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56 records – page 1 of 6.

Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Sep 25;151(39):2519-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-1989
Author
B E Lindblad
C J Terkelsen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Sep 25;151(39):2519-20
Date
Sep-25-1989
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Poisoning - epidemiology - etiology
Prospective Studies
Abstract
During a period of one year, a total of 79 cases of accidental poisoning were registered prospectively in the County Hospital in Aarhus and the City Hospital in Randers. The female/male ratio was 1/1.5. The incidence in children aged 0-14 years of age was 13 per 10,000. In Denmark as a whole, a total of 1,300 cases of accidental poisoning were estimated to occur during a period of one year. Sixty-four (81%) of the accidents occurred in small children aged 0-4 years. Twenty-five patients (32%) were hospitalized. The average duration of hospitalization was 2.4 days (1-4 days) and 84% of the inpatients were aged 0-4 years. The survey revealed that 27 case of accidental poisoning were due to medicine, 20 to organic solvents, eight to chemicals, 22 to poison and two to asphyxiation. It is concluded that the special legal regulations about packing and labelling are not sufficient when storage of the potential poison is not safe enough.
PubMed ID
2800030 View in PubMed
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[Accidents among the Norwegian population. Interview by Marit Fonn].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229074
Source
J Sykepleien. 1990 May 10;78(8):16-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-1990

[Accidents caused by inflatable bouncers in 0-19 year-olds in Denmark in 1993]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34830
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Apr 15;158(16):2251-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1996
Author
K. Kirketerp-Møller
N. Balslev
M. Lohmann
Author Affiliation
Sundhedsstyrelsen, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Apr 15;158(16):2251-3
Date
Apr-15-1996
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Play and Playthings
Retrospective Studies
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
The paper describes the epidemiology of accidents caused by inflatable bouncers. The estimated number of bouncers and bouncing castles in DK was 300-350 in 1993. The data were extracted from the Danish part of the EHLASS project ("the European Home and Leisure Accident Surveillance System). The project registers injuries in five Danish casualty wards, covering a total uptake area of 14.2% of the Danish population. In 1993, there were 91 injuries caused by inflatable bouncers, 37% of them in boys, and 63% in girls. Seventy-nine percent of the injuries were caused by falling, 19% by contact with an object or another person and 2% stress injuries. The type of injury were: bruises 42%, fractures 31%, distorsions 23%, and tendon/muscle strains 3%. The location of the fractures were: one in the spine, two in the clavicle, all other (25) were located in the limbs. Four patients had to be admitted for further observation or treatment. The average cost per injury was 839 dKr., or aprox 150 US$. It does not seem necessary to take special precautions or make restrictions in the use of this new playground article.
PubMed ID
8650798 View in PubMed
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Are national injury prevention and research efforts matching the distribution of injuries across sectors?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268589
Source
Inj Prev. 2015 Apr;21(e1):e113-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Henrik Jaldell
Linda Ryen
Björn Sund
Ragnar Andersson
Source
Inj Prev. 2015 Apr;21(e1):e113-5
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident Prevention - economics
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Home - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Financing, Government - statistics & numerical data
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Leisure Activities
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - economics - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
In 2011, 88% of all unintentional injury fatalities occurred in home and leisure environments in Sweden, while transportation fatalities accounted for 10% and work/school injuries for 2%. The corresponding proportions among non-fatal injuries were 75, 12 and 13%, respectively. However, 83% of the national governmental expenditure on unintentional injury prevention in 2011 was allocated to transportation safety, 7% to home and leisure, and 10% to the work sector including schools. Likewise, around 85% of the governmental research budget aimed for unintentional injury research was allocated to the transportation sector, 9% to home and leisure environments, and 6% to the work and school sector. Our results reveal a striking lack of correspondence between problem profile and governmental countermeasures.
PubMed ID
24599902 View in PubMed
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Associations between falls and general health, nutrition, dental health and medication use in Swedish home-dwelling people aged 75 years and over.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279840
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2015 Nov;23(6):594-604
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Edit Fonad
Tarja-Brita Robins Wahlin
Ann-Marie Rydholm Hedman
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2015 Nov;23(6):594-604
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Home - statistics & numerical data
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Appetite
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Nutritional Status
Oral Health - statistics & numerical data
Polypharmacy
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
The vast majority of elderly people in Sweden live in private homes in their communities for as long as possible. Poor health and a high risk of falls are very common among this group. This cross-sectional study investigates the association between falls and general health, appetite, dental health, and the use of multiple medications among home-dwelling men and women aged = 75 years. Data were collected between October 2008 and March 2009 using a postal questionnaire. A total of 1243 people participated in the questionnaire survey (74% response rate), of which 1193 were included in the analysis. The majority of participants were women (n = 738, 62%). Falls in the previous 12-month period were reported by 434 (36%) participants. Most fallers (n = 276, 64%) were women. The majority of the fallers lived in a flat (n = 250, 58%). Poor health (aOR: 1.61; CI: 1.34-1.95), poor dental health (aOR: 1.22; CI: 1.07-1.39) and the use of four or more types of medication daily (aOR: 1.13; CI: 1.03-1.25) were significantly associated with falls in all participants. Poor dental health was found irrespectively of living in a flat (aOR: 1.23; CI: 1.04-1.46) or living in a house (aOR: 1.28; CI: 1.02-1.61), and both were significantly associated with falls. The use of more than four different types of medication daily (aOR: 1.25; CI: 1.11-1.41) was associated with falls for those living in a flat. The results highlight that falls are associated with poor general health, poor dental health and the use of four or more types of medication daily. Health professionals should provide health promotion education and investigate dental health and risk factors for oral disease. Likewise, medical and clinical practices of physicians and community care nurses should include assessing the risk of falling, and treatment that predisposes falls.
PubMed ID
25676026 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2011 Jan 7;131(1):20-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-7-2011
Author
Christina Brudvik
Eli Leirdal Hoem
Brita Luggenes
Hallvard Vindenes
Author Affiliation
Institutt for kirurgiske fag, Universitetet i Bergen, Bergen Legevakt, Postboks 4500, 5838 Bergen, Norway. christina.brudvik@kir.uib.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2011 Jan 7;131(1):20-3
Date
Jan-7-2011
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Burns - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology - therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Norway - epidemiology - ethnology
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
Burn injuries in children may cause permanent harm. This study reports data on incidence, injury mechanisms and products that cause burn injuries (in the period 01.01.07-31.12.07) and compares findings with those from previous studies (in 1989 and 1998).
Semi-structured questionnaires were filled in by patients or next-of-kin and health workers at Bergen Accident and Emergency Department, casualty centres in three municipalities in western Norway (Fana, Åsane and Loddefjord) and at the National Burns Centre, Haukeland University Hospital. Missing data were retrieved retrospectively from medical records.
We recorded 142 children with burn injuries; 35% were boys under two years of age. The annual incidence was the same as earlier; 6.6 per 1,000 under five years and 3.1 per 1,000 children under 15 years living in the community of Bergen. Contact injuries and scalds were most common and were caused by contact with ovens, stoves and hot food or liquids. Most children (93%) had less severe burns; 6% (9) were hospitalized (four of them had a non-western background). Almost 95% were given first aid by cooling.
Children under two years, especially boys, are most at risk of burn injuries. Ovens were the cause more often now than before. The incidence has been the same the last 20 years and is the same as that in Trondheim ten years ago. The fact that the small city, Harstad, (northern Norway) attained substantially less injuries after the introduction of preventive actions indicates that such actions are needed to reduce the number of burn injuries among children.
PubMed ID
21233882 View in PubMed
Less detail

Burn injuries in small children, a population-based study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29247
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2006 Feb;15(2):129-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Anna Carlsson
Giggi Udén
Anders Håkansson
Elisabeth Dejin Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Doctoral student, Department of Nursing, School of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden. anna.carlsson@hs.mah.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2006 Feb;15(2):129-34
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home - statistics & numerical data
Age Distribution
Burns - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Causality
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Extremities - injuries
Female
Health services needs and demand
Hospitals, University - utilization
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Injury Severity Score
Male
Parents - education
Population Surveillance
Primary Health Care - utilization
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES. The aim of this study was to describe characteristics in burn injuries in children (zero to six years old), consulting primary care and hospital-based care in Malmö, Sweden. Burn-injured children consulting the University Hospital or the 21 Health Centres, during year 1998 and year 2002, were included. BACKGROUND. Epidemiological studies of burns in children have mostly been hospital-based and the cases that never reached the hospital have been excluded. DESIGN. The study had a retroperspective design with data collected from medical records. METHODS. Chi-squared test was used to analyse differences in nominal data and cross tables were used to analyse the proportions between the characteristics of the injuries and sex, age and nationality. RESULTS. The burn-injured children were 148 and 80% of those were scalds, caused by hot liquid (71%) or hot food (29%). The greatest number was boys between one and two years old. Children to foreign born parents were more frequently affected and the extent of the injuries often larger. Almost all the accidents (96%) occurred in home environment, while a family member was next to the child. The Health Centres received more often children affected on hand/arm and by causes like hot food than the University Hospital. CONCLUSIONS. Our data demonstrate the importance of developing a programme for the prevention of paediatric scalds with education of family members to be aware of the danger. With present study the knowledge about the occurrence of injuries in scald accidents in children has become deeper. This knowledge may contribute to more individual adept child accident prevention programme, to use in the child health care.
PubMed ID
16422729 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Burns are frequent among immigrant children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34599
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Oct 30;93(44):3905-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1996
Author
H. Svensson
S. Kalhor
A. Larsson
Author Affiliation
plastikkirurgiska kliniken, Universitets-sjukhuset MAS, Malmö.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Oct 30;93(44):3905-6
Date
Oct-30-1996
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home - statistics & numerical data
Burns - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Emigration and Immigration
Humans
Infant
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology - ethnology
PubMed ID
8965578 View in PubMed
Less detail

Correlations between traffic, occupational, sports, and home accidents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210200
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1997 Jan;29(1):33-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
S. Salminen
M. Heiskanen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Department of Occupational Safety, Vantaa, Finland. ssal@occuphealth.fi
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1997 Jan;29(1):33-6
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident Proneness
Accidents, Home - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Retrospective Studies
Risk-Taking
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the correlations between accidents in traffic, at work, at home, and during sports and leisure time. The study is based on three independent but similar data sets (in 1980 n = 9598, in 1988 n = 13,762, and in 1993 n = 4275) representative of all Finns over 14 years of age. The subjects were asked in a telephone interview to report all accidents in which they had been involved in the previous 12 months. The correlations between different kinds of accidents were low (the highest r = 0.05) although there were many significant correlations. The highest correlations were found between traffic accidents, accidents at work, and sports injuries.
PubMed ID
9110038 View in PubMed
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56 records – page 1 of 6.