaire was sent to all accredited OHS asking about their experiences with the accreditation system. Responses were compared with a similar survey conducted in 2011.
The response rate was 76% (173/228). OHS reported that the most common changes they had had to make to achieve accreditation were: improvement of their quality assurance system (53%), a plan for competence development (44%) and increased staffing in occupational hygiene (36%) and occupational medicine (28%). The OHS attributed improved quality in their own OHS (56%) and in OHS in Norway (47%), to the accreditation process.
The accreditation system was well accepted by OHS, who reported that it had improved the quality of their OHS and of OHS in Norway. The results are similar to the findings of a 2011 survey.
Notes
Cites: Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2002;15(2):159-6312216773
Cites: Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2002;15(2):173-712216775
PubMed ID
26276757 View in PubMed
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[Accreditation should be discussed! Need for substance abuse testing at the workplace should be increased]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10925
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 Jan 28;95(5):407-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-28-1998
Author
O. Beck
P. Hjemdahl
Author Affiliation
Avdelningen för klinisk farmakologi, Karolinska laboratoriet, Karolinska sjukhuset, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 Jan 28;95(5):407-8
Date
Jan-28-1998
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation
Humans
Laboratories - standards
Occupational Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Substance Abuse Detection - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Sweden
PubMed ID
9492489 View in PubMed
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[Accreditation visit. An enriching experience].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235217
Source
Nurs Que. 1987 May-Jun;7(3):59
Publication Type
Article

Achieving the National Quality Forum's "Never Events": prevention of wrong site, wrong procedure, and wrong patient operations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164254
Source
Ann Surg. 2007 Apr;245(4):526-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Robert K Michaels
Martin A Makary
Yasser Dahab
Frank J Frassica
Eugenie Heitmiller
Lisa C Rowen
Richard Crotreau
Henry Brem
Peter J Pronovost
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA.
Source
Ann Surg. 2007 Apr;245(4):526-32
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Protocols
Humans
Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations
Medical Errors - prevention & control
Medical Laboratory Science
Risk factors
Safety
Safety Management - methods
Societies, Medical
Surgery Department, Hospital - organization & administration - standards
Surgical Procedures, Operative - standards
United States
United States Department of Veterans Affairs
Abstract
Review the evidence regarding methods to prevent wrong site operations and present a framework that healthcare organizations can use to evaluate whether they have reduced the probability of wrong site, wrong procedure, and wrong patient operations.
Operations involving the wrong site, patient, and procedure continue despite national efforts by regulators and professional organizations. Little is known about effective policies to reduce these "never events," and healthcare professional's knowledge or appropriate use of these policies to mitigate events.
A literature review of the evidence was performed using PubMed and Google; key words used were wrong site surgery, wrong side surgery, wrong patient surgery, and wrong procedure surgery. The framework to evaluate safety includes assessing if a behaviorally specific policy or procedure exists, whether staff knows about the policy, and whether the policy is being used appropriately.
Higher-level policies or programs have been implemented by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery, Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, Veteran's Health Administration, Canadian Orthopaedic, and the North American Spine Society Associations to reduce wrong site surgery. No scientific evidence is available to guide hospitals in evaluating whether they have an effective policy, and whether staff know of the policy and appropriately use the policy to prevent "never events."
There is limited evidence of behavioral interventions to reduce wrong site, patient, and surgical procedures. We have outlined a framework of measures that healthcare organizations can use to start evaluating whether they have reduced adverse events in operations.
Notes
Cites: Anesthesiology. 2006 Nov;105(5):877-8417065879
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2006 Aug;41(4 Pt 2):1599-61716898981
Cites: J Crit Care. 2003 Jun;18(2):71-512800116
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1998 Apr;80(4):4639563374
Cites: Crit Care Clin. 2005 Jan;21(1):1-19, vii15579349
Cites: Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2005 Jan-Feb;30(1):99-10315690274
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2005 Oct;87(10):2193-516203882
Cites: Pediatrics. 2005 Dec;116(6):1506-1216322178
Cites: Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2006 Feb;32(2):102-816568924
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2006 Apr 4;144(7):510-616585665
Cites: Arch Surg. 2006 Apr;141(4):353-7; discussion 357-816618892
Cites: Ann Surg. 2006 May;243(5):628-32; discussion 632-516632997
Cites: Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2006 Jun;32(6):351-516776390
Cites: Crit Care Med. 2006 Jul;34(7):1988-9516715029
Cites: JAMA. 2006 Aug 9;296(6):696-916896113
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2003 Feb;85-A(2):193-712571293
PubMed ID
17414599 View in PubMed
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139 records – page 1 of 14.