Skip header and navigation

Refine By

752 records – page 1 of 76.

A 4-year review of severe pediatric trauma in eastern Ontario: a descriptive analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191929
Source
J Trauma. 2002 Jan;52(1):8-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
Martin H Osmond
Maureen Brennan-Barnes
Allyson L Shephard
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. osmond@cheo.on.ca
Source
J Trauma. 2002 Jan;52(1):8-12
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Child Abuse - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Trauma Centers - statistics & numerical data
Trauma Severity Indices
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The objective of this study was to describe a population of children admitted to a tertiary care pediatric hospital with severe trauma to identify key areas for injury prevention research, and programming.
Retrospective chart review conducted on all children 0-17 years admitted to the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) between April 1, 1996, and March 31, 2000, following acute trauma. Each record was reviewed and assigned an ISS using the AIS 1990 revision. All cases with an ISS > 11 were included in the study.
There were 2610 trauma cases admitted to CHEO over the study period. Of these, 237 (9.1%) had severe trauma (ISS > 11). Sixty-two percent were male. Twenty-nine percent were between the ages of 10 and 14 years, 27% between 5 and 9 years, 16% between 15 and 17 years, 15% between 1 and 4 years, and 13% less than 1 year old. The most common mechanisms of injury were due to motor vehicle traffic (39%), falls (24%), child abuse (8%), and sports (5%). Of those resulting from motor vehicle traffic, 53 (57%) were occupants, 22 (24%) were pedestrians, and 18 (19%) were cyclists. When combining traffic and nontraffic mechanisms, 26 (11% of all severe trauma cases) occurred as a result of cycling incidents. The most severe injury in 65% of patients was to the head and neck body region.
Research efforts and activities to prevent severe pediatric trauma in our region should focus on road safety, protection from head injuries, avoidance of falls, and prevention of child abuse.
PubMed ID
11791045 View in PubMed
Less detail

25 years or more after spinal cord injury: clinical conditions of individuals in the Florence and Stockholm areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129470
Source
Spinal Cord. 2012 Mar;50(3):243-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
L. Werhagen
S. Aito
L. Tucci
J. Strayer
C. Hultling
Author Affiliation
Karolinska institutet Danderyds Sjukhus, Department of clinical sciences, Division of Rehabilitation Medicine, Danderyds hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. lars.werhagen @ki.se
Source
Spinal Cord. 2012 Mar;50(3):243-6
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ethnic Groups
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Italy
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Spinal Cord Injuries - complications - etiology - therapy
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Retrospective analysis and retrospective follow-up.
Spinal cord injury (SCI) patients have today a nearly normal lifespan. Avoidance of medical complications is key to this end. The aim of the study was to analyse health in individuals surviving 25 years or more after traumatic SCI in Stockholm and Florence, and compare medical complications.
Data from the databases of the Spinal Unit of Florence and from the Spinalis, Stockholm were analysed. Patients included were C2-L 2, American Spinal Cord Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) A-C, and =25 years post traumatic SCI. Patients underwent a thorough neurological and general examination, and were interviewed about medical events during those years. Analysed data include: gender, age at injury, current age, neurological level, AIS, cause of injury, presence of neuropathic pain (NP), and spasticity and medical complications.
A total of 66 Italian patients and 74 Swedish patients were included. The only statistical difference between the groups was cause of injury due to falls was higher in the Florence group (P
PubMed ID
22105457 View in PubMed
Less detail

2010 clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis in Canada: summary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140116
Source
CMAJ. 2010 Nov 23;182(17):1864-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-23-2010
Author
Alexandra Papaioannou
Suzanne Morin
Angela M Cheung
Stephanie Atkinson
Jacques P Brown
Sidney Feldman
David A Hanley
Anthony Hodsman
Sophie A Jamal
Stephanie M Kaiser
Brent Kvern
Kerry Siminoski
William D Leslie
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. papaioannou@hhsc.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2010 Nov 23;182(17):1864-73
Date
Nov-23-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Age Factors
Bone Density
Bone Density Conservation Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Calcium - therapeutic use
Canada
Dietary Supplements
Exercise Therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - diagnosis - therapy
Osteoporotic Fractures - prevention & control
Risk factors
Vitamin D - therapeutic use
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 2007 Aug 25;370(9588):657-6617720017
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2007 Nov;18(11):1463-7217726622
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2007 Oct;22(10):1479-9117663640
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2007 Oct 22;167(19):2110-517954806
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Nov 1;357(18):1799-80917878149
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2008 Jan;19(1):79-8617641811
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2008 Jan;139(1):32-4018167382
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2009 Feb;24(2):353-6019514851
Cites: Clin Biochem. 2009 Jul;42(10-11):929-4219362543
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Aug 20;361(8):756-6519671655
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Aug 20;361(8):745-5519671656
Cites: CMAJ. 2009 Sep 1;181(5):265-7119654194
Cites: Clin Rehabil. 2009 Oct;23(10):888-9619717503
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2009 Nov;24(11):1800-719419321
Cites: CMAJ. 2009 Nov 24;181(11):815-2019841053
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2008 Mar;19(3):365-7217938986
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2008 Feb 5;148(3):197-21318087050
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2008 Apr;19(4):581-717924051
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2008 Apr;19(4):437-4718292976
Cites: JAMA. 2008 Mar 26;299(12):1468-7018364489
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2008 Aug;19(8):1119-2318286218
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2008 Oct;19(10):1363-818546030
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2000;(2):CD00198310796457
Cites: JAMA. 2001 Jan 17;285(3):320-311176842
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2001;12(4):271-811420776
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2002 Mar;87(3):985-9211889149
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2008 Oct;19(10):1395-40818751937
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2008 Sep 16;149(6):404-1518794560
Cites: J Clin Oncol. 2008 Oct 20;26(30):4875-8218725648
Cites: CMAJ. 2008 Oct 21;179(9):901-818936455
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 2008 Nov;18(11):827-3518809340
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2008 Dec;23(12):2095-10518836782
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Jan 1;360(1):89-9019118315
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2009 May;20(5):703-1418802659
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Apr 11;373(9671):1253-6319362675
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009;(2):CD00714619370674
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Apr 23;360(17):1789; author reply 1791-219387022
Cites: Calcif Tissue Int. 2009 Dec;85(6):484-9319823760
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Mar;95(3):1174-8120080842
Cites: Breast. 2010 Apr;19(2):92-620079640
Cites: BMJ. 2010;341:c369120671013
Cites: JAMA. 2010 Aug 11;304(6):657-6320699457
Cites: BMJ. 2010;341:c444420813820
Cites: CMAJ. 2010 Sep 7;182(12):1315-920624865
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2010 Nov;25(11):2350-820499367
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2010 Nov;25(11):2267-9420842676
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2011 Mar;22(3):839-4720959961
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2011 Mar;22(3):829-3721161508
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2011 Mar;22(3):817-2721161509
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2011 Jun;22(6):1873-8320967422
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2009 Dec;20(12):2111-2519421702
Cites: Endocr Rev. 2002 Aug;23(4):570-812202472
Cites: CMAJ. 2002 Nov 12;167(10 Suppl):S1-3412427685
Cites: Qual Saf Health Care. 2003 Feb;12(1):18-2312571340
Cites: JAMA. 2003 May 21;289(19):2525-3312759324
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2003 Nov;48(11):3224-914613287
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2004 Jun;19(6):893-915125788
Cites: BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2004 Apr 6;5:1115068488
Cites: Bone. 2004 Aug;35(2):375-8215268886
Cites: JAMA. 1997 Feb 19;277(7):543-79032160
Cites: BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2005;6:3916008835
Cites: Can Assoc Radiol J. 2005 Jun;56(3):178-8816144280
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2005 Oct;16(10):1281-9015614441
Cites: J Clin Densitom. 2005 Winter;8(4):371-816311420
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2006 Jan;88(1):25-3416391246
Cites: JAMA. 2006 Dec 27;296(24):2927-3817190893
Cites: Can Assoc Radiol J. 2007 Feb;58(1):27-3617408160
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2007 Aug;18(8):1033-4617323110
Comment In: CMAJ. 2011 Apr 5;183(6):69521464177
Comment In: CMAJ. 2011 Apr 5;183(6):695-621464176
Comment In: CMAJ. 2010 Nov 23;182(17):1829-3020940235
PubMed ID
20940232 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptability and compliance with wearing energy-shunting hip protectors: a 6-month prospective follow-up in a Finnish nursing home.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171901
Source
Age Ageing. 1998 Mar;27(2):225-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
J. Parkkari
J. Heikkilä
I P Kannus
Author Affiliation
Accident and Trauma Research Centre, UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research, Kaupinpuistonkatu I, FIN-33500 Tampere, Finland.
Source
Age Ageing. 1998 Mar;27(2):225-9
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Hip Fractures - prevention & control
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Male
Nursing Homes
Patient compliance
Patient satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Protective Clothing
Abstract
To assess the acceptability and compliance with use of an energy-shunting hip protector in institutionalized elderly people.
A 6 month prospective follow-up in a Finnish nursing home.
19 ambulatory nursing home residents with a high risk of hip fracture.
The proportion of the residents who were willing to use the device, the number of hours of wearing the protector and the attitudes of the study subjects and the caregivers towards the appearance, comfort, fit, efficacy and laundering of the protector.
12 of the 19 ambulatory residents (63%) agreed to use the protector. During the study period, these subjects wore the protector on average for more than 90% of their active days, i.e. the days they were mobile. Two subjects wore the protectors at night time; the rest only during waking hours. Mean wearing time during waking hours exceeded 90%.
External hip joint protectors are a feasible strategy to prevent hip fractures in institutionalized elderly people. The attitude, education and motivation of the staff may be a factor in achieving good user compliance. Further community-based studies on acceptability and compliance in wearing external hip joint protectors are needed for verification of benefits to the general population of older people.
Notes
Comment In: Age Ageing. 1998 Mar;27(2):89-9016296665
PubMed ID
16296684 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access to bathtub grab bars: evidence of a policy gap.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167317
Source
Can J Aging. 2006;25(3):295-304
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Nancy Edwards
Nicholas Birkett
Rama Nair
Maureen Murphy
Ginette Roberge
Donna Lockett
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, K1H 8M5, Canada. nancy.edwards@uottawa.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2006;25(3):295-304
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Baths - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Housing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Logistic Models
Public Housing - statistics & numerical data
Self-Help Devices - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This paper examines access to bathtub grab bars in privately and publicly owned apartment buildings and explores the profile of seniors who have access to bathtub grab bars. Results indicate that bathtub grab bars were significantly more prevalent in apartments that were publicly owned (91.3%) as compared to privately owned (37.8%) (p
PubMed ID
17001590 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Accidental falls among the elderly--can anything be done for this problem?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222883
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Oct 19;154(43):2949
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-19-1992
Author
A. Poulstrup
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Oct 19;154(43):2949
Date
Oct-19-1992
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Notes
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Jan 4;155(1):43-48421851
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Jan 4;155(1):438421850
PubMed ID
1462380 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accidental falls and injuries among seniors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225100
Source
Health Rep. 1992;4(4):341-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
R. Riley
Author Affiliation
Canadian Centre for Health Information.
Source
Health Rep. 1992;4(4):341-54
Date
1992
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - mortality - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Hospital Mortality
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Male
Population Surveillance
Sex Factors
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Abstract
This study analyzes data on accidental falls for those aged 65 and older. The data are based on mortality statistics from 1980 to 1989 and morbidity statistics from 1985 to 1989. These statistics are provided to the Canadian Centre for Health Information by the provincial governments. Mortality rates and hospital separation rates for accidental falls are highest for those aged 65 and older. Accidents are one of the leading causes of death and hospitalization among seniors. In 1989, for those aged 65 and older, accidental falls accounted for 56% of accidental deaths and 65% of accident-related hospital separations. Mortality and hospital separation rates for accidental falls increased with age. For those aged 65 and older, the mortality rates for accidental falls were higher for men than women. However, the accident-related hospital separation rate was higher for women than men. The reason for this difference is not fully understood, but it has been suggested that while more women fall than men, more men seriously injure themselves. For men requiring hospitalization due to accidental falls, the most common injuries, in descending order, were fractures of the hip, ribs, vertebral column, humerus, and pelvis. For women, the most common injuries were fractures of the hip, humerus, radius and ulna, pelvis, and ankle. Of fall-related injuries resulting in hospitalization, hip fractures were the leading cause of death and proportionately more men than women died of hip fractures.
PubMed ID
1306354 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accidental falls and related fractures in 65-74 year olds: a retrospective study of 332 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198241
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 2000 Apr;71(2):175-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
E. Nordell
G B Jarnlo
C. Jetsén
L. Nordström
K G Thorngren
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics, Lund University Hospital, Sweden. eva.nordell@ort.lu.se
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 2000 Apr;71(2):175-9
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Activities of Daily Living
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Documentation
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Male
Population Surveillance
Postural Balance
Referral and Consultation
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We investigated, by studying medical records, background factors and consequences of accidental falls of patients 65-74 years who attended the Department of Orthopedics' emergency clinic in Lund. We also assessed possible prevention measures. Fractures occurred in three quarters of the registered falls. Women were more prone to sustain fractures than men. Forearm fractures were commonest among women while hip fractures were commonest among men. One third of the patients were admitted to an orthopedic ward because of the fall. The patients who were less healthy had sustained fractures oftener and also needed more hospital care. Information regarding risk factors for falls and fractures were often missing in the patients' medical records. Impaired walking and balance, and medication increased the risk of falls. Such patients constitute a high risk group for future falls and fractures. A newly developed instrument is suggested as a routine in the emergency department to increase the awareness of risk factors for falls in the elderly. Satisfactory documentation is a prerequisite for further treatment and referrals to prevent falls and fractures.
PubMed ID
10852324 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Aug 21;165(4):468
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-21-2001
Author
E. Weir
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Aug 21;165(4):468
Date
Aug-21-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Male
Notes
Cites: J Pediatr Surg. 1999 Jul;34(7):1060-310442588
Cites: J Pediatr Orthop. 2000 Mar-Apr;20(2):197-20210739282
Cites: Surg Clin North Am. 1991 Apr;71(2):331-442003254
PubMed ID
11531065 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accidental falls, health-related quality of life and life satisfaction: a prospective study of the general elderly population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107598
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2014 Jan-Feb;58(1):95-100
Publication Type
Article
Author
Magnus Stenhagen
Henrik Ekström
Eva Nordell
Sölve Elmståhl
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, SE-205 02 Malmö, Sweden. Electronic address: magnus.stenhagen@med.lu.se.
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2014 Jan-Feb;58(1):95-100
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personal Satisfaction
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
As the physical consequences of accidental falls in the elderly are well-researched, the long-term associations between falls and quality of life and related concepts are less known. The aim of this study was to prospectively examine the long-term relations between falls and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and life satisfaction (LS) over six years in the general elderly population. One thousand three hundred and twenty-one subjects (aged 60-93 years), from the general population in the south of Sweden, were included in a baseline assessment and a follow-up after six years. HRQoL was measured with the SF-12 and LS with the life satisfaction index A (LSI-A). The differences in mean scores between fallers at baseline (n=113) and non-fallers were statistical analyzed. Furthermore, the prediction of falls on the outcomes was analyzed using a multivariate linear regression model adjusted for multiple confounding factors. Fallers scored significant lower in HRQoL and LS at baseline and after six years, compared to non-fallers, especially in the SF-12 physical component (p=
PubMed ID
23993268 View in PubMed
Less detail

752 records – page 1 of 76.