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70 records – page 1 of 7.

Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1979 Nov;24(7):589-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1979
Author
S M Smith
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1979 Nov;24(7):589-91
Date
Nov-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - psychology
Canada
Child
Child Abuse - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Object Attachment
Pregnancy
PubMed ID
519624 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abortion counseling in a general hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247205
Source
Health Soc Work. 1979 May;4(2):92-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1979
Author
B A Kaminsky
L A Sheckter
Source
Health Soc Work. 1979 May;4(2):92-103
Date
May-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - psychology
British Columbia
Counseling - methods
Female
Hospitals, General
Humans
Politics
Pregnancy
Abstract
Given the increase in the number of abortions being performed in hospitals throughout the United States and Canada, there is an obvious need for counseling programs for these patients. The authors describe one such program, and emphasize the importance of close working relationships between the counselors and their supervising staff.
PubMed ID
488841 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abortion in Canada: religious and ideological dimensions of women's attitudes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227544
Source
Soc Biol. 1991 Fall-Winter;38(3-4):249-57
Publication Type
Article
Author
V. Krishnan
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Soc Biol. 1991 Fall-Winter;38(3-4):249-57
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - psychology
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude
Canada
Family Characteristics
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Marriage
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Religion and Psychology
Abstract
This paper examines a number of demographic and sociocultural factors (e.g., age, marital status, family size, religion, religious assiduity, sex-role ideology) as predictors of women's attitudes toward abortion, using data from the Canadian Fertility Survey of 1984. The findings suggest that women's abortion attitudes are to a greater extent based on ideological positions. It appears that anti-abortion stance affects those women who are religious, presumably by increasing the relationship between their general sex-role ideological stances and abortion attitudes. Abortion attitudes also vary according to a woman's education, her size, and province/region of residence.
PubMed ID
1801205 View in PubMed
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Acceptance of screening and abortion for Down syndrome among Finnish midwives and public health nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200072
Source
Prenat Diagn. 1999 Nov;19(11):1015-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
P. Jallinoja
P. Santalahti
H. Toiviainen
E. Hemminki
Author Affiliation
Health Services Research Unit, National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health, Helsinki, Finland. piia@jallinoja@helsinki.fi
Source
Prenat Diagn. 1999 Nov;19(11):1015-22
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - psychology
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Down Syndrome - diagnosis
Female
Finland
Humans
Middle Aged
Nurse Midwives
Pregnancy
Prenatal Diagnosis - psychology
Public health nursing
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Abstract
In this study we evaluated how well maternal serum screening and abortions for Down syndrome were accepted among midwives and public health nurses, and compared how those who accepted and did not accept abortions for Down syndrome differed from each other. The questionnaire was mailed in 1998 to 400 midwives and 400 public health nurses. 79 per cent responded. The majority said that all pregnant women should be offered a screening test for Down syndrome, but less than half accepted abortion for Down syndrome. Thus, the 'informative part' of the screening (serum screening itself) is supported more often than the 'operative part' (selective abortion)-or at least the 'operative part' was found to be a more difficult question. We suggest that whereas screening may be perceived as a question of more choices, information and self-determination, abortion is more clearly a moral question. The professional background characteristics and attitudes of those accepting and not accepting abortion for Down syndrome were relatively similar, but having a midwife's education, practical involvement in serum screening and having patients with Down syndrome were associated with a somewhat higher percentage of acceptance and a lower percentage of 'don't know' responses.
PubMed ID
10589051 View in PubMed
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[Adolescents' wishes to have children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36603
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Sep 7;154(37):2493-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-7-1992
Author
U M Hansen
H B Wielandt
Author Affiliation
Odense Universitet, Institut for Sygdomsforebyggelse og Helsetjenesteforskning.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Sep 7;154(37):2493-6
Date
Sep-7-1992
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - psychology
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Psychology
Attitude
Contraception Behavior - psychology
Denmark
English Abstract
Family Planning Services - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Parenting - psychology
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - psychology
Abstract
During the period 1984-1986, an investigation concerning sexual behaviour, contraceptive methods and pregnancies was performed among Danes aged 16-20 years in Denmark. A random sample consisting of 286 women (respondent rate = 75.3) and 336 men (respondent rate = 79.6) was interviewed by the Institute of Social Research. During the same time interval, 140 women admitted for legal termination of pregnancy in the County of Funen (respondent rate = 73.6) replied to a corresponding questionnaire. Some results have been published previously (4-6). This paper present results concerning the number of children the adolescents wish to have in the future and the age at which they want to become parents. A remarkable correspondence in the replies was found. The majority, including the women admitted for termination of pregnancy, the non-pregnant women and the young men, want to have two to three children. The majority, however, would prefer to have children when they themselves were between 20 and 30 years of age. In all, 62.9% (n = 171) of the non-pregnant women and 54.5% (n = 181) of the men would choose or advise application for legal termination, in the case of pregnancy. The women admitted for termination of pregnancy were asked to give priority to ten preformulated attitudes and their importance for the choice made when applying for abortion. A total of 70.5% (n = 93) replied that the formulation "It is too early for me to have a child" was of great importance for their choice, while the financial situation, housing problems and the possibility of being a single mother had lower priorities.
PubMed ID
1413174 View in PubMed
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The adoption of emergency contraceptive pills in Sweden: a repeated cross-sectional study among abortion applicants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80966
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2006;85(9):1142-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006

Attitudes towards abortion among physicians working at obstetrical and paediatric departments in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205863
Source
Prenat Diagn. 1998 Mar;18(3):273-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
M. Norup
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Philosophy and Clinical Theory, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Prenat Diagn. 1998 Mar;18(3):273-80
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - psychology
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Obstetrics - statistics & numerical data
Pediatrics - statistics & numerical data
Physicians - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Pilot Projects
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Social Class
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe the attitudes among physicians working in perinatal medicine towards abortion for social reasons or because of abnormal prenatal diagnostic results. A questionnaire was sent to all physicians registered as employed at obstetrical or paediatric departments in Danish hospitals with a neonatal function. Of 994 questionnaires, 687 (69 per cent) were completed and returned. There was strong consensus among all participants that abortion is acceptable until week 21 in the case of trisomy 13 and at least until week 19 in the case of cystic fibrosis. Furthermore, there was strong consensus that abortion in the first trimester is acceptable in the case of an unwanted pregnancy in a 16-year-old girl and in the case of Down syndrome. Major controversy was found in connection with abortion in the case of Turner syndrome until week 21, abortion in week 13 in the case of polycystic kidney disease, abortion in week 24 in the case of Down syndrome, and abortion for social reasons in week 21.
PubMed ID
9556044 View in PubMed
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Canadian regulation of the medical use of fetal tissue in research and therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230889
Source
CMAJ. 1989 May 1;140(9):1021-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-1989
Author
T D Marshall
Source
CMAJ. 1989 May 1;140(9):1021-2
Date
May-1-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - psychology
Canada
Ethics, Medical
Female
Fetus
Human Experimentation
Humans
Pregnancy
Tissue and Organ Procurement - legislation & jurisprudence
United States
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 1988 Jun 3;259(21):30993270505
PubMed ID
2706589 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can the outcome of the next pregnancy be predicted at the time of induced abortion?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153484
Source
Hum Reprod. 2009 Apr;24(4):820-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Oskari Heikinheimo
Mika Gissler
Satu Suhonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Helsinki, PO Box 140, SF-00029, HUS, Finland. oskari.heikinheimo@helsinki.fi
Source
Hum Reprod. 2009 Apr;24(4):820-6
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Age Factors
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intrauterine Devices - utilization
Multivariate Analysis
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology - psychology
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Factors predicting the outcome of the next pregnancy following termination of pregnancy (TOP) are poorly known.
A cohort of 1269 women undergoing medical TOP between 2000 and 2002 were followed up until the next pregnancy or until the end of 2006, using registers of induced abortion, births and hospital discharges. Factors associated with repeat TOP, delivery and failed pregnancy were analysed.
During the mean (+/-SD) follow-up period of 4.2 +/- 1.5 years, 446 (35%) women had at least one subsequent pregnancy. Of these, 207 (46%) resulted in delivery, 169 (38%) in repeat TOP and 16% in failed pregnancy. In multivariate analysis, parity [hazard ratio (HR) 3.42, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.70-6.91] and history of TOP (HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.10-2.33) were risk factors of repeat TOP. Age above 25 years (HR
PubMed ID
19109310 View in PubMed
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70 records – page 1 of 7.