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Norway's ICT Accessibility Legislation, Methods and Indicators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291059
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016; 229:471-81
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
Malin Rygg
Dagfinn Rømen
Brynhild Runa Sterri
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Authority for Universal Design of ICT, Agency for Public Management and eGovernment (Difi), Norway.
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016; 229:471-81
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Access to Information - legislation & jurisprudence
Communication
Information Technology - legislation & jurisprudence
Norway
Abstract
This paper gives an overview of the Norwegian legislation on Universal Design of information and communication technology (ICT) and how the Norwegian Authority for Universal Design of ICT works to enforce and achieve the goals behind the legislation. The Authority uses indicators to check websites for compliance with the regulations. This paper describes the rationale and intended use for the indicators and how they are used for both supervision and benchmarks as well as a way of gathering data to give an overview of the current state of Universal Design of websites in Norway.
PubMed ID
27534342 View in PubMed
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Genomic Databases and Biobanks in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280292
Source
J Law Med Ethics. 2015;43(4):743-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Mette Hartlev
Source
J Law Med Ethics. 2015;43(4):743-53
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information - legislation & jurisprudence
Biological Specimen Banks - legislation & jurisprudence
Confidentiality - legislation & jurisprudence
Databases, Genetic - legislation & jurisprudence
Denmark
Genetic Research - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Abstract
Biobanking in Denmark is regulated via patients' rights laws, data protection laws, and research ethics reviews. Danish law recognizes tissue samples as personal data for purposes of the data protection laws, meaning research with tissue samples may be subject to research ethics review, data protection laws, and patients' rights requirements depending on the circumstances of collection. However, research on information gained through whole genome sequencing is subject only to data protection laws, despite the similarity in the nature of the information. The regulatory framework treats biobank samples collected from patients differently than samples collected from research participants, particularly with respect to autonomy. Importantly, biobanks established for future unspecified research are not subject to research ethics review. Biobank-based research has gained more prominence on the national level recently, and the potential for a less fragmented and more consistent regulatory approach may emerge from this attention.
PubMed ID
26711414 View in PubMed
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The right to know about chemical hazards in Canada, 1982-2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156967
Source
New Solut. 2008;18(2):233-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Dave Bennett
Author Affiliation
daveandjoanne@mts.net
Source
New Solut. 2008;18(2):233-43
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information - legislation & jurisprudence
Canada
Disclosure - legislation & jurisprudence
Hazardous Substances
Humans
Information Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Occupational Exposure - legislation & jurisprudence
Occupational health - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
Traditionally in Canada, there are three health and safety rights: the right to participate (joint workplace health and safety committees); the right to refuse unsafe and unhealthy work; and the right to know about workplace hazards. By the end of the 1970s, the right to know had been established in law across Canada, but it was not enough to cover workplace chemical hazards in particular. The Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) was a project set up by the Canadian federal government in 1982 to address the issue. This article tells the story of how labor got the progressive WHMIS agreement(1985) and how the agreement has been implemented in the following years.
PubMed ID
18511399 View in PubMed
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