Skip header and navigation

Refine By

3394 records – page 1 of 340.

Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2006 Feb;72(1):47-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
William H Ryding
Author Affiliation
Hastings and Prince Edward Counties Health Unit, Belleville, Ontario, Canada. bryding@hpechu.on.ca
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2006 Feb;72(1):47-8
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Dental Care - economics - utilization
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
National Health Programs
Poverty
PubMed ID
16480604 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2-year costs and effects of a public health nursing case management intervention on mood-disordered single parents on social assistance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191135
Source
J Eval Clin Pract. 2002 Feb;8(1):45-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Maureen Markle-Reid
Gina Browne
Jacqueline Roberts
Amiram Gafni
Carolyn Byrne
Author Affiliation
System-Linked Research Unit on Health and Social Service Utilization, School of Nursing, McMaster University, Room 3N46, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 3Z5, Canada. mreid@mcmaster.ca
Source
J Eval Clin Pract. 2002 Feb;8(1):45-59
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Case Management - economics
Child
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Depressive Disorder - economics - nursing - rehabilitation
Employment
Female
Health Care Costs
Health Services - utilization
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Ontario
Public Assistance
Public Health Nursing - economics
Single Parent - psychology
Social Adjustment
Abstract
This randomized controlled trial was designed to evaluate the 2-year costs and effects of a proactive, public health nursing case management approach compared with a self-directed approach for 129 single parents (98% were mothers) on social assistance in a Canadian setting. A total of 43% of these parents had a major depressive disorder and 38% had two or three other health conditions at baseline.
Study participants were recruited over a 12 month period and randomized into two groups: one receiving proactive public health nursing and one which did not.
At 2 years, 69 single parents with 123 children receiving proactive public health nursing (compared with 60 parents with 91 children who did not receive public health nursing services) showed a slightly greater reduction in dysthymia and slightly higher social adjustment. There was no difference between the public health and control groups in total per parent annual cost of health and support services. However, costs were averted due to a 12% difference in non-use of social assistance in the previous 12 months for parents in the public health nursing group. This translates into an annual cost saving of 240,000 dollars (Canadian) of costs averted within 1 year for every 100 parents.
In the context of a system of national health and social insurance, this study supports the fact that it is no more costly to proactively service this population of parents on social assistance.
PubMed ID
11882101 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 6 dimensions of promising practice for case managed supports to end homelessness: part 2: the 6 dimensions of quality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129049
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2012 Jan-Feb;17(1):4-12; quiz 13-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katrina Milaney
Author Affiliation
Calgary Homeless Foundation, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. kmilaney@calgaryhomeless.com
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2012 Jan-Feb;17(1):4-12; quiz 13-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Case Management - standards - statistics & numerical data
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Homeless Persons - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Patient care team
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards - statistics & numerical data
Professional Competence
Quality of Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Homelessness is a social condition increasing in frequency and severity across Canada. Interventions to end and prevent homelessness include effective case management in addition to an affordable housing provision. Little standardization exists for service providers to guide their decision making in developing and maintaining effective case management programs. The purpose of this 2-part article is to articulate dimensions of promising practice for case managers working in a "Housing First" context. Part 1 discusses research processes and findings and Part 2 articulates the 6 dimensions of quality.
Practice settings include community-based organizations that employ and support case managers whose primary role is moving people from homelessness into permanent supportive housing.
Six dimensions of promising practice are critically important to reducing barriers, improving sector collaboration, and ensuring that case managers have appropriate and effective training and support. Dimensions of promising practice are (1) collaboration and cooperation-a true team approach; (2) right matching of services-person-centered; (3) contextual case management-culture and flexibility; (4) the right kind of engagement-relationships and advocacy; (5) coordinated and well-managed system-ethics and communication; and (6) evaluation for success-support and training.
Effective, coordinated case management, in addition to permanent affordable housing has the potential to reduce a person's or family's homelessness permanently. Organizations and professionals working in this context have the opportunity to improve processes, reduce burnout, collaborate and standardize, and, most importantly, efficiently and permanently end someone's homelessness with the help of dimensions of quality for case management.
PubMed ID
22146635 View in PubMed
Less detail

45th ESCP-NSF international symposium on clinical pharmacy: clinical pharmacy tackling inequalities and access to health care. Oslo, Norway, 5-7 October 2016.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283198
Source
Int J Clin Pharm. 2017 Feb;39(1):208-341
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Feb-2017

A 50-Year Commitment to American Indian and Alaska Native Women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304709
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2020 10; 136(4):739-744
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
10-2020
Author
Alan G Waxman
William H J Haffner
Jean Howe
Kathleen Wilder
Tony Ogburn
Neil Murphy
Eve Espey
J Martin Tucker
Amanda Bruegl
Elaine Locke
Yvonne Malloy
Author Affiliation
University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico; the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland; the Northern Navajo Medical Center, Shiprock, New Mexico; the Mid-Columbia Medical Center, The Dalles, Oregon; the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, Texas; the Alaska Native Medical Center, Anchorage, Alaska; the University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi; the Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon; and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Washington, DC.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2020 10; 136(4):739-744
Date
10-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaskan Natives
Female
Gynecology
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration - standards - trends
Healthcare Disparities - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American
Intersectoral Collaboration
Obstetrics
Program Evaluation
Quality Improvement - organization & administration
Rural Health Services - standards
Surveys and Questionnaires
United States - epidemiology
Urban Health Services - standards
Vulnerable Populations - ethnology
Women's Health Services - organization & administration - standards - trends
Abstract
Since 1970, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' Committee on American Indian and Alaska Native Women's Health has partnered with the Indian Health Service and health care facilities serving Native American women to improve quality of care in both rural and urban settings. Needs assessments have included formal surveys, expert panels, consensus conferences, and onsite program reviews. Improved care has been achieved through continuing professional education, recruitment of volunteer obstetrician-gynecologists, advocacy, and close collaboration at the local and national levels. The inclusive and multifaceted approach of this program should provide an effective model for collaborations between specialty societies and health care professionals providing primary care services that can reduce health disparities in underserved populations.
PubMed ID
32925622 View in PubMed
Less detail

[337 home calls during daytime from the emergency medical center in Oslo]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30514
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Feb 5;124(3):354-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-5-2004
Author
Erling Iveland
Jørund Straand
Author Affiliation
Oslo kommunale legevakt, Storgata 40, 0182 Oslo. ovrefoss.14@c2i.net
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Feb 5;124(3):354-7
Date
Feb-5-2004
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
English Abstract
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
House Calls - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Physicians, Family
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Few studies have addressed physicians' home calls in Norway. The aim of this study is to analyse home calls during daytime in Oslo in relation to patients (age, sex, district), diagnoses, request procedures, and clinical outcome. METHODS AND MATERIAL: General practitioners in the City of Oslo emergency medical centre recorded their home calls during three months using a standardised form. RESULTS: Calls to 337 patients (mean age 70, median 77 years; two thirds females; seven to children below two years of age) were recorded. The home calls were requested by relatives (36%), the patients themselves (32%), community care nurses (11%), and nursing homes (7%). The assessments made by the operators of the medical emergency telephone were generally correct. Physicians reported 77% full and 20% partial match between reported and found medical problem. The physicians assessed that 22% of the patients would have been able to go and see a doctor. 39% of all patients were admitted to hospital, 34 % needed ambulance transportation. The admitting GPs received hospital reports only after 27% of admissions. INTERPRETATION: Access to acute home calls by a physician during daytime is a necessary function in an urban public health service.
PubMed ID
14963510 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 1925 Diphtheria Antitoxin Run to Nome - Alaska: A Public Health Illustration of Human-Animal Collaboration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310761
Source
J Med Humanit. 2019 Sep; 40(3):287-296
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2019
Author
Basil H Aboul-Enein
William C Puddy
Jacquelyn E Bowser
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Health & Development, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, 15-17 Tavistock Place, London, WC1H 9SH, UK. Basil.Aboul-Enein@lshtm.ac.uk.
Source
J Med Humanit. 2019 Sep; 40(3):287-296
Date
Sep-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Diphtheria Antitoxin - history
Dogs
Health Services Accessibility
History, 20th Century
Humans
Public Health
Abstract
Diphtheria is an acute toxin-mediated superficial infection of the respiratory tract or skin caused by the aerobic gram-positive bacillus Corynebacterium diphtheriae. The epidemiology of infection and clinical manifestations of the disease vary in different parts of the world. Historical accounts of diphtheria epidemics have been described in many parts of the world since antiquity. Developed in the late 19th century, the diphtheria antitoxin (DAT) played a pivotal role in the history of public health and vaccinology prior to the advent of the diphtheria-tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine. One of the most significant demonstrations of the importance of DAT was its use in the 1925 diphtheria epidemic of Nome, Alaska. Coordinated emergency delivery of this life-saving antitoxin by dog-sled relay in the harshest of conditions has left a profound legacy in the annals of vaccinology and public health. Lead dogs Balto and Togo, and the dog-led antitoxin run of 1925 represent a dynamic illustration of the contribution made by non-human species towards mass immunization in the history of vaccinology. This unique example of cooperative interspecies fellowship and collaboration highlights the importance of the human-animal bond in the one-health initiative.
PubMed ID
28032302 View in PubMed
Less detail

1933-2003: lessons from 70 years of experience with mental health, capacity and consent legislation in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179705
Source
Health Law Can. 2004 Apr;24(3):36-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004

The 2006 Canadian dyslipidemia guidelines will prevent more deaths while treating fewer people--but should they be further modified?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155805
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Aug;24(8):617-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Douglas G Manuel
Sarah Wilson
Sarah Maaten
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. doug.manuel@ices.on.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Aug;24(8):617-20
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Coronary Artery Disease - genetics - mortality - prevention & control
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Dyslipidemias - drug therapy - genetics - mortality
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
When clinical guidelines affect large numbers of individuals or substantial resources, it is important to understand their benefits, harms and costs from a population perspective. Many countries' dyslipidemia guidelines include these perspectives.
To compare the effectiveness and efficiency of the 2003 and 2006 Canadian dyslipidemia guidelines for statin treatment in reducing deaths from coronary artery disease (CAD) in the Canadian population.
The 2003 and 2006 Canadian dyslipidemia guidelines were applied to data from the Canadian Heart Health Survey (weighted sample of 12,300,000 people), which includes information on family history and physical measurements, including fasting lipid profiles. The number of people recommended for statin treatment, the potential number of CAD deaths avoided and the number needed to treat to avoid one CAD death with five years of statin therapy were determined for each guideline.
Compared with the 2003 guidelines, 1.4% fewer people (20 to 74 years of age) are recommended statin treatment, potentially preventing 7% more CAD deaths. The number needed to treat to prevent one CAD death over five years decreased from 172 (2003 guideline) to 147 (2006 guideline).
From a population perspective, the 2006 Canadian dyslipidemia recommendations are an improvement of earlier versions, preventing more CAD events and deaths with fewer statin prescriptions. Despite these improvements, the Canadian dyslipidemia recommendations should explicitly address issues of absolute benefit and cost-effectiveness in future revisions.
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2005 Apr 12;172(8):1027-3115824409
Cites: Heart. 2005 Dec;91 Suppl 5:v1-5216365341
Cites: BMJ. 2006 Mar 18;332(7542):659-6216543339
Cites: BMJ. 2006 Jun 17;332(7555):141916737980
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 Sep;22(11):913-2716971976
Cites: Lancet. 2007 Jan 20;369(9557):168-917240267
Comment In: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Aug;24(8):62118697284
PubMed ID
18685741 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2012 SAGE wait times program: Survey of Access to GastroEnterology in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115731
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2013 Feb;27(2):83-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Desmond Leddin
David Armstrong
Mark Borgaonkar
Ronald J Bridges
Carlo A Fallone
Jennifer J Telford
Ying Chen
Palma Colacino
Paul Sinclair
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2013 Feb;27(2):83-9
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Colonoscopy - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gastroenterology - statistics & numerical data - trends
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Periodically surveying wait times for specialist health services in Canada captures current data and enables comparisons with previous surveys to identify changes over time.
During one week in April 2012, Canadian gastroenterologists were asked to complete a questionnaire (online or by fax) recording demographics, reason for referral, and dates of referral and specialist visits for at least 10 consecutive new patients (five consultations and five procedures) who had not been seen previously for the same indication. Wait times were determined for 18 indications and compared with those from similar surveys conducted in 2008 and 2005.
Data regarding adult patients were provided by 173 gastroenterologists for 1374 consultations, 540 procedures and 293 same-day consultations and procedures. Nationally, the median wait times were 92 days (95% CI 85 days to 100 days) from referral to consultation, 55 days (95% CI 50 days to 61 days) from consultation to procedure and 155 days (95% CI 142 days to 175 days) (total) from referral to procedure. Overall, wait times were longer in 2012 than in 2005 (P
Notes
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2006 Jun;20(6):411-2316779459
Cites: Colorectal Dis. 2006 Jul;8(6):480-316784466
Cites: Am J Gastroenterol. 2007 Mar;102(3):478-8117335442
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2008 Feb;22(2):155-6018299734
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2008 Feb;22(2):161-718299735
Cites: Healthc Q. 2009;12(3):72-919553768
Cites: Health Manag Technol. 2012 Mar;33(3):12-322515048
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2010 Jan;24(1):33-920186354
Cites: Qual Saf Health Care. 2010 Oct;19(5):e2720584706
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2011 Feb;25(2):78-8221321678
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2011 Oct;25(10):547-5422059159
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2012 Jan;26(1):17-3122308578
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2010 Jan;24(1):20-520186352
PubMed ID
23472243 View in PubMed
Less detail

3394 records – page 1 of 340.