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A 4-year review of severe pediatric trauma in eastern Ontario: a descriptive analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191929
Source
J Trauma. 2002 Jan;52(1):8-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
Martin H Osmond
Maureen Brennan-Barnes
Allyson L Shephard
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. osmond@cheo.on.ca
Source
J Trauma. 2002 Jan;52(1):8-12
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Child Abuse - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Trauma Centers - statistics & numerical data
Trauma Severity Indices
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The objective of this study was to describe a population of children admitted to a tertiary care pediatric hospital with severe trauma to identify key areas for injury prevention research, and programming.
Retrospective chart review conducted on all children 0-17 years admitted to the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) between April 1, 1996, and March 31, 2000, following acute trauma. Each record was reviewed and assigned an ISS using the AIS 1990 revision. All cases with an ISS > 11 were included in the study.
There were 2610 trauma cases admitted to CHEO over the study period. Of these, 237 (9.1%) had severe trauma (ISS > 11). Sixty-two percent were male. Twenty-nine percent were between the ages of 10 and 14 years, 27% between 5 and 9 years, 16% between 15 and 17 years, 15% between 1 and 4 years, and 13% less than 1 year old. The most common mechanisms of injury were due to motor vehicle traffic (39%), falls (24%), child abuse (8%), and sports (5%). Of those resulting from motor vehicle traffic, 53 (57%) were occupants, 22 (24%) were pedestrians, and 18 (19%) were cyclists. When combining traffic and nontraffic mechanisms, 26 (11% of all severe trauma cases) occurred as a result of cycling incidents. The most severe injury in 65% of patients was to the head and neck body region.
Research efforts and activities to prevent severe pediatric trauma in our region should focus on road safety, protection from head injuries, avoidance of falls, and prevention of child abuse.
PubMed ID
11791045 View in PubMed
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[A campaign against home accidents--accident prevention efforts in the communities].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228180
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Oct 30;110(26):3387-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1990
Author
F. Thuen
K I Klepp
R. Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
Nasjonalforeningens HEMIL-senter, Universitetet i Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Oct 30;110(26):3387-90
Date
Oct-30-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidents, Home - prevention & control
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Norway
Primary prevention - methods
Abstract
A nation-wide campaign aimed at preventing accidents in the home is being implemented in Norway. 95% of the municipalities acknowledge having received information material from the campaign, 33% report having established accident prevention committees, and 26% report having introduced preventive measures as a result of this national campaign. The study indicates that accidents are not recognized as yet as a major health problem in many municipalities. Identification of accidents as a health problem seems to be an important factor in the preventive efforts. To enhance further accident prevention efforts it seems important to increase awareness of accident as a health problem, and to increase the involvement of key personnel within the community.
PubMed ID
2256065 View in PubMed
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Accidental deaths among British Columbia Indians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112073
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Jan 29;94(5):228-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-29-1966
Author
N. Schmitt
L W Hole
W S Barclay
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Jan 29;94(5):228-34
Date
Jan-29-1966
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidents
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholic Intoxication
British Columbia
Burns
Child
Child, Preschool
Drowning
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Abstract
A statistical and epidemiological review of British Columbia native Indian and non-Indian mortality revealed that accidents were the leading cause of death among Indians but ranked only fourth among non-Indians. Comparison of accidental death rates by age and sex showed that, without exception, the rates among Indians were considerably higher than the corressponding rates for non-Indians. While the Indians represented some 2% of the total population of British Columbia, they accounted for over 10% of the total accident fatalities, 29% of drownings, and 21% of fatal burns.Socioeconomic, environmental and psychosocial factors and excessive drinking are considered the chief causes responsible for this rather unusual epidemiological phenomenon.This study revealed certain hazardous conditions which are specific to the Indian's present way of life. In the authors' opinion the recognition of these specific hazards is imperative for the planning of effective preventive campaigns.
Notes
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1962 Oct;53:409-1213992080
PubMed ID
5902238 View in PubMed
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Accidental deaths among British Columbia Indians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102957
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Jan 29;94(5):228-34.
Publication Type
Article
Date
29 Jan 1966
  1 website  
Author
Schmitt N
Hole LW
Barclay WS
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Jan 29;94(5):228-34.
Date
29 Jan 1966
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidents
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholic Intoxication
British Columbia
Burns
Child
Child, Preschool
Drowning
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Abstract
A statistical and epidemiological review of British Columbia native Indian and non-Indian mortality revealed that accidents were the leading cause of death among Indians but ranked only fourth among non-Indians. Comparison of accidental death rates by age and sex showed that, without exception, the rates among Indians were considerably higher than the corressponding rates for non-Indians. While the Indians represented some 2% of the total population of British Columbia, they accounted for over 10% of the total accident fatalities, 29% of drownings, and 21% of fatal burns.Socioeconomic, environmental and psychosocial factors and excessive drinking are considered the chief causes responsible for this rather unusual epidemiological phenomenon.This study revealed certain hazardous conditions which are specific to the Indian's present way of life. In the authors' opinion the recognition of these specific hazards is imperative for the planning of effective preventive campaigns.
Online Resources
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Accidental firearm fatalities during hunting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12584
Source
Am J Forensic Med Pathol. 1987 Jun;8(2):112-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1987
Author
L. Ornehult
A. Eriksson
Source
Am J Forensic Med Pathol. 1987 Jun;8(2):112-9
Date
Jun-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidents
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Firearms
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Swedish legislation concerning firearms is highly restrictive. It is illegal to possess weapons (except airguns) without a license. From 1970 through 1982, there were 79 accidental firearm fatalities in Sweden. This number, corresponding to 0.074/100,000/year, is very low in comparison with similar statistics worldwide. Of these fatalities, 47 were associated with hunting and were studied carefully. Despite an increase in both the popularity of hunting and in licensing of weapons, on change in the number of accidents per year could be confirmed. Twenty-nine accidents occurred during small game hunting, of which 24 involved shotguns, and 18 occurred during moose hunting. The mean age overall was 46 years. All victims and shooters were men. Most accidents occurred before noon and during the autumn. During moose hunting, the victim most commonly was either mistaken for game or was standing beyond game. During small game hunting, the most common reason for death was improper handling of the weapon. Firing of defective weapons caused at least 10 fatal accidents. Alcohol inebriation was uncommon. It is unlikely that more restrictive firearm legislation would further decrease the number of fatal accidents. Instead, we believe that accidental firearm fatalities during hunting can be prevented by safer and more careful handling of weapons, including unloading weapons before transporting them; by replacing older weapons with more modern and safer ones; and by not allowing children to handle weapons. No shots should be fired until it is clarified that the target really is a game animal, and when hunting with rifles, the fields of fire should be clarified beforehand. Shooters at stand must be instructed not to leave their stands until explicitly told to do so.
PubMed ID
3605004 View in PubMed
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Accidental poisoning in pre-school children in the Stockholm area. Medical, psychosocial and preventive aspects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41505
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1979;275:96-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979
Author
M. Eriksson
G. Larsson
B. Winbladh
R. Zetterström
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1979;275:96-101
Date
1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Child
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Humans
Parents
Poisoning - epidemiology - mortality - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
Accidental poisoning in pre-school children requiring hospital admission has increased sixfold from 1955 to 1975 in the Stockholm area. The mortality from this accident has decreased from 0.5 to less than 0.1 per 100 000 pre-school children in the whole of Sweden during the same period. Medical and psychosocial background factors were investigated in 104 consecutive in-patients (0--6 years old) with accidental poisoning and compared to an out-patient group, a group of patients who only had called the poison control centre, and a matched control group from Child Health Centres. There were no difference between the groups regarding health and history of earlier accidents except that 20--25% of the families of the poisoned children and 7% of the control families had called the Poison Control Centre before. Change of residence during the last 6 months was much commoner among families of poisoned children than of nonpoisoned. Other social stress factors were more common among in-patients than out-patients. The measures taken by the parents to combat the poisoning were adequate in most cases. The decrease in mortality inspite of the increase in potentially dangerous accidental poisonings may be attributed to a good knowledge among parents about adequate measures and where to seek advice resulting in early treatment, and to intensive care and antidote therapy.
PubMed ID
291296 View in PubMed
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Accident-injury organization: Canadian overview.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238123
Source
Can J Surg. 1985 Nov;28(6):482-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1985
Author
C M Burns
Source
Can J Surg. 1985 Nov;28(6):482-6
Date
Nov-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidents, Traffic
Alcohol Drinking
Canada
Humans
Transportation of Patients
Trauma Centers - organization & administration
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
Trauma from motor vehicle accidents is a major health-care problem, resulting in enormous economic losses to the country, and is second only to heart disease as a reason for hospitalization in Canada. Funding fro research and accident-injury programs is critically low. National and provincial trauma registries must be developed to provide data that can be used appropriately to plan and monitor the strategy of accident health-care and prevention programs. Manitoba, which has in place a trauma registry, has a province-wide trauma system comprising two comprehensive trauma units and seven regional centres located strategically in the catchment areas of the major centres. A comparison of the performance of this system with that of hospitals in Baltimore has shown that the Manitoba system provides an equal level of care. The author recommends that a trauma system be established that a trauma system be established in regions of one to two million population. Each region should have one to three comprehensive trauma services and a number of regional trauma services, each strategically located. With appropriate funding for trauma care, the proposed system would pay for itself.
PubMed ID
4063888 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Aug 20;111(19):2404-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-20-1991
Author
H. Reiso
N. Homb
J. Båtnes
N. Holm
T D Christiansen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Aug 20;111(19):2404-6
Date
Aug-20-1991
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Abstract
All accidents treated by the Primary Health Services in Vågå Municipality in 1988, were registered. There were altogether 498 accidents (124 accidents per 1,000 inhabitants per year). 418 injured persons were treated by the local health service, 80 were referred to hospital. The major mechanism of injury was falling (38%). The accidents occurred most frequently at home (38%), at the sports-ground/outdoors (23%) or at work (17%). 11 injuries were very serious, none were lethal. 44 occurred during skiing. Our work to prevent accidents will give priority to: the mother and child clinic; environmental health; skiing accidents.
PubMed ID
1926074 View in PubMed
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Accident prevention--establish safety program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241945
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1983 May;60(5):21
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1983

467 records – page 1 of 47.