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195 records – page 1 of 20.

[Absorption kinetics of C14-GABA and its vitamin B conjugates in isolated bovine retina]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50806
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2001;47(4):63-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
Z A Rozanova
Author Affiliation
Institute of Eye Diseases and Tissue Therapy named by Filatov, AMS of Ukraine, Odessa.
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2001;47(4):63-6
Date
2001
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorption
Animals
Carbon Radioisotopes - metabolism
Cattle
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
English Abstract
Kinetics
Male
Retina - metabolism
Time Factors
Vitamin B Complex - chemistry - metabolism
gamma-Aminobutyric Acid - analogs & derivatives - pharmacokinetics
Abstract
Absorption by the bovine retina of physiological concentration of PLP-GABA increase clearing 2-32 minutes of incubation in difference of GABA and its non metabolic preparations, which store up as much as possible in first minutes: picamilon > PLP-GABA > GABA > panthogam > biotinil-GABA. Kinetics of transport of GABA and its preparations into retina has a complex character. By the growth of concentration from 33 mM to 528 mM, it is linear for picamilion, showing diffusion, and not linear for GABA, PLP-GABA and panthogam, showing differently systems of its transport. And only GABA transport is activated by Na-ions.
PubMed ID
11571926 View in PubMed
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[Absorption of ephedrine hydrochloride in the presence of auxiliary high-molecular compounds in the intestines of rats]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8855
Source
Farm Zh. 1978 Jan-Feb;(1):89
Publication Type
Article

Absorption of polychlorinated biphenyls, dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans by breast-fed infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59296
Source
Chemosphere. 1995 Jun;30(12):2297-306
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
P. Dahl
G. Lindström
K. Wiberg
C. Rappe
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Chemistry, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Chemosphere. 1995 Jun;30(12):2297-306
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorption
Benzofurans - metabolism
Body Burden
Breast Feeding
Comparative Study
Feces - chemistry
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Mass Fragmentography
Milk, human - chemistry
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Abstract
The absorption of polychlorinated biphenyls, dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans was studied in four breast-fed infants. The absorption was measured by comparing the estimated total intake and the excretion in faeces, during 48 hours, at three different time points; 1, 2 and 3 months post parta. The levels of the analysed compounds in the human milk are typical for Sweden, i.e approximately 20 ppt toxic equivalents for the dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans and for the polychlorinated biphenyls approximately 16 ppt toxic equivalents. For most of the congeners the absorption is found to be over 95%. Higher excretion is noticed for heptachlorinated and octachlorinated dioxins.
PubMed ID
7620852 View in PubMed
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The absorption of subcutaneously injected short-acting soluble insulin: influence of injection technique and concentration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48905
Source
Diabetes Care. 1983 Sep-Oct;6(5):459-62
Publication Type
Article
Author
P. Hildebrandt
L. Sestoft
S L Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Hvidøre Hospital, Klampenborg, Denmark.
Source
Diabetes Care. 1983 Sep-Oct;6(5):459-62
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorption
Adolescent
Adult
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - drug therapy - metabolism
Humans
Injections, Subcutaneous - methods
Insulin - administration & dosage - pharmacokinetics
Middle Aged
Temperature
Abstract
The effect of injection technique on the absorption of subcutaneously injected short-acting insulin [125I-labeled Actrapid (MC), Novo, Copenhagen, Denmark] was investigated in insulin-dependent diabetic patients. In one side of the abdomen insulin was given with a fixed standard technique. In the other side of the abdomen the temperature of the injected insulin, the depth of injection, and the duration of injection were varied. Furthermore, we compared the absorption of U40 and U100 insulin by giving either 8 U of the two insulins or 0.1 ml of both insulins simultaneously to the patients in either side of the abdomen. With regard to the injection technique the only significant finding was a faster absorption rate with deep (12 mm) than with superficial (3 mm) injection. The absorption of U100 insulin was significantly slower than of U40 insulin, when given in the same amount (8 U) as well as in the same volume (0.1 ml).
PubMed ID
6400706 View in PubMed
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Adaptation of Inuit children to a low-calcium diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4790
Source
CMAJ. 2003 Apr 29;168(9):1141-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-29-2003
Author
Elizabeth A C Sellers
Atul Sharma
Celia Rodd
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Man.
Source
CMAJ. 2003 Apr 29;168(9):1141-3
Date
Apr-29-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Adolescent
Calcium - metabolism - urine
Child
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Diet
Female
Humans
Intestinal Absorption
Inuits
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Vitamin D - metabolism
Abstract
For Inuit children, a traditional diet contains 20 mg of elemental calcium per day, well below the recommended daily intake. To identify alterations in intestinal or renal calcium absorption, 10 healthy Inuit children (5 to 17 years of age) were given a standardized calcium load (Pak test). Five had hypercalciuria (hyperabsorptive in 3 and renal leak in 2), a frequency markedly different from that for white children (p
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 2003 Sep 16;169(6):542; author reply 542-312975217
Erratum In: CMAJ. 2003 Sep 16;169(6):545
PubMed ID
12719317 View in PubMed
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Adjustment of iron intake for dietary enhancers and inhibitors in population studies: bioavailable iron in rural and urban residing Russian women and children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207882
Source
J Nutr. 1997 Aug;127(8):1456-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
M. Tseng
H. Chakraborty
D T Robinson
M. Mendez
L. Kohlmeier
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.
Source
J Nutr. 1997 Aug;127(8):1456-68
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Biological Availability
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases, Factual
Diet
Female
Heme - metabolism
Humans
Infant
Intestinal Absorption
Iron, Dietary - administration & dosage - pharmacokinetics
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Requirements
Rural Population
Russia
Urban Population
Abstract
Although determining iron intakes is essential in assessing adequacy of iron in the diet, estimating iron availability may be more useful for evaluating whether iron requirements are met. Our objectives were to describe the dietary information, analytical steps, and computer algorithms needed for iron bioavailability adjustments and to demonstrate the effects of various dietary factors on calculated iron absorption. Our study was based on 9890 women and children participating in the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey. Between August 1992 and February 1993, two 24-h recalls were collected from each participant, and total, heme and nonheme iron intakes were calculated. Nonheme iron availability was adjusted for meat, fish and poultry and vitamin C consumed in the same meal and then further adjusted for tea and phytates. We found mean total iron intakes to be comparable to those of women of reproductive age in the United States and lower than those of United States children. When these intakes were adjusted for enhancers and inhibitors of absorption, the iron bioavailability in these vulnerable Russian groups was extremely low. Mean bioavailable iron as well as the 25th-75th percentile ranges of intake were below the bottom of the range of requirements, indicating that iron adequacy in this population may be considerably less than expected based on total iron intakes alone. Furthermore, rural and urban food availability had a significant effect on iron bioavailability. Future research on dietary iron adequacy should be based on estimates of available iron by collecting meal-level dietary data and using detailed information on mixed dishes and phytates.
PubMed ID
9237938 View in PubMed
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Adrenal suppression in asthmatic children receiving low-dose inhaled budesonide: comparison between dry powder inhaler and pressurized metered-dose inhaler attached to a spacer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15304
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2002 Dec;89(6):566-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Shmuel Goldberg
Tsurit Einot
Nurit Algur
Shimshon Schwartz
Alan C Greenberg
Elie Picard
Dov Virgilis
Eitan Kerem
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatric Respiratory Medicine, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Hebrew University Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel.
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2002 Dec;89(6):566-71
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorption
Administration, Inhalation
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex - secretion
Aerosols
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - pharmacology
Biological Availability
Budesonide - administration & dosage - adverse effects - pharmacology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Cross-Over Studies
Depression, Chemical
Female
Humans
Hydrocortisone - secretion - urine
Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System - drug effects
Inhalation Spacers
Lung - metabolism
Male
Pituitary-Adrenal System - drug effects
Powders
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Dry powder inhalers (DPI) have in recent years become a common mode for administration of inhaled corticosteroids for preventive therapy of asthma. Inhaled steroids delivered by DPI achieve increased lung deposition compared with pressurized metered-dose inhalers (pMDI), which is associated with increased therapeutic effect. This may be associated with increased systemic absorption. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of adrenal suppression in children using low-dose budesonide given by DPI, as compared with pMDI attached to a large-volume spacer device (pMDI + spacer). METHODS: In an open-labeled crossover study, 15 asthmatic children aged 5 to 15 years received 200 microg of inhaled budesonide twice daily by DPI (Turbuhaler, Astra, Draco AB, Lund, Sweden) and by pMDI + spacer, 1 month each, in a randomized order. Twenty-four-hour urine collections were performed at baseline and at the end of each of the 2 months of the study period, and urinary cortisol and creatinine were measured. RESULTS: Baseline urinary cortisol:creatinine was 0.038 +/- 0.012 microg/mg, similar in both groups. After 1 month of DPI therapy, urinary cortisol:creatinine was reduced by 27 +/- 16% to 0.028 +/- 0.012 microg/mg (P = 0.018). Urinary cortisol:creatinine after 1 month of pMDI + spacer therapy was similar to baseline 0.037 +/- 0.019 microg/mg (P = 0.78). CONCLUSIONS: Treatment of asthmatic children with budesonide 400 microg daily given via a DPI for 1 month was associated with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis suppression. This effect was not observed with the same dose of budesonide administered via pMDI + spacer. This indicates that systemic absorption might be reduced with pMDI + spacer therapy.
Notes
Comment In: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2002 Dec;89(6):537-912487216
Comment In: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2003 Jun;90(6):674; author reply 674-512839330
PubMed ID
12487221 View in PubMed
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195 records – page 1 of 20.