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A 4-year review of severe pediatric trauma in eastern Ontario: a descriptive analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191929
Source
J Trauma. 2002 Jan;52(1):8-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
Martin H Osmond
Maureen Brennan-Barnes
Allyson L Shephard
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. osmond@cheo.on.ca
Source
J Trauma. 2002 Jan;52(1):8-12
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Child Abuse - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Trauma Centers - statistics & numerical data
Trauma Severity Indices
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The objective of this study was to describe a population of children admitted to a tertiary care pediatric hospital with severe trauma to identify key areas for injury prevention research, and programming.
Retrospective chart review conducted on all children 0-17 years admitted to the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) between April 1, 1996, and March 31, 2000, following acute trauma. Each record was reviewed and assigned an ISS using the AIS 1990 revision. All cases with an ISS > 11 were included in the study.
There were 2610 trauma cases admitted to CHEO over the study period. Of these, 237 (9.1%) had severe trauma (ISS > 11). Sixty-two percent were male. Twenty-nine percent were between the ages of 10 and 14 years, 27% between 5 and 9 years, 16% between 15 and 17 years, 15% between 1 and 4 years, and 13% less than 1 year old. The most common mechanisms of injury were due to motor vehicle traffic (39%), falls (24%), child abuse (8%), and sports (5%). Of those resulting from motor vehicle traffic, 53 (57%) were occupants, 22 (24%) were pedestrians, and 18 (19%) were cyclists. When combining traffic and nontraffic mechanisms, 26 (11% of all severe trauma cases) occurred as a result of cycling incidents. The most severe injury in 65% of patients was to the head and neck body region.
Research efforts and activities to prevent severe pediatric trauma in our region should focus on road safety, protection from head injuries, avoidance of falls, and prevention of child abuse.
PubMed ID
11791045 View in PubMed
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2010 clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis in Canada: summary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140116
Source
CMAJ. 2010 Nov 23;182(17):1864-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-23-2010
Author
Alexandra Papaioannou
Suzanne Morin
Angela M Cheung
Stephanie Atkinson
Jacques P Brown
Sidney Feldman
David A Hanley
Anthony Hodsman
Sophie A Jamal
Stephanie M Kaiser
Brent Kvern
Kerry Siminoski
William D Leslie
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. papaioannou@hhsc.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2010 Nov 23;182(17):1864-73
Date
Nov-23-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Age Factors
Bone Density
Bone Density Conservation Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Calcium - therapeutic use
Canada
Dietary Supplements
Exercise Therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - diagnosis - therapy
Osteoporotic Fractures - prevention & control
Risk factors
Vitamin D - therapeutic use
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 2010 Nov 23;182(17):1829-3020940235
PubMed ID
20940232 View in PubMed
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Access to bathtub grab bars: evidence of a policy gap.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167317
Source
Can J Aging. 2006;25(3):295-304
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Nancy Edwards
Nicholas Birkett
Rama Nair
Maureen Murphy
Ginette Roberge
Donna Lockett
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, K1H 8M5, Canada. nancy.edwards@uottawa.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2006;25(3):295-304
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Baths - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Housing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Logistic Models
Public Housing - statistics & numerical data
Self-Help Devices - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This paper examines access to bathtub grab bars in privately and publicly owned apartment buildings and explores the profile of seniors who have access to bathtub grab bars. Results indicate that bathtub grab bars were significantly more prevalent in apartments that were publicly owned (91.3%) as compared to privately owned (37.8%) (p
PubMed ID
17001590 View in PubMed
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[Accidental falls among the elderly--can anything be done for this problem?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222883
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Oct 19;154(43):2949
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-19-1992
Author
A. Poulstrup
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Oct 19;154(43):2949
Date
Oct-19-1992
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Notes
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Jan 4;155(1):43-48421851
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Jan 4;155(1):438421850
PubMed ID
1462380 View in PubMed
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Accidental falls and related fractures in 65-74 year olds: a retrospective study of 332 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198241
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 2000 Apr;71(2):175-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
E. Nordell
G B Jarnlo
C. Jetsén
L. Nordström
K G Thorngren
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics, Lund University Hospital, Sweden. eva.nordell@ort.lu.se
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 2000 Apr;71(2):175-9
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Activities of Daily Living
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Documentation
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Male
Population Surveillance
Postural Balance
Referral and Consultation
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We investigated, by studying medical records, background factors and consequences of accidental falls of patients 65-74 years who attended the Department of Orthopedics' emergency clinic in Lund. We also assessed possible prevention measures. Fractures occurred in three quarters of the registered falls. Women were more prone to sustain fractures than men. Forearm fractures were commonest among women while hip fractures were commonest among men. One third of the patients were admitted to an orthopedic ward because of the fall. The patients who were less healthy had sustained fractures oftener and also needed more hospital care. Information regarding risk factors for falls and fractures were often missing in the patients' medical records. Impaired walking and balance, and medication increased the risk of falls. Such patients constitute a high risk group for future falls and fractures. A newly developed instrument is suggested as a routine in the emergency department to increase the awareness of risk factors for falls in the elderly. Satisfactory documentation is a prerequisite for further treatment and referrals to prevent falls and fractures.
PubMed ID
10852324 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Aug 21;165(4):468
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-21-2001
Author
E. Weir
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Aug 21;165(4):468
Date
Aug-21-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Male
Notes
Cites: J Pediatr Surg. 1999 Jul;34(7):1060-310442588
Cites: J Pediatr Orthop. 2000 Mar-Apr;20(2):197-20210739282
Cites: Surg Clin North Am. 1991 Apr;71(2):331-442003254
PubMed ID
11531065 View in PubMed
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[Accidental falls in nursing homes. A study of the extent and circumstances of accidental falls in nursing homes]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8144
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Oct 19;154(43):2950-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-19-1992
Author
B. Viskum
Author Affiliation
Embedslaegeinstitutionen for Vejle Amt.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Oct 19;154(43):2950-5
Date
Oct-19-1992
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Homes for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Accidental falls in 54 nursing homes with 2228 elderly residents aged 65 years and over were registered during a period of seven months. During the seven months, 512 of the elderly residents fell on a total of 934 occasions. Forty-two fractures of the neck of the femur occurred. The risk of falls for elderly residents of nursing homes is very high, but the majority of falls do not result in permanent damage. In this investigation, no differences could be demonstrated between staff groups or circumstances concerning falls with and without resultant damage. All falls should be regarded as warnings and result in detailed investigation of the circumstances of the fall in view of prophylactic measures. Accidental falls are caused by a complex interaction between a series of health, therapy, furnishing and attitudes. Various circumstances are emphasized in this investigation which are connected with an increased risk of falling, e.g. vertigo, problems of balance, certain aids and activities in connection with toileting.
PubMed ID
1462381 View in PubMed
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[Accidental falls in nursing homes. A study on the role of drugs in accidental falls in nursing homes].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222882
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Oct 19;154(43):2955-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-19-1992
Author
B. Viskum
S. Juul
Author Affiliation
Embedslaegeinstitutionen for Vejle Amt.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Oct 19;154(43):2955-8
Date
Oct-19-1992
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Antiparkinson Agents - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diuretics - adverse effects
Drug Utilization
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Female
Homes for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - adverse effects
Male
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Psychotropic Drugs - adverse effects
Risk factors
Abstract
The drug consumptions of 2228 residents in nursing homes aged 65 years and over were investigated and related to accidental falls during a period of seven months. 95% of the residents received treatment with one or more drugs and 33% with six or more drugs. The risk of accidental falls was significantly increased in persons receiving hypnotics, psychomarmaca and anti-Parkinson medicine. Individuals receiving diuretics, particularly thiazides, were less at risk for accidental falls. This investigation revealed an increased risk of falls particularly when residents were receiving treatment with a short-term hypnotic (Triazolam). It is recommended that this finding should be investigated further.
PubMed ID
1462382 View in PubMed
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Advancing our understanding of mothers' safety rules for school-age children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128871
Source
Can J Public Health. 2011 Nov-Dec;102(6):455-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Barbara A Morrongiello
Alexa Kane
Melissa Bell
Author Affiliation
Psychology Department, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1. bmorrong@uoguelph.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2011 Nov-Dec;102(6):455-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident Prevention - methods
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Analysis of Variance
Child
Child Care - methods - standards
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mother-Child Relations
Observation
Ontario
Safety
Abstract
Teaching safety rules is a common way parents attempt to moderate injury risk for elementary-school children, but few studies have examined the nature of this teaching. The present study explored whether mothers' safety rules varied with type of injury (falls, poisoning, burns and cuts), the nature of these teaching strategies about rules, and how effective these rules were to moderate children's risk behaviour when in a setting having 'contrived' hazards that were targeted by these rules.
Mothers completed an interview about safety rules, and children's behaviour was unobtrusively observed in a 'contrived hazards' situation having hazards relevant to falls, poisoning, burns and cuts.
Mothers had significantly fewer rules addressing fall risks than other types of injuries, and fall-related rules were highly hazard-specific in nature, rather than aimed at teaching general principles for appraising fall risks. For all types of injuries except falls, children interacted with fewer hazards for which there were rules.
Rules can have preventive properties that can serve to moderate children's interacting with hazards when alone, but this seems to vary depending on the type of rule that has been taught. Given that falls are a leading cause of injury hospitalization for children and that parents are not emphasizing fall prevention as much as other types of injuries, efforts should be extended to promote parents' shifting their prevention approaches to better address this particular injury risk.
PubMed ID
22164558 View in PubMed
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[Age-specific peculiarities of manifestations of a craniocerebral injury in children and adolescents with a combined blunt trauma].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131880
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 2011 May-Jun;54(3):23-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
V M Karavaev
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 2011 May-Jun;54(3):23-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Forensic Pathology
Head Injuries, Closed - epidemiology - pathology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Multiple Trauma - epidemiology - pathology
Population Surveillance
Russia - epidemiology
Trauma Severity Indices
Abstract
This study was designed to estimate the frequency of head injuries and selected manifestations of craniocerebral traumas in children and adolescents with a fatal combined blunt trauma. It is included 289 cases of death from a combined blunt trauma (101 original observations and data of 188 archival documents). The victims were categorized into 3 age groups. One group was comprised of cases from 0 to 3 years of life, group 2 included children aged from 4 to 11 years, and group 3 those at the age from 12 to 18 years. The age was shown to significantly influence both the frequency of head injuries and their severity. The maximum values of the two variables were recorded in the youngest age group. The frequency of head injuries and the number of selected manifestations of the craniocerebral trauma decreased with age.
PubMed ID
21866843 View in PubMed
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266 records – page 1 of 27.