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77 records – page 1 of 8.

[A campaign against home accidents--accident prevention efforts in the communities].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228180
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Oct 30;110(26):3387-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1990
Author
F. Thuen
K I Klepp
R. Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
Nasjonalforeningens HEMIL-senter, Universitetet i Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Oct 30;110(26):3387-90
Date
Oct-30-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidents, Home - prevention & control
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Norway
Primary prevention - methods
Abstract
A nation-wide campaign aimed at preventing accidents in the home is being implemented in Norway. 95% of the municipalities acknowledge having received information material from the campaign, 33% report having established accident prevention committees, and 26% report having introduced preventive measures as a result of this national campaign. The study indicates that accidents are not recognized as yet as a major health problem in many municipalities. Identification of accidents as a health problem seems to be an important factor in the preventive efforts. To enhance further accident prevention efforts it seems important to increase awareness of accident as a health problem, and to increase the involvement of key personnel within the community.
PubMed ID
2256065 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Aug 10;110(18):2345-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-1990
Author
K. Sommerfelt
H. Vogt
Author Affiliation
Barneklinikken Haukeland sykehus, Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Aug 10;110(18):2345-8
Date
Aug-10-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Poisoning - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
A retrospective study was carried out among children admitted to the Pediatric Clinic, Haukeland Hospital, from 1958 until 1986 for accidental poisoning. Drugs was the most frequent poisoning agent (49%), followed by household agents (22%), different agents (20%) and plants/mushrooms (9%). 89% of the children were under five years of age, 57% were boys. 20% stayed more than one day in the hospital. Very serious poisonings involving admission for more than 14 days were most frequently seen after intake of drugs. The number of admissions was doubled from 1966-70 to 1981-85. Most of the increase referred to poisoning from plants, tobacco and hydrocarbon products. The greatest increase was found for admissions lasting less than two days. Most of the potentially serious poisonings in our study were caused by agents that, by American or British law, it would have been illegal to sell without special child-resistant packaging. It is strongly advised that a similar law be passed in Norway.
PubMed ID
2218987 View in PubMed
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Accident prevention activities in the Norwegian municipalities: the local response to a nationwide campaign.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36240
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1993 Jun;21(2):129-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
F. Thuen
J G Maeland
Author Affiliation
Research Center for Health Promotion, University of Bergen.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1993 Jun;21(2):129-34
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home - prevention & control
Adult
Child
Consumer Participation - trends
Health Education - trends
Health Plan Implementation
Health Promotion - trends
Humans
Norway
Patient care team
Abstract
The Norwegian "Campaign Against Home Accidents" was launched nationwide during 1988 to 1991, with the goal of reducing the incidence of home accidents by 20%. The aim of the campaign was to urge primarily the municipal health services to form local accident prevention groups and to implement local measures for prevention of home accidents. On the basis of two surveys, after one year and at the end of the national campaign, an evaluation was carried out concerning the participation of the municipal health services in the campaign and the impact of the campaign on local accident prevention activities. The results indicate that the national campaign engaged the majority of the municipalities and stimulated local accident prevention work to some extent. Most local activities were health education measures, whereas environmental intervention were less commonly reported. Involvement in the campaign was the variable most related to level of accident prevention activities at the end of the campaign period. However, the relationship was only modest. Restricted economical resources, too little emphasis on environmental change, lack of political involvement and insufficient use of coalition partners at the community level are suggested as the major explanations for the limited effect of the campaign.
PubMed ID
8367680 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1987 Sep 7;149(37):2487-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-7-1987
Author
H R Jørgensen
C F Larsen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1987 Sep 7;149(37):2487-8
Date
Sep-7-1987
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home - prevention & control
Denmark
Humans
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
PubMed ID
3450071 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1987 Sep 7;149(37):2484-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-7-1987
Author
H R Jørgensen
C F Larsen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1987 Sep 7;149(37):2484-5
Date
Sep-7-1987
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home - prevention & control
Denmark
Female
Finger Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
PubMed ID
3450069 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1987 Sep 7;149(37):2485-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-7-1987
Author
H R Jørgensen
C F Larsen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1987 Sep 7;149(37):2485-6
Date
Sep-7-1987
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home - prevention & control
Denmark
Humans
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
PubMed ID
3450070 View in PubMed
Less detail

Advancing our understanding of sibling supervision and injury risk for young children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107263
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Nov;96:208-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Barbara A Morrongiello
Stacey L Schell
Bethany Keleher
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Guelph, Canada N1G 2W1. Electronic address: bmorrong@uoguelph.ca.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Nov;96:208-13
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home - prevention & control
Canada
Caregivers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Male
Risk assessment
Sibling Relations
Siblings - psychology
Video Recording
Wounds and injuries - prevention & control
Abstract
Sibling supervision has been shown to increase the risk of supervisee's unintentional injury in the home. Both poorer supervision by the older sibling and noncompliance by the younger sibling have been shown to contribute to this risk. Previous studies have shown that informing older siblings that they are responsible for the behavior of their younger sibling improves their supervision. The present study, conducted in Canada, examined whether informing both children the older child is in charge would improve both older sibling supervisory practices and compliance by the younger child. Younger and older siblings were initially placed in a room containing contrived hazards, and their interactions were unobtrusively recorded. In a second contrived hazards room, both children were then informed that the older sibling was in charge, and the supervisor was privately told not to let the supervisee touch hazardous objects. Results revealed that sibling supervisors showed improved supervision but supervisee behavior did not vary across conditions. Implications for injury prevention and future research directions are discussed.
PubMed ID
24034969 View in PubMed
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77 records – page 1 of 8.