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The right to know about chemical hazards in Canada, 1982-2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156967
Source
New Solut. 2008;18(2):233-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Dave Bennett
Author Affiliation
daveandjoanne@mts.net
Source
New Solut. 2008;18(2):233-43
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information - legislation & jurisprudence
Canada
Disclosure - legislation & jurisprudence
Hazardous Substances
Humans
Information Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Occupational Exposure - legislation & jurisprudence
Occupational health - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
Traditionally in Canada, there are three health and safety rights: the right to participate (joint workplace health and safety committees); the right to refuse unsafe and unhealthy work; and the right to know about workplace hazards. By the end of the 1970s, the right to know had been established in law across Canada, but it was not enough to cover workplace chemical hazards in particular. The Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) was a project set up by the Canadian federal government in 1982 to address the issue. This article tells the story of how labor got the progressive WHMIS agreement(1985) and how the agreement has been implemented in the following years.
PubMed ID
18511399 View in PubMed
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