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Abortion, breast cancer, and epidemiology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22237
Source
N Engl J Med. 1997 Jan 9;336(2):127-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-9-1997

Abortions and breast cancer: record-based case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18717
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 Feb 20;103(5):676-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-20-2003
Author
Gunnar Erlandsson
Scott M Montgomery
Sven Cnattingius
Anders Ekbom
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Gunnar.Erlandsson@mep.ki.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 Feb 20;103(5):676-9
Date
Feb-20-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - adverse effects
Abortion, Spontaneous
Adolescent
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Medical Records
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
It has been suggested that abortions leave the breast epithelium in a proliferative state with an increased susceptibility to carcinogenesis. Results from previous studies of induced or spontaneous abortions and risk of subsequent breast cancer are contradictory, probably due to methodological considerations. We investigated the relationship between abortions and subsequent breast cancer risk in a case-control study using prospectively recorded exposure information. The study population comprised women recorded in the population-based Swedish Medical Birth Register between 1973-91. Cases were defined by linkage of the birth register to the Swedish Cancer Register and controls were randomly selected from the birth register. From the subjects' antenatal care records we abstracted prospectively collected information on induced and spontaneous abortions, as well as a number of potential confounding factors. Relative risk of breast cancer was estimated by odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). A reduced risk of breast cancer was observed for women with a history of at least 1 compared to no abortions (adjusted OR = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.72-0.99). The adjusted OR decreases step-wise with number of abortions to 0.59 (95% CI = 0.34-1.03) for 3 or more compared to no abortions. The patterns are similar for induced and spontaneous abortions. In conclusion, neither a history of induced nor spontaneous abortions is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Our data suggest a protective effect of pregnancies regardless of outcome.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Cancer. 2004 May 10;109(6):945-6; author reply 947-815027130
PubMed ID
12494478 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Abortions in 1973 in Linköping--contraceptive technics and postoperative complications]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66253
Source
Lakartidningen. 1975 Oct 29;72(44):4282-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-29-1975
Author
U. Larsson-Cohn
Source
Lakartidningen. 1975 Oct 29;72(44):4282-4
Date
Oct-29-1975
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - adverse effects
Abortion, Legal
Adolescent
Adult
Contraceptive Agents
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Sweden
Abstract
A study is presented of 283 women aged 14-47 who had abortions, with emphasis on contraceptive methods used at conception and complications of the abortion. 28% of the women were under 20 years of age, and 45% were nulliparae. 76% of the abortions were performed by vacuum aspiration, with a complication frequency of 9%. Extraamniotic salt water instillation was performed in 18% of the cases, with 43% of the patients experiencing complications. Intraamniotic salt water instillation was performed with 6% of the women, with a 25% complication frequency. These complication figures are comparable to other studies. The lack of reliable contraceptive protection at the time of conception is discussed. Approximately 33% of the women had used no form of contraceptive, and approximately 33% had used the condom as the only means of contraception. It is considered very important to make contraceptive information more available so contraceptive methods are used more often.
PubMed ID
1186373 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Analysis of the sequelae of induced abortion (based on the clinical data of the V.I. Lenin Kazan Institute for the Training of Physicians)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232121
Source
Akush Ginekol (Mosk). 1988 Dec;(12):52-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1988

Birth outcomes after induced abortion: a nationwide register-based study of first births in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121150
Source
Hum Reprod. 2012 Nov;27(11):3315-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
R. Klemetti
M. Gissler
M. Niinimäki
E. Hemminki
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), PO Box 30, 00271 Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Hum Reprod. 2012 Nov;27(11):3315-20
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - adverse effects
Adult
Developed Countries
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Male
Parity
Patient Education as Topic
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Premature Birth - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Reoperation - adverse effects
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Is the perinatal health of first-born children affected by the mother's previous induced abortion(s) (IAs)?
Prior IAs, particularly repeat IAs, are correlated with an increased risk of some health problems at first birth; even in a country with good health care quality.
A positive association between IA and risk of preterm birth or a dose-response effect has been found in some previous studies. Limited information and conflicting results on other infant outcomes are available.
Nationwide register-based study including 300 858 first-time mothers during 1996-2008 in Finland.
All the first-time mothers with a singleton birth (obtained from the Medical Birth Register) in the period 1996-2008 (n = 300 858) were linked to the Abortion Register for the period 1983-2008.
Of the first-time mothers, 10.3% (n = 31 083) had one, 1.5% had two and 0.3% had three or more IAs. Most IAs were surgical (88%) performed before 12 weeks (91%) and carried out for social reasons (97%). After adjustment, perinatal deaths and very preterm birth (
PubMed ID
22933527 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2005 May;27(5):491-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Robert H Lea
Author Affiliation
SOGC/GOC Joint Ad Hoc Committee On Breast Cancer
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2005 May;27(5):491-2
Date
May-2005
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - adverse effects
Abortion, Spontaneous - complications
Breast Neoplasms - etiology
Canada
Female
Gynecology
Humans
Obstetrics
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Societies, Medical
PubMed ID
16100645 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Characteristics of 2829 women who obtained an abortion at the Family Planning Clinic at the Laval University Hospital Center].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221960
Source
Can J Public Health. 1993 Jan-Feb;84(1):28-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
E. Guilbert
Author Affiliation
Département de Santé Communautaire, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université Laval, Sainte-Foy, Québec.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1993 Jan-Feb;84(1):28-30
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data - trends
Adolescent
Adult
Educational Status
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Marital status
Maternal Age
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Parity
Quebec
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Residence Characteristics
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Induced abortion rates have remained stable in Canada for the last ten years, while, in Quebec, they have been on the rise since 1970. This descriptive study was performed in a family planning clinic in Quebec City where induced abortion is available on demand until 16 weeks of gestational age and was obtained by 2,829 women over a period of 20 months during 1988-90. These women were mostly young unmarried and well educated; being at school or in the workforce, they used abortion to postpone childbearing. This study underlines the need for a better understanding of the determinants of both induced abortion and contraceptive use and of the psychosocial aspects of induced abortion.
PubMed ID
8500053 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clostridium sordellii toxic shock syndrome after medical abortion with mifepristone and intravaginal misoprostol--United States and Canada, 2001-2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173601
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2005 Jul 29;54(29):724
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-29-2005
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2005 Jul 29;54(29):724
Date
Jul-29-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortifacient Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Abortion, Induced - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Clostridium Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Clostridium sordellii
Female
Humans
Mifepristone - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Misoprostol - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Shock, Septic - epidemiology - etiology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
On July 19, 2005, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a public health advisory regarding the deaths of four women in the United States after medical abortions with Mifeprex (mifepristone, formerly RU-486; Danco Laboratories, New York, New York) and intravaginal misoprostol. Two of these deaths occurred in 2003, one in 2004, and one in 2005. Two of these U.S. cases had clinical illness consistent with toxic shock and had evidence of endometrial infection with Clostridium sordellii, a gram-positive, toxin-forming anaerobic bacteria. In addition, a fatal case of C. sordellii toxic shock syndrome after medical abortion with mifepristone and misoprostol was reported in 2001, in Canada. All three cases of C. sordellii infection were notable for lack of fever, and all had refractory hypotension, multiple effusions, hemoconcentration, and a profound leukocytosis. C. sordellii previously has been described as a cause of pregnancy-associated toxic shock syndrome.
PubMed ID
16049422 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of rates of adverse events in adolescent and adult women undergoing medical abortion: population register based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135125
Source
BMJ. 2011;342:d2111
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Maarit Niinimäki
Satu Suhonen
Maarit Mentula
Elina Hemminki
Oskari Heikinheimo
Mika Gissler
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital of Oulu, Finland.
Source
BMJ. 2011;342:d2111
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortifacient Agents, Nonsteroidal - adverse effects
Abortifacient Agents, Steroidal - adverse effects
Abortion, Incomplete - epidemiology
Abortion, Induced - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hemorrhage - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Mifepristone - adverse effects
Misoprostol - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - etiology
Registries
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To determine the risks of short term adverse events in adolescent and older women undergoing medical abortion.
Population based retrospective cohort study.
Finnish abortion register 2000-6.
All women (n = 27,030) undergoing medical abortion during 2000-6, with only the first induced abortion analysed for each woman.
Incidence of adverse events (haemorrhage, infection, incomplete abortion, surgical evacuation, psychiatric morbidity, injury, thromboembolic disease, and death) among adolescent (
Notes
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Cites: Duodecim. 2001;117(20):2084-9412183922
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2003 Aug;57(8):601-512883066
Cites: Contraception. 2004 Sep;70(3):183-9015325886
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Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1996 Apr;25(2):376-809119563
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2005 Oct;106(4):684-9216199622
Cites: Contraception. 2007 Mar;75(3):224-917303494
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2008;(1):CD00671418254113
Cites: Contraception. 2008 Aug;78(2):149-5418672117
Cites: Reprod Health Matters. 2008 May;16(31 Suppl):162-7218772097
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2009 Apr;113(4):845-5219305329
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Jul 9;361(2):145-5119587339
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2010 Mar;115(3):660; author reply 660-120177301
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2010 Aug;116(2 Pt 1):419-2820664404
Cites: Perspect Sex Reprod Health. 2010 Dec;42(4):230-521126298
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2011 Jan 27;364(4):332-921268725
Comment In: Evid Based Med. 2012 Feb;17(1):30-121727240
Comment In: BMJ. 2011;342:d319721610061
Comment In: BMJ. 2011;342:d218521508043
PubMed ID
21508042 View in PubMed
Less detail

92 records – page 1 of 10.