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865 records – page 1 of 87.

15 years after Chernobyl: new evidence of thyroid cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19395
Source
Lancet. 2001 Dec 8;358(9297):1965-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-8-2001
Author
Y. Shibata
S. Yamashita
V B Masyakin
G D Panasyuk
S. Nagataki
Source
Lancet. 2001 Dec 8;358(9297):1965-6
Date
Dec-8-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Byelarus - epidemiology
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Nuclear Reactors
Population Surveillance
Radioactive fallout
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
The Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident happened on April 26, 1986. We investigated the cause of the striking increase in frequency of thyroid cancer in children who lived within a 150 km radius of Chernobyl and who were born before and after the accident. No thyroid cancer was seen in 9472 children born in 1987-89, whereas one and 31 thyroid cancers were recorded in 2409 children born April 27, 1986, to Dec 31, 1986, and 9720 born Jan 1, 1983, to April 26, 1986, respectively. Short-lived radioactive fallout caused by the Chernobyl accident probably induced thyroid cancer in children living near Chernobyl.
PubMed ID
11747925 View in PubMed
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[15 years after Chernobyl--what have we learned?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19464
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Oct 22;163(43):5955
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-22-2001

[15 years after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19138
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2002 Mar-Apr;42(2):228-33
Publication Type
Article
Author
L A Buldakov
A K Gus'kova
Author Affiliation
State Research Centre-Institute of Biophysics, Russian Ministry of Health, Moscow, 123182 Russia.
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2002 Mar-Apr;42(2):228-33
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Byelarus - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Power Plants
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries - epidemiology
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Time Factors
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
Health effects as a result of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant occurred in 1986 are considered in the paper. Wrong prognosis of the health effects with respect to mortality and morbidity among the population exposed to low radiation doses is shown. Proven increase in thyroid cancer cases among people who were children aged from 0 to 18 at the time of the accident is shown. Linear relationship between thyroid cancer cases and dose to thyroid ranged from 0.2 to 4.0 Gy is considered. An additional absolute risk of thyroid cancer in children varies in the range 1.9-2.6 cases per 10(4) person-year Gy. During the fifteen years following the accident no cases of acute and chronic radiation sickness have been revealed because the population living in contaminated areas received low radiation doses. Also, exposures to low radiation doses did not result in excess of malignant tumors among population. In some cases the outcomes of acute radiation sickness were as follows: radiation damages to the skin, cancer cataracts, development of oncopathology.
PubMed ID
12004624 View in PubMed
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[20-year morpholoogical findings in the study of medical aftereffects of the Chernobyl accident]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82012
Source
Arkh Patol. 2006 Mar-Apr;68(2):3-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lushnikov E F
Source
Arkh Patol. 2006 Mar-Apr;68(2):3-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Accidents, Radiation - mortality
Byelarus
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Power Plants
Radiation Dosage
Russia
Time Factors
Ukraine
Abstract
Presented are the results of morphological studies of radiation sickness, congenital malformations and malignant tumors which have developed in Chemobyl victims. Until now consequences of the accident remain a subject of practical and research medicine. Scope of relevant topical problems the pathologists will have to investigate in the future is discussed.
PubMed ID
16752499 View in PubMed
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131I ablation treatment in young females after the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80419
Source
J Nucl Med. 2006 Oct;47(10):1723-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Travis Curtis C
Stabin Michael G
Author Affiliation
Science Applications International Corporation, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA. Traviscc@icx.net
Source
J Nucl Med. 2006 Oct;47(10):1723-7
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
Child
Female
Humans
Iodine Radioisotopes - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Power Plants
Radiotherapy - adverse effects
Thyroid Neoplasms - radiotherapy
Ukraine
Whole-Body Counting
Abstract
The Chernobyl accident resulted in a number of cases of thyroid cancer in females under the age of 20 y. Many of these individuals were treated with surgical removal of the thyroid gland followed by 131I ablation of residual thyroid tissue. Epidemiologic evidence demonstrates that 131I treatment for thyroid cancer or hyperthyroidism in adult women confers negligible risk of breast cancer. However, comparable data for younger women do not exist. Studies of external radiation exposure indicate that, for radiation exposures of as low as 0.2-0.7 Gy, the risk of breast cancer is greater for infant and adolescent female breast tissues than for adult female breast tissues. METHODS: The effective half-time of 131I measured in athyrotic patients was used together with the OLINDA/EXM computer code to estimate doses to breast tissue in 10-y-old, 15-y-old, and young adult females from ablation treatment. RESULTS: The dose to pediatric and young adult female breast tissue associated with a 5.6-GBq (150 mCi) ablation treatment may range from 0.35 to 0.55 Gy, resulting in a lifetime risk of breast cancer ranging from 2-4 cases per 100 such individuals exposed and a lifetime risk of solid tumors ranging from 8 to 17 solid tumors per 100 such individuals exposed. Administration of multiple ablation treatments, as often occurs with metastases, could result in doses ranging from 0.7 to 1 Gy, with corresponding increases in the lifetime cancer risk. CONCLUSION: These estimates suggest the need for additional research and a possible need for surveillance of young Chernobyl thyroid cancer patients who received 131I ablation treatment.
Notes
Comment In: J Nucl Med. 2006 Oct;47(10):1563-417015887
Erratum In: J Nucl Med. 2007 Jan;48(1):7
PubMed ID
17015910 View in PubMed
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131I content in the human thyroid estimated from direct measurements of the inhabitants of Russian areas contaminated due to the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30700
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2003;105(1-4):623-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
A A Bratilova
I A Zvonova
M I Balonov
N G Shishkanov
V I Trushin
M. Hoshi
Author Affiliation
Institute of Radiation Hygiene, Mira st. 8, 197136, St Petersburg, Russia. bratilov@comset.net
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2003;105(1-4):623-6
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Computer simulation
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Iodine Radioisotopes - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Male
Metabolic Clearance Rate
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Power Plants
Radiation Dosage
Radioactive fallout - analysis
Radiometry - methods
Russia
Thyroid Gland - metabolism
Ukraine
Abstract
The method of processing and the results of measurements of 131I content in the thyroids of Russian people performed in May-June 1986 are presented. The contribution of radiation from Cs radionuclides in the human body was taken into account in the processing of measurement data with an SRP-68-01 device. The greatest individual 131I content was found in the thyroids of inhabitants of the Bryansk region, up to 250-350 kBq, and in the Tula and Orel regions, up to 100 kBq. The average 131I thyroid activity in the middle of May 1986 reached 80 kBq for inhabitants of some settlements in the Bryansk region, 5-8 kBq in the Tula region and 5 kBq in the Orel region.
PubMed ID
14527038 View in PubMed
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131I dose-dependent thyroid autoimmune disorders in children living around Chernobyl.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34164
Source
Clin Immunol Immunopathol. 1997 Sep;84(3):251-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
E V Vykhovanets
V P Chernyshov
I I Slukvin
Y G Antipkin
A N Vasyuk
H F Klimenko
K W Strauss
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Immunology, Institute of Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kiev, Ukraine.
Source
Clin Immunol Immunopathol. 1997 Sep;84(3):251-9
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Autoantibodies - blood
Autoimmune Diseases - etiology
Child
Humans
Iodine Radioisotopes - adverse effects
Lymphocyte Count
Lymphocyte Subsets - chemistry - immunology
Radioactive fallout
Radioactive Pollutants - adverse effects
Thyroglobulin - immunology
Thyroid Diseases - immunology
Thyroid Gland - ultrasonography
Thyroid Hormones - blood
Thyrotropin - blood
Ukraine
Abstract
We assessed the major lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood, thyroid ultrasonography, levels of serum autoantibodies to thyroglobulin (AbTg), thyroid hormones, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in 53 children without any chronic diseases living continuously around Chernobyl. The subjects ranged in age from 7 to 14 years and had different doses of 131I to their thyroid. Healthy children living on noncontaminated areas were assessed as controls. The majority of children with doses of 131I had normal levels of thyroid hormones. However, the percentages of positive sera for AbTg, TSH levels, ultrasonographic thyroid abnormalities, and abnormal echogenicity were significantly higher in children with doses of 131I than in controls. The dose of 131I to thyroid correlated positively with serum AbTg levels, percentage of CD3+CD4+ cells, and CD3+CD4+/CD3+CD8+ cell ratio and negatively with number of CD3+CD8+ and CD3-/CD16, CD56+ cells. Thus, our study demonstrates an association between dose of 131I and autoimmune thyroid disorders in this population of children.
PubMed ID
9281383 View in PubMed
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137Cs concentration among children in areas contaminated with radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl accident: Mogilev and Gomel Oblasts, Belarus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35314
Source
Health Phys. 1995 May;68(5):733-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1995
Author
W S Watson
Source
Health Phys. 1995 May;68(5):733-5
Date
May-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Body Burden
Byelarus
Cesium Radioisotopes - adverse effects - analysis
Child
Humans
Power Plants
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects - analysis
Ukraine
Notes
Comment On: Health Phys. 1994 Sep;67(3):272-58056594
Comment In: Health Phys. 1995 Dec;69(6):9877493819
PubMed ID
7730075 View in PubMed
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137Cs urinary excretion by northwestern Italians ten years after the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72690
Source
Health Phys. 1997 Sep;73(3):498-501
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
R. Ropolo
P. Cesana
Author Affiliation
Servizio di Fisica Sanitaria, A.O. San Giovanni Battista, Molinette Hospital, Torino, Italy.
Source
Health Phys. 1997 Sep;73(3):498-501
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adult
Body Burden
Cesium Radioisotopes - urine
Female
Food contamination, radioactive
Health Physics
Humans
Italy
Male
Middle Aged
Radiation Dosage
Time Factors
Ukraine
Abstract
Measurements of 137Cs contamination in the urine of 37 individuals were performed in 1995 and 1996 in order to evaluate the 137Cs daily urinary excretion in the northwestern italian people ten years from the Chernobyl accident. The difference between the average 137Cs daily urinary excretion assessed for 1995 and for 1996 was not statistically significant. Using the values of urine contamination, an estimate of 0.2 Bq(-1) of mean ingested activity was obtained. A mean committed effective dose of about 1 microSv was determined as due to the 137Cs ingestion during 1 y at 10 y after the accident. Such a dose is lower by a factor of 10(3) than the corresponding value for the population of North Italy in the first year following the Chernobyl accident.
PubMed ID
9287092 View in PubMed
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865 records – page 1 of 87.