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Access and authorisation in a Glocal e-Health Policy context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180735
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2004 Mar 31;73(3):259-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-31-2004
Author
Richard E Scott
Penny Jennett
Maryann Yeo
Author Affiliation
Global e-Health Research and Training Program, G204 Health Sciences Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 4N1. rescott@ucalgary.ca
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2004 Mar 31;73(3):259-66
Date
Mar-31-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information
Canada
Computer Security
Health Policy
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - organization & administration - standards
Security Measures
World Health
Abstract
Challenges to the development of appropriate yet adaptable policy and tools for security of the individual patient electronic health record (EHR) are proving to be significant. Compounding this is the unique capability of e-health to transgress all existing geo-political and other barriers. Initiatives to develop and advance policy, standards, and tools in relation to EHR access control and authorisation management must address this capability. Currently policy development initiatives take place largely in an isolated manner. This jeopardises the potential of e-health because decisions made in one jurisdiction might hamper, even prevent, an e-health opportunity in another. This paper places access and authorisation issues in an overall policy context through describing current Canadian initiatives. The National Initiative for Telehealth (NIFTE) Guidelines project is developing a framework of national guidelines for telehealth. The Policy and Peer Permission (PPP) project is developing a unique tool that provides persistent protection of data. The new corporate body 'Infoway' is developing a pan-Canadian electronic health record solution. Finally, the Glocal e-Health Policy initiative is developing a tool with which to identify and describe the inter-relationships of e-health issues amongst policy levels, themes, and actors.
PubMed ID
15066556 View in PubMed
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Access and benefits sharing of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge in northern Canada: understanding the legal environment and creating effective research agreements

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284320
Source
Pages 912-920 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):912-920
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Geary J1, Jardine CG, Guebert J, Bubela T.
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
Source
Pages 912-920 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):912-920
Date
2013
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Access to Information/legislation & jurisprudence
Biomedical Research/legislation & jurisprudence
Biomedical Research/organization & administration
Canada
Community-Institutional Relations/legislation & jurisprudence
Culture
Financing, Government
Genetics, Medical/legislation & jurisprudence
Genetics, Medical/organization & administration
Health Policy
Humans
Indians, North American/ethnology
Indians, North American/genetics
Indians, North American/legislation & jurisprudence
Documents
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Access to electronic health records by care setting and provider type: perceptions of cancer care providers in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149234
Source
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2009;9:38
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Margo C Orchard
Mark J Dobrow
Lawrence Paszat
Hedy Jiang
Patrick Brown
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy, Management & Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5J 2P1, Canada. margo.orchard@utoronto.ca
Source
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2009;9:38
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information
Adult
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Facilities - classification
Health Personnel - classification
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - supply & distribution - utilization
Middle Aged
Ontario
Abstract
The use of electronic health records (EHRs) to support the organization and delivery of healthcare is evolving rapidly. However, little is known regarding potential variation in access to EHRs by provider type or care setting. This paper reports on observed variation in the perceptions of access to EHRs by a wide range of cancer care providers covering diverse cancer care settings in Ontario, Canada.
Perspectives were sought regarding EHR access and health record completeness for cancer patients as part of an internet survey of 5663 cancer care providers and administrators in Ontario. Data were analyzed using a multilevel logistic regression model. Provider type, location of work, and access to computer or internet were included as covariates in the model.
A total of 1997 of 5663 (35%) valid responses were collected. Focusing on data from cancer care providers (N = 1247), significant variation in EHR access and health record completeness was observed between provider types, location of work, and level of computer access. Providers who worked in community hospitals were half as likely as those who worked in teaching hospitals to have access to their patients' EHRs (OR 0.45 95% CI: 0.24-0.85, p
Notes
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PubMed ID
19664247 View in PubMed
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Access to the Internet among drinkers, smokers and illicit drug users: is it a barrier to the provision of interventions on the World Wide Web?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168991
Source
Med Inform Internet Med. 2006 Mar;31(1):53-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
John A Cunningham
Peter L Selby
Kypros Kypri
Keith N Humphreys
Author Affiliation
School of Medical Practice and Population Health, University of Newcastle, Toronto, Ontario, CA. John.Cunningham@camh.net
Source
Med Inform Internet Med. 2006 Mar;31(1):53-8
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Female
Humans
Internet
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Smoking
Street Drugs
Substance-Related Disorders
Abstract
Expanding Internet-based interventions for substance use will have little benefit if heavy substance users are unlikely to have Internet access. This paper explored whether access to the Internet was a potential barrier to the provision of services for smokers, drinkers and illicit drug users.
As part of a general population telephone survey of adults in Ontario, Canada, respondents were asked about their use of different drugs and also about their use of the Internet.
Pack-a-day smokers were less likely (48%) to have home Internet access than non-smokers (69%), and current drinkers (73%) were more likely to have home access than abstainers (50%). These relationships remained true even after controlling for demographic characteristics. Internet access was less clearly associated with cannabis or cocaine use.
Even though there is variation in access among smokers, drinkers and illicit drug users, the World Wide Web remains an excellent opportunity to potentially provide services for substance abusers who might never access treatment in person because, in absolute terms, the majority of substance abusers do use the Internet.
PubMed ID
16754367 View in PubMed
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Alert information in the Norwegian Summary Care Record.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259833
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2014 Oct 28;134(20):1927-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-28-2014
Author
Eirik Nikolai Arnesen
Bent Asgeir Larsen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2014 Oct 28;134(20):1927-8
Date
Oct-28-2014
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information
Electronic Health Records - organization & administration
Humans
Medical Record Linkage
Norway
PubMed ID
25350434 View in PubMed
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Alternatives for protecting privacy while respecting patient care and public health needs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80584
Source
Ethics Inf Technol. 1999;1(4):249-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
DeCew J W
Author Affiliation
Clark University, Worcester, MA, USA.
Source
Ethics Inf Technol. 1999;1(4):249-55
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information
Databases, Factual
European Union
Federal Government
Germany
Government Regulation
Guidelines
Humans
Informed consent
Internet
Medical Records
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Models, organizational
Negotiating
Privacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Private Sector
Public Policy
Security Measures
Social Control, Informal
Sweden
United States
Abstract
This paper begins with a discussion of the value of privacy, especially for medical records in an age of advancing technology. I then examine three alternative approaches to protection of medical records: reliance on governmental guidelines, the use of corporate self-regulation, and my own third hybrid view on how to maintain a presumption in favor of privacy with respect to medical information, safeguarding privacy as vigorously and comprehensively as possible, without sacrificing the benefits of new information technology in medicine. None of the three models I examine are unproblematic, yet it is crucial to weigh the strengths and weaknesses of these alternative approaches.
PubMed ID
16986224 View in PubMed
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Alternatives to project-specific consent for access to personal information for health research: what is the opinion of the Canadian public?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161798
Source
J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2007 Nov-Dec;14(6):706-12
Publication Type
Article
Author
Donald J Willison
Lisa Schwartz
Julia Abelson
Cathy Charles
Marilyn Swinton
David Northrup
Lehana Thabane
Author Affiliation
Centre for Evaluation of Medicines, St. Joseph's Healthcare, 105 Main Street East, P1, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. willison@mcmaster.ca
Source
J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2007 Nov-Dec;14(6):706-12
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information
Attitude to Health
Biomedical research
Canada
Confidentiality
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Medical Records
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Public Opinion
Trust
Abstract
This study sought to determine public opinion on alternatives to project-specific consent for use of their personal information for health research.
The authors conducted a fixed-response random-digit dialed telephone survey of 1,230 adults across Canada.
We measured attitudes toward privacy and health research; trust in different institutions to keep information confidential; and consent choice for research use of one's own health information involving medical record review, automated abstraction of information from the electronic medical record, and linking education or income with health data.
Support was strong for both health research and privacy protection. Studying communicable diseases and quality of health care had greatest support (85% to 89%). Trust was highest for data institutes, university researchers, hospitals, and disease foundations (78% to 80%). Four percent of respondents thought information from their paper medical record should not be used at all for research, 32% thought permission should be obtained for each use, 29% supported broad consent, 24% supported notification and opt out, and 11% felt no need for notification or consent. Opinions were more polarized for automated abstraction of data from the electronic medical record. Respondents were more willing to link education with health data than income.
Most of the public supported alternatives to study-specific consent, but few supported use without any notification or consent. Consent choices for research use of one's health information should be documented in the medical record. The challenge remains how best to elicit those choices and ensure that they are up-to-date.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17712084 View in PubMed
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Analysis of the Updated Swedish Regulatory Framework of the Patient Accessible Electronic Health Record in Relation to Usage Experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292465
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2017; 245:798-802
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Isabella Scandurra
Maria Pettersson
Benny Eklund
Leif Lyttkens
Author Affiliation
Informatics, School of Business, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2017; 245:798-802
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Access to Information
Electronic Health Records
Health Records, Personal
Humans
Patient-Centered Care
Sweden
Telemedicine
Abstract
In Sweden, all citizens can (in 2017) access their health data online from all county councils using one national eHealth service. However, depending on where the patient lives, different information is provided as care providers have assessed differently how to apply the National Regulatory Framework (NRF). The NRF recently was updated and this paper analyses version 2.0 should now serve as the guideline for all county councils. Potential improvements are analyzed in relation to patient experiences of using the service, and the rationale for each change in the NRF is discussed. Two real case quotations are used to illustrate potential implications for the patient when the new version is placed into operation. Results indicate that this NRF allows for opportunities to create a national eHealth service that better supports patient-centered care and improves health information outcome.
PubMed ID
29295208 View in PubMed
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Applying usability testing techniques to improve a health promotion website.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157179
Source
Health Promot J Austr. 2008 Apr;19(1):29-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Anetta Hinchliffe
W Kerry Mummery
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Arts, Health and Sciences, Central Queensland University, Queensland. a.hinchliffe@cqu.edu.au
Source
Health Promot J Austr. 2008 Apr;19(1):29-35
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information
Adult
Canada
Consumer Satisfaction
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Internet
Program Evaluation
Social Marketing
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
Use of the Internet for health promotion is increasing; however, the lack of published research regarding website usability suggests that health promotion websites are being developed without consultation with their users or formal evaluation. This study conducted usability testing of an existing health promotion website to inform modifications and to identify common usability themes that should be addressed by organisations developing or maintaining a health promotion website.
A combination of qualitative and quantitative techniques were implemented during the usability testing sessions to gather data from users while completing tasks on the website. Techniques included performance measures (time taken), direct observation (participant observation) and subjective user preferences (questionnaire and interview).
Improvements to the website were measured in terms of reduced problems reported, reduced time taken to complete tasks and increased subjective reports. Seven usability themes emerged from the data: design, feedback, format, instructions, navigation, terminology and learnability.
This study demonstrates the application of usability testing to the design and modification of a health promotion website and illustrates the areas or themes that can be used as a framework for testing and modification.
PubMed ID
18481929 View in PubMed
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Attitudes about donor information differ greatly between IVF couples using their own gametes and those receiving or donating oocytes or sperm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280849
Source
J Assist Reprod Genet. 2016 Jun;33(6):703-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Agneta Skoog Svanberg
G. Sydsjö
M. Bladh
C. Lampic
Source
J Assist Reprod Genet. 2016 Jun;33(6):703-10
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude
Family Characteristics
Female
Fertilization in Vitro - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Oocyte Donation - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Spermatozoa
Sweden
Tissue Donors - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Abstract
The objective of the study is to examine attitudes towards aspects of donation treatment based on a national Swedish sample of gamete donors and couples undergoing assisted reproductive techniques (ART).
The present study was part of the Swedish study on gamete donation, a prospective longitudinal cohort study including all fertility clinics performing gamete donation in Sweden. The sample comprised 164 oocyte donors, 89 sperm donors, 251 people treated with their own gametes (in vitro fertilisation (IVF)), 213 oocyte recipients and 487 sperm recipients. A study-specific questionnaire was used.
Attitudes vary widely between couples using their own gametes for IVF and those receiving or donating oocyte or sperm. The groups differed in their responses to most questions. Oocyte and sperm donors were more likely to agree with the statements "The donor should be informed if the donation results in a child" and "Offspring should receive some information about the donor during mature adolescence" than recipients of donated gametes and couples treated with their own gametes.
Donor recipients, IVF couples and donors expressed different attitudes towards openness and information when it came to gamete donation, and those differences seemed to depend on their current reproductive situation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27059774 View in PubMed
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147 records – page 1 of 15.