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CMAJ 2011 election survey: transparency.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134779
Source
CMAJ. 2011 Jun 14;183(9):E513-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-14-2011

Attitudes to privacy, health records and interconnection: implications for healthcare organizations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188344
Source
Hosp Q. 2002;5(4):40-5, 2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Earl Berger
Author Affiliation
Hay Healthcare Consulting Group, Canada. Earl_Berger@haygroup.com
Source
Hosp Q. 2002;5(4):40-5, 2
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information - legislation & jurisprudence
Attitude to Health
Canada
Confidentiality - legislation & jurisprudence
Data Collection
Ethics
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
National Health Programs
Organizational Policy
Abstract
About nine in 10 Canadians support legislation that would protect patient confidentiality. However, the Canadian public is not consistent in its views regarding privacy. Data suggest that the public's attitudes to privacy, and particularly access to medical records, are heavily influenced by the context in which the situation is presented and potential benefits to the individual or to the public.
PubMed ID
12357571 View in PubMed
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The Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act: physician prescription data and Canadian health system reviews.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188521
Source
Health Law Can. 2002 Aug;23(1):1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002

Attitudes to sharing personal health information in living kidney donation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144792
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2010 Apr;5(4):717-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Patricia Hizo-Abes
Ann Young
Peter P Reese
Phil McFarlane
Linda Wright
Meaghan Cuerden
Amit X Garg
Author Affiliation
London Kidney Clinical Research Unit, Room ELL-101, Westminster, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 4G5, Canada.
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2010 Apr;5(4):717-22
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information - legislation & jurisprudence
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Confidentiality - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Policy
Health Records, Personal
Humans
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Kidney Transplantation - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Living Donors - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Patient Education as Topic
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Questionnaires
Abstract
In living kidney donation, transplant professionals consider the rights of a living kidney donor and recipient to keep their personal health information confidential and the need to disclose this information to the other for informed consent. In incompatible kidney exchange, personal health information from multiple living donors and recipients may affect decision making and outcomes.
We conducted a survey to understand and compare the preferences of potential donors (n = 43), potential recipients (n = 73), and health professionals (n = 41) toward sharing personal health information (in total 157 individuals).
When considering traditional live-donor transplantation, donors and recipients generally agreed that a recipient's health information should be shared with the donor (86 and 80%, respectively) and that a donor's information should be shared with the recipient (97 and 89%, respectively). When considering incompatible kidney exchange, donors and recipients generally agreed that a recipient's information should be shared with all donors and recipients involved in the transplant (85 and 85%, respectively) and that a donor's information should also be shared with all involved (95 and 90%, respectively). These results were contrary to attitudes expressed by transplant professionals, who frequently disagreed about whether such information should be shared.
Future policies and practice could facilitate greater sharing of personal health information in living kidney donation. This requires a consideration of which information is relevant, how to put it in context, and a plan to obtain consent from all concerned.
Notes
Cites: Am J Transplant. 2003 Jul;3(7):830-412814474
Cites: Am J Transplant. 2009 Jul;9(7):1558-7319459792
Cites: Transplantation. 2004 Aug 27;78(4):491-215446304
Cites: Lancet. 1992 Oct 3;340(8823):807-101357243
Cites: Can J Surg. 2004 Dec;47(6):408-1315646438
Cites: Transplantation. 2005 Mar 27;79(6 Suppl):S53-6615785361
Cites: HIV Med. 2006 Apr;7(3):133-916494626
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2006 Aug 1;145(3):185-9616880460
Cites: J Pers Assess. 2006 Dec;87(3):305-1617134338
Cites: Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2006 Nov;1(6):1148-5317699340
Cites: Am J Transplant. 2008 Sep;8(9):1878-9018671676
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2008 Oct;23(10):3316-2418599559
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Mar 12;360(11):1096-10119279341
Cites: J Med Ethics. 2009 Apr;35(4):270-119332587
Cites: Kidney Int. 2009 May;75(10):1088-9819225540
Cites: Am J Transplant. 2004 Oct;4(10):1553-415367208
PubMed ID
20299371 View in PubMed
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[The law does not prevent health care professionals from reading patient data].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105084
Source
Lakartidningen. 2013 Dec 4-17;110(49-50):2216-7
Publication Type
Article

Federal government unveils modest transparency initiative.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136007
Source
CMAJ. 2011 Apr 19;183(7):E383-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-19-2011

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292507
Source
J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2017 Nov; 11(6):1234-1239
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Ellen K Christiansen
Eva Skipenes
Marie F Hausken
Svein Skeie
Truls Østbye
Marjolein M Iversen
Author Affiliation
1 Norwegian Centre for Integrated Care and Telemedicine, University Hospital of North Norway (UNN), Tromsø, Norway.
Source
J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2017 Nov; 11(6):1234-1239
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Access to Information - legislation & jurisprudence
Computer Security - legislation & jurisprudence
Confidentiality - legislation & jurisprudence
Electronic Health Records - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Policy
Humans
Information Dissemination - legislation & jurisprudence
Norway
Patient care team
Policy Making
Telemedicine - legislation & jurisprudence
Ulcer - diagnosis - therapy
Abstract
Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.
Notes
Cites: J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2011 May 01;5(3):768-77 PMID 21722592
Cites: Stud Health Technol Inform. 2011;169:417-21 PMID 21893784
Cites: JMIR Res Protoc. 2016 Jul 18;5(3):e148 PMID 27430301
PubMed ID
28560899 View in PubMed
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Unlocking Health Canada's cache of trade secrets: mandatory disclosure of clinical trial results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131803
Source
CMAJ. 2012 Feb 7;184(2):194-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-7-2012
Author
Matthew Herder
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS. Matthew.Herder@Dal.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2012 Feb 7;184(2):194-9
Date
Feb-7-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information - legislation & jurisprudence
Canada
Clinical Trials as Topic - legislation & jurisprudence
Confidentiality - legislation & jurisprudence
Drug Industry - legislation & jurisprudence
Government Agencies - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Mandatory Programs - legislation & jurisprudence
Off-Label Use - legislation & jurisprudence
Prescription Drugs - adverse effects
Public Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Registries
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2004 Feb 17;170(4):487-914970096
Cites: Lancet. 2004 Apr 24;363(9418):1341-515110490
Cites: CMAJ. 2004 May 25;170(11):1678-8615159366
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2004 Sep 21;141(6):477-815355883
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Oct 21;351(17):1707-915470193
Cites: CMAJ. 2011 Jul 12;183(10):1125-621502342
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Jan 17;358(3):252-6018199864
Cites: CMAJ. 2008 Feb 12;178(4):428-3118268270
Cites: Curr Med Res Opin. 2008 Jun;24(6):1683-918462565
Cites: PLoS Med. 2008 Nov 25;5(11):e217; discussion e21719067477
Cites: BMJ. 2011;342:d257021511787
Cites: BMJ. 2005 Apr 23;330(7497):956-815845980
PubMed ID
21876028 View in PubMed
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31 records – page 1 of 4.