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[Accidental explosions in Denmark when working on containers for combustible fluids]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38214
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Jan 30;151(5):305-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-1989
Author
B. Bak
M. Juhl
M. Mikkelsen
F. Lauridsen
J. Pilegaard
N D Røck
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Jan 30;151(5):305-7
Date
Jan-30-1989
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Child
Denmark
English Abstract
Explosions
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
Gases may be formed in containers for inflammable fluids and these may burn explosively if lit. Even apparently empty containers may contain sufficient quantities of gas to result in violent explosions precipitated by procedures which produce heat or sparks in the neighbourhood of the container. Seventeen persons were found to be injured in accidents of this type in a Danish investigation. Two of the accidental injuries proved fatal. The serious risk involved in handling and treating containers which contain or have contained inflammable fluids is, therefore, emphasized.
PubMed ID
2919448 View in PubMed
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Accident rates and types among self-employed private forest owners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100478
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2010 Nov;42(6):1729-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Ola Lindroos
Lage Burström
Author Affiliation
Department of Forest Resource Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden. ola.lindroos@srh.slu.se
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2010 Nov;42(6):1729-35
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - mortality - prevention & control
Adult
Causality
Cause of Death
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forestry - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ownership - statistics & numerical data
Private Sector - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Risk factors
Sick Leave
Sweden
Wounds and Injuries - mortality
Abstract
Half of all Swedish forests are owned by private individuals, and at least 215,000 people work in these privately owned forest holdings. However, only lethal accidents are systematically monitored among self-employed forest workers. Therefore, data from the registries of the Swedish Work Environment Authority, the Labor Insurance Organization and the regional University Hospital in Umeå were gathered to allow us to perform a more in-depth assessment of the rate and types of accidents that occurred among private forest owners. We found large differences between the registries in the type and number of accidents that were reported. We encountered difficulties in defining "self-employed forest worker" and also in determining whether the accidents that did occur happened during work or leisure time. Consequently, the estimates for the accident rate that we obtained varied from 32 to > or = 4300 injured persons per year in Sweden, depending on the registry that was consulted, the definition of the sample population that was used, and the accident severity definition that was employed. Nevertheless, the different registries gave a consistent picture of the types of accidents that occur while individuals are participating in self-employed forestry work. Severe accidents were relatively common, as self-employed forestry work fatalities constituted 7% of the total number of fatalities in the work authority registry. Falling trees were associated with many of these fatal accidents as well as with accidents that resulted in severe non-fatal injuries. Thus, unsafe work methods appeared more related to the occurrence of an accident than the equipment that was being used at the time of the accident (e.g., a chainsaw). Improvement of the workers' skills should therefore be considered to be an important prevention measure that should be undertaken in this field. The challenges in improving the safety in these smallest of companies, which fall somewhere between the purview of occupational and consumer safety, are exemplified and discussed.
PubMed ID
20728623 View in PubMed
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[Accidents and accident mortality in Denmark--a comparison with Scandinavia and Europe]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11630
Source
Nord Med. 1994;109(10):265-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
T B Hansen
N D Röck
A. Poulstrup
S. Sabroe
J. Steensberg
B. Netterstrøm
Author Affiliation
Ortopaedkirurgisk afd 0 og Ulykkes Analyse Gruppen, Odense Universitets Hospital.
Source
Nord Med. 1994;109(10):265-8
Date
1994
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, occupational - mortality
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcoholic Intoxication - mortality
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Poisoning - mortality
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
As the development in mean age of the population and life expectancy has been less favourable in Denmark than in the rest of Western Europe, the Ministry of Health decided to investigate statistics for the period, 1972-1990, for the main areas where Danish life expectancy was poorer. A sharp increase in the incidence of accidental poisoning with medical drugs and alcohol during the period was found to be a factor contributing to the poorer Danish statistics during the period. In the subcategory, death after a fall, there was an increase in incidence among the elderly, but the loss of life-years remained constant. The subcategory, fatal road accidents, manifested a marked reduction in incidence, despite the increase in traffic density during the period, and there was a reduction in the loss of life-years. Thus, in the category, accidental deaths, the increase in the incidence of accidental poisonings would appear to be the only factor contributing to the poorer development in mean age and life expectancy in Denmark.
PubMed ID
7937021 View in PubMed
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Accident toll in a Norwegian Spitsbergen mining community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36947
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1992;51 Suppl 7:37-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
T. Risholt
Author Affiliation
Longyearbyen Hospital, Norway.
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1992;51 Suppl 7:37-41
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Accidents, occupational - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Abstract
The coal mining community of Longyearbyen suffered a total loss of 84 persons in fatal accidents during the 40-year period from 1950 to 1989. Up to the beginning of the 1970's the great majority of injuries causing death were related to coal mining. In the 20-year period from 1970-1989 14 people died in occupational accidents. 24 were killed during off-work hours. The male population, averaging, 776 individuals through the observation period, run a risk of being involved in a fatal leisure-time accident nearly 3 times that of age-matched groups on the Norwegian mainland. Potential years of life lost for the Spitsbergen group were estimated to be of a magnitude 2.6 times that of the mainland. The females are even worse off with a risk of having a fatal accident which is 18 times higher. Occupational deaths in the mines were nearly 2 times as frequent as in the mines on the Norwegian mainland. We have moved a long way towards the control of fatal occupational accidents. The rise in non-occupational fatal injuries means, however, that the overall safety gain is meagre.
PubMed ID
1285815 View in PubMed
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Alaska's model program for occupational injury prevention: Applying surveillance for effective public health practice

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5922
Source
Pages 714-723 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part II, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
  1 document  
Author
Conway, G.A
Lincoln, J.M
Husberg, B.J
Manwaring, JC
Bensyl, DM
Choromanski, DM
Author Affiliation
CDC/NIOSH/DSR, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA. GConway@cdc.gov
Source
Pages 714-723 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part II, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(4)
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - mortality - prevention & control
Aircraft
Alaska - epidemiology
Humans
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
Population Surveillance
Public Health Practice
Registries
Technology Transfer
United States
Wounds and injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
BACKGROUND: NIOSH established its Alaska Field Station in Anchorage, Alaska, in 1991, after identifying Alaska as America's highest-risk state for traumatic worker fatalities. Since then, NIOSH established comprehensive occupational injury surveillance in Alaska, and formed and facilitated interagency working groups (of state and federal agencies) and industry, labor, and professional organizations to address major factors leading to occupational death and injury in the state. STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive epidemiologic study of registry surveillance data obtained via direct on-site investigation of incidents and data-sharing with jurisdictional agencies. METHODS: We established a surveillance system, obtaining information via data-sharing with jurisdictional agencies and from direct on-site investigation of incidents. Also, we collaborate with state and regional government agencies, industry, workers, and non-governmental organizations to develop interventions. RESULTS: During 1991-1999, Alaska experienced a 50-percent overall decline in work-related deaths, including a substantial decline in commercial fishing deaths, and a very sharp decline in helicopter logging-related deaths. These efforts have lead to major national and international government-industry collaborative efforts in improving the safety of helicopter lift operations, and a concomitant improvement in fishing industry mortality rates among workers fishing Alaskan seas. CONCLUSIONS: Using surveillance data as information for action, these collaborative efforts have contributed to reducing Alaska's high occupational fatality rate. This reduction has been most clearly demonstrated in the rapidly expanding helicopter logging industry. The application of surveillance data also has played an important supportive role in the substantial progress made in reducing the mortality rate in Alaska's commercial fishing industry--historically, Alaska's (and America's) most dangerous industry, and the worst killer of Alaskan workers. Results suggest that extending Alaska's approach to occupational injury surveillance and prevention to other parts of the country, and application of these strategies to the entire spectrum of occupational injury hazards, could have a broad impact on reducing occupational injuries.
PubMed ID
11768453 View in PubMed
Documents
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Alcohol and other drug use in occupational fatalities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226579
Source
J Occup Med. 1991 Apr;33(4):496-500
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1991
Author
B C Alleyne
P. Stuart
R. Copes
Author Affiliation
Alberta Occupational Health and Safety, Edmonton.
Source
J Occup Med. 1991 Apr;33(4):496-500
Date
Apr-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - mortality
Accidents, occupational - mortality
Accidents, Traffic - mortality
Adult
Alberta - epidemiology
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Humans
Male
Marijuana Abuse - epidemiology
Substance Abuse Detection
Abstract
High costs and the potential risk to public health of drug-related workplace accidents are major concerns. Studies conducted to evaluate this problem are restricted by concerns for individual rights and fears of jeopardizing labor relations. However, in collaboration with the Medical Examiner's office. Alberta Occupational Health and Safety examined a unique set of data on 459 deaths occurring at work. The only illicit drug found was cannabis for which 10 workers tested positive. Forty workers tested positive for alcohol, 28 for prescription, and 22 for nonprescription drugs. Evidence of alcohol use was found in a higher percentage of fatalities due to motor vehicle accidents, falls, and being caught in or under equipment than in other types of workplace fatalities.
PubMed ID
2037904 View in PubMed
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The case-fatality rate of occupational injuries: the effect of aging.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217173
Source
Am J Public Health. 1994 Oct;84(10):1696-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1994
Author
M. Rossignol
Source
Am J Public Health. 1994 Oct;84(10):1696-7
Date
Oct-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - mortality
Accidents, occupational - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Notes
Cites: J Trauma. 1972 Mar;12(3):193-2075012817
Cites: Life Sci. 1980 Nov 24;27(21):1985-906111007
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1993 Nov;83(11):1563-68238679
Cites: J Occup Med. 1989 Jan;31(1):23-82738746
Cites: JAMA. 1990 Jun 13;263(22):3047-502342216
Cites: JAMA. 1982 Aug 13;248(6):692-77097919
PubMed ID
7943506 View in PubMed
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[Causes of death in the Sverdlovsk region's population suffered from emergency radiation situations at the Mayak production association].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143362
Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 Mar-Apr;(2):13-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
L G Kon'shina
Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 Mar-Apr;(2):13-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, occupational - mortality
Age Distribution
Aged
Cause of Death - trends
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Radioactive Hazard Release - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Mortality rates were found to increase in three districts of the region (Kamensky, Bogdanovichsky, and Kamyshlovsky ones) after radiation accidents. The highest rate was characteristic of the Kamensky District. A substantial rise in mortality rates was recorded in the first decade following radiation accidents and in the 1980s and 1990s. In these study areas, the change in death rate was most evident for causes, such as circulatory diseases, malignancies, and infectious diseases. An increase in the rates of mortality from perinatal abnormalities and congenital defects was observed in children.
PubMed ID
20496487 View in PubMed
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Commercial fishing deaths - United States, 2000-2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96344
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2010 Jul 16;59(27):842-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-16-2010
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2010 Jul 16;59(27):842-5
Date
Jul-16-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - mortality - prevention & control
Accidents, Occupational - mortality - prevention & control
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Commerce
Female
Fisheries - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Risk factors
Ships
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Commercial fishing is one of the most dangerous occupations in the United States. During 1992-2008, an annual average of 58 reported deaths occurred (128 deaths per 100,000 workers), compared with an average of 5,894 deaths (four per 100,000 workers) among all U.S. workers. During the 1990s, safety interventions addressing specific hazards identified in Alaska resulted in a significant decline in the state's commercial fishing fatality rate. During 2007-2010, CDC expanded surveillance of commercial fishing fatalities to the rest of the country's fishing areas. To review the hazards and risk factors for occupational mortality in the U.S. commercial fishing industry, and to explore how hazards and risk factors differ among fisheries and locations, CDC collected and analyzed data on each fatality reported during 2000-2009. This report summarizes the results, which showed that, among the 504 U.S. commercial fishing deaths, the majority occurred after a vessel disaster (261 deaths, 52%) or a fall overboard (155 deaths, 31%). By region, 133 (26%) deaths occurred off the coast of Alaska, 124 (25%) in the Northeast, 116 (23%) in the Gulf of Mexico, 83 (16%) off the West Coast, and 41 (8%) in the Mid- and South Atlantic. Type of fishing was known in 478 deaths; shellfish (226, 47%) was the most common, followed by groundfish (144, 30%) and pelagic fish (97, 20%). To reduce fatalities in this industry, additional prevention measures tailored to specific high-risk fisheries and focusing on prevention of vessel disasters and falls overboard are needed.
PubMed ID
20631673 View in PubMed
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95 records – page 1 of 10.