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1981 records – page 1 of 199.

A 4-year review of severe pediatric trauma in eastern Ontario: a descriptive analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191929
Source
J Trauma. 2002 Jan;52(1):8-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
Martin H Osmond
Maureen Brennan-Barnes
Allyson L Shephard
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. osmond@cheo.on.ca
Source
J Trauma. 2002 Jan;52(1):8-12
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Child Abuse - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Trauma Centers - statistics & numerical data
Trauma Severity Indices
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The objective of this study was to describe a population of children admitted to a tertiary care pediatric hospital with severe trauma to identify key areas for injury prevention research, and programming.
Retrospective chart review conducted on all children 0-17 years admitted to the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) between April 1, 1996, and March 31, 2000, following acute trauma. Each record was reviewed and assigned an ISS using the AIS 1990 revision. All cases with an ISS > 11 were included in the study.
There were 2610 trauma cases admitted to CHEO over the study period. Of these, 237 (9.1%) had severe trauma (ISS > 11). Sixty-two percent were male. Twenty-nine percent were between the ages of 10 and 14 years, 27% between 5 and 9 years, 16% between 15 and 17 years, 15% between 1 and 4 years, and 13% less than 1 year old. The most common mechanisms of injury were due to motor vehicle traffic (39%), falls (24%), child abuse (8%), and sports (5%). Of those resulting from motor vehicle traffic, 53 (57%) were occupants, 22 (24%) were pedestrians, and 18 (19%) were cyclists. When combining traffic and nontraffic mechanisms, 26 (11% of all severe trauma cases) occurred as a result of cycling incidents. The most severe injury in 65% of patients was to the head and neck body region.
Research efforts and activities to prevent severe pediatric trauma in our region should focus on road safety, protection from head injuries, avoidance of falls, and prevention of child abuse.
PubMed ID
11791045 View in PubMed
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[6 principles of the therapeutic and diagnostic process in severe combined mechanical injury and the characteristics of their realization during the staged treatment of victims].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213090
Source
Vestn Khir Im I I Grek. 1996;155(5):80-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
I A Eriukhin
V G Marchuk
V F Lebedev
V V Boiarintsev
Source
Vestn Khir Im I I Grek. 1996;155(5):80-4
Date
1996
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Emergencies
First Aid
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel
Multiple Trauma - diagnosis - rehabilitation - surgery
Russia
Trauma Centers
Abstract
Great experience with treatment and a comprehensive investigation of the severe combined trauma allowed the authors to choose six basic principles to be followed in diagnosing and treatment of this surgical pathology whose peculiarity is the phenomenon of mutual aggravation of the injuries. Following these principles, especially at surgical hospitals, promotes complete diagnosing, choice of the rational treatment policy in order to avoid medical errors and severe posttraumatic and postshock complications and to improve the outcomes. The authors prove expediency of organization of the multifield specialized centers for treatment of patients with the severe combined traumas.
PubMed ID
9123768 View in PubMed
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A 10-year incidence of acute whiplash injuries after road traffic crashes in a defined population in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122426
Source
PM R. 2012 Oct;4(10):739-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Johan Styrke
Britt-Marie Stålnacke
Per-Olof Bylund
Peter Sojka
Ulf Björnstig
Author Affiliation
Division of Surgery, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, 901 85 Umeå, Sweden. johan.styrke@surgery.umu.se
Source
PM R. 2012 Oct;4(10):739-47
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data - trends
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Automobiles
Bicycling
Catchment Area (Health)
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Humans
Incidence
Insurance Claim Reporting - statistics & numerical data - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Trauma Centers
Whiplash Injuries - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine the annual incidence of acute whiplash injuries after road traffic crashes in a geographic catchment area in Northern Sweden during the period 2000-2009.
Descriptive epidemiology determined by prospectively collected data from a defined population.
The study was conducted at a public hospital in Sweden.
The population of the hospital's catchment area (136,600 inhabitants in 1999 and 144,500 in 2009).
At the emergency department, all injured persons (approximately 11,000 per year) were asked to answer a questionnaire about the injury incident. Data from the medical records also were analyzed. From 2000-2009, 15,506 persons were injured in vehicle crashes. Persons who were subject to an acute neck injury within whiplash-associated disorder grades 1-3 were included. The overall and annual incidences were calculated as incidence. Age, gender, type of injury event, and direction of impact were described. The incidences were compared with national statistics on insurance claims from 2003, 2007, and 2008 to detect changes in the proportions of claims.
The annual incidence of acute whiplash injuries. Secondary outcome measures were types of injury events, age and gender distribution, changes in the proportion of rear-end crashes during 2000-2009, and changes in the proportion of insurance claims during 2003-2008.
During 2000-2009, 3297 cases of acute whiplash injury were encountered. The overall incidence was 235/100,000/year. The average yearly increase in incidence was 1.0%. Women comprised 51.9% and men 48.1% of the injured. Car occupants (86.4%) and bicycle riders (6.1%) were most frequently injured. The proportion of rear-end crashes decreased from 55% to 45% from 2000-2009. The proportion of insurance claims significantly decreased between 2003 and 2008 (P
PubMed ID
22819305 View in PubMed
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25 years or more after spinal cord injury: clinical conditions of individuals in the Florence and Stockholm areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129470
Source
Spinal Cord. 2012 Mar;50(3):243-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
L. Werhagen
S. Aito
L. Tucci
J. Strayer
C. Hultling
Author Affiliation
Karolinska institutet Danderyds Sjukhus, Department of clinical sciences, Division of Rehabilitation Medicine, Danderyds hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. lars.werhagen @ki.se
Source
Spinal Cord. 2012 Mar;50(3):243-6
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ethnic Groups
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Italy
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Spinal Cord Injuries - complications - etiology - therapy
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Retrospective analysis and retrospective follow-up.
Spinal cord injury (SCI) patients have today a nearly normal lifespan. Avoidance of medical complications is key to this end. The aim of the study was to analyse health in individuals surviving 25 years or more after traumatic SCI in Stockholm and Florence, and compare medical complications.
Data from the databases of the Spinal Unit of Florence and from the Spinalis, Stockholm were analysed. Patients included were C2-L 2, American Spinal Cord Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) A-C, and =25 years post traumatic SCI. Patients underwent a thorough neurological and general examination, and were interviewed about medical events during those years. Analysed data include: gender, age at injury, current age, neurological level, AIS, cause of injury, presence of neuropathic pain (NP), and spasticity and medical complications.
A total of 66 Italian patients and 74 Swedish patients were included. The only statistical difference between the groups was cause of injury due to falls was higher in the Florence group (P
PubMed ID
22105457 View in PubMed
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[130 kilometers/hour save time!--Besides there is a shortage of organ donors].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184140
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2003 Jul 14;165(29):2900-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-14-2003

The 1990 Fraser Gurd Lecture: a Canadian trauma registry system--nine years experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226225
Source
J Trauma. 1991 Jun;31(6):856-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1991
Author
C M Burns
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Manitoba Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
J Trauma. 1991 Jun;31(6):856-66
Date
Jun-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Manitoba - epidemiology
Registries
Wounds and injuries - classification - epidemiology
PubMed ID
2056552 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A 5-year series. Injuries in moped and motorcycle accidents].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241814
Source
Lakartidningen. 1983 Jun 15;80(24):2514-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-1983

Abandonment of mandatory jail for impaired drivers in Norway and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11418
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1995 Apr;27(2):151-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1995
Author
H L Ross
H. Klette
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque 87131, USA.
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1995 Apr;27(2):151-7
Date
Apr-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - mortality - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence
Automobile Driving - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Norway
Prisons - legislation & jurisprudence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
In 1988 and 1990, respectively, Norway and Sweden adopted legal reforms including abandonment of mandatory jail sentences for persons driving with BACs above specific limits. Interrupted time-series analysis finds that in both countries traffic deaths diminished simultaneously with the reforms, consistent with the understanding that Scandinavian success in reducing impaired driving does not depend upon mandatory jail.
PubMed ID
7786382 View in PubMed
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Abbreviated injury scale scoring in traffic fatalities: comparison of computerized tomography and autopsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146834
Source
J Trauma. 2010 Jun;68(6):1413-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Peter Mygind Leth
Marlene Ibsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. pleth@health.sdu.dk
Source
J Trauma. 2010 Jun;68(6):1413-6
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abbreviated Injury Scale
Accidents, Traffic - mortality
Autopsy
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Forensic Medicine
Humans
Male
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - radiography
Abstract
The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate the value of postmortem computerized tomography (CT) for Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) scoring and Injury Severity Scoring (ISS) of traffic fatalities.
This is a prospective investigation of a consecutive series of 52 traffic fatalities from Southern Denmark that were CT scanned and autopsied. The AIS and ISS scores based on CT and autopsy (AU) were registered in a computer database and compared. Kappa values for reproducibility of AIS-severity scores and ISS scores were calculated.
On an average, there was a 94% agreement between AU and CT in detecting the presence or absence of lesions in the various anatomic regions, and the severity scores were the same in 90% of all cases (range, 75-100%). When different severity scoring was obtained, CT detected more lesions with a high severity score in the facial skeleton, pelvis, and extremities, whereas AU detected more lesions with high scores in the soft tissues (especially in the aorta), cranium, and ribs. The kappa value for reproducibility of AIS scores confirmed that the agreement between the two methods was good. The lowest kappa values (>0.6) were found for the facial skeleton, cerebellum, meninges, neck organs, lungs, kidneys, and gastrointestinal tract. In these areas, the kappa value provided moderate agreement between CT and AU. For all other areas, there was a substantial agreement between the two methods. The ISS scores obtained by CT and by AU were calculated and were found to be with no or moderate variation in 85%. Rupture of the aorta was often overlooked by CT, resulting in too low ISS scoring.
The most precise postmortem AIS and ISS scorings of traffic fatalities was obtained by a combination of AU and CT. If it is not possible to perform an AU, then CT may be used as an acceptable alternative for AIS scoring. We have identified one important obstacle for postmortem ISS scoring, namely that aorta ruptures are not easily detected by post mortem CT.
PubMed ID
19996793 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Abdominal injuries after blunt trauma]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12141
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Sep 30;110(23):2994-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-1990
Author
A. Nesbakken
F. Naess
K. Solheim
J. Pillgram-Larsen
T. Gerner
J O Stadaas
Author Affiliation
Kirurgisk avdeling, Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Sep 30;110(23):2994-8
Date
Sep-30-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - diagnosis - etiology - surgery
Accidents, Occupational
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Athletic Injuries - diagnosis - etiology - surgery
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergencies
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Laparotomy
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Wounds, Nonpenetrating - diagnosis - etiology - surgery
Abstract
We present a series of 331 patients admitted to hospital in 1980-87 with abdominal injuries after blunt trauma. The patients included 230 males and 101 females. The median age was 29 years. More than half of the patients were injured in traffic accidents. 11% were transferred to our Trauma Center from other hospitals, median five hours after the accident. A doctor-manned helicopter transported 52 patients (18%) directly to our hospital. 70% had extra-abdominal injuries as well. A minimum of 20% were intoxicated by alcohol and/or drugs. Severe injuries (AIS greater than 3) were present in 46%. 168 patients underwent laparotomy, in 56% within two hours of admission. In 27 of the 168 laparotomized patients (16%) no intraabdominal injury was encountered that needed repair.
PubMed ID
2237848 View in PubMed
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1981 records – page 1 of 199.