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59 records – page 1 of 6.

[4 years after Chernobyl: medical repercussions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25355
Source
Bull Cancer. 1990;77(5):419-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
D. Hubert
Source
Bull Cancer. 1990;77(5):419-28
Date
1990
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Abortion, Habitual - epidemiology
Blood Cell Count
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Decontamination - methods
Diarrhea - etiology
English Abstract
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
Nuclear Reactors
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Psychophysiologic Disorders - etiology
Pulmonary Fibrosis - etiology
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries - complications - epidemiology - therapy
Skin - radiation effects
Triage
Ukraine
Abstract
The nuclear accident at Chernobyl accounted for an acute radiation syndrome in 237 persons on the site. Triage was the initial problem and was carried out according to clinical and biological criteria; evaluating the doses received was based on these criteria. Thirty one persons died and only 1 survived a dose higher than 6 Gy. Skin radiation burns which were due to inadequate decontamination, greatly worsened prognosis. The results of 13 bone marrow transplantations were disappointing, with only 2 survivors. Some time after the accident, these severely irradiated patients are mainly suffering from psychosomatic disorders, in the USSR, some areas have been significantly contaminated and several measures were taken to mitigate the impact on population: evacuating 135,000 persons, distributing prophylactic iodine, establishing standards and controls on foodstuff. Radiation phobia syndrome which developed in many persons, is the only sanitary effect noticed up to now. Finally, in Europe, there was only an increase in induced abortions and this was totally unwarranted. If we consider the risk of radiation induced cancer, an effect might not be demonstrated.
PubMed ID
2205311 View in PubMed
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[20-year morpholoogical findings in the study of medical aftereffects of the Chernobyl accident]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82012
Source
Arkh Patol. 2006 Mar-Apr;68(2):3-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lushnikov E F
Source
Arkh Patol. 2006 Mar-Apr;68(2):3-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Accidents, Radiation - mortality
Byelarus
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Power Plants
Radiation Dosage
Russia
Time Factors
Ukraine
Abstract
Presented are the results of morphological studies of radiation sickness, congenital malformations and malignant tumors which have developed in Chemobyl victims. Until now consequences of the accident remain a subject of practical and research medicine. Scope of relevant topical problems the pathologists will have to investigate in the future is discussed.
PubMed ID
16752499 View in PubMed
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The accident at Chernobyl and outcome of pregnancy in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38150
Source
BMJ. 1989 Apr 15;298(6679):995-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1989
Author
T. Harjulehto
T. Aro
H. Rita
T. Rytömaa
L. Saxén
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
BMJ. 1989 Apr 15;298(6679):995-7
Date
Apr-15-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Accidents
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Geography
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Nuclear Reactors
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Time Factors
Ukraine
Abstract
OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the outcome of pregnancy in Finnish women after the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant on 26 April 1986. DESIGN--Geographic and temporal cohort study. SETTING--Finland divided into three zones according to amount of radioactive fallout. SUBJECTS--All children who were exposed to radiation during their fetal development. Children born before any effects of the accident could be postulated--that is, between 1 January 1984 and 30 June 1986--served as controls. INTERVENTIONS--Children were divided into three temporal groups: controls, children who were expected to be born in August to December 1986, and children who were expected to be born in February to December 1987. They were also divided, separately, into three groups according to the three geographic zones. END POINT--Incidence of congenital malformations, preterm births, and perinatal deaths. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--There were no significant differences in the incidence of malformations or perinatal deaths among the three temporal and three geographic groups. A significant increase in preterm births occurred among children who were exposed to radiation during the first trimester whose mothers lived in zones 2 and 3, where the external dose rate and estimated surface activity of caesium-137 were highest. CONCLUSIONS--The results suggest that the amount of radioactive fallout that Finnish people were exposed to after the accident at Chernobyl was not high enough to cause fetal damage in children born at term. The higher incidence of premature births among malformed children in the most heavily polluted areas, however, remains unexplained.
Notes
Comment In: BMJ. 1989 May 20;298(6684):13842502266
PubMed ID
2499391 View in PubMed
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Birth defects in Norway by levels of external and food-based exposure to radiation from Chernobyl.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59591
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Aug 15;136(4):377-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-1992
Author
R T Lie
L M Irgens
R. Skjaerven
J B Reitan
P. Strand
T. Strand
Author Affiliation
Medical Birth Registry of Norway, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Aug 15;136(4):377-88
Date
Aug-15-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Accidents
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Down Syndrome - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Food Contamination, Radioactive - analysis
Humans
Hydrocephalus - epidemiology - etiology
Infant, Newborn
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Nuclear Reactors
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ukraine
Abstract
In Norway, external doses of radiation resulting from fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear accident were estimated from detailed measurements, including soil deposition patterns. Internal doses were estimated from measurements of radioactive cesium in meat and milk supplies. The doses were calculated as average monthly doses for each of 454 municipalities during 36 consecutive months after the accident in spring 1986. Prospectively collected data on all newborns listed in the Medical Birth Registry of Norway who were conceived in the period May 1983-April 1989 were used to assess possible dose-response relations between estimated external and food-based exposures and congenital malformations and some other conditions. A positive association was observed between total radiation dose (external plus food-based) and hydrocephaly, while a negative association was observed for Down's syndrome. However, an important conclusion of the study was that no associations were found for conditions previously reported to be associated with radiation, i.e., small head circumference, congenital cataracts, anencephaly, spina bifida, and low birth weight. Potential sources of bias, including exposure misclassification and incomplete ascertainment of cases, are discussed.
PubMed ID
1415157 View in PubMed
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Birth prevalence of congenital malformations in Bavaria, Germany, after the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59244
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 1995 Dec;11(6):621-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1995
Author
C. Irl
A. Schoetzau
F. van Santen
B. Grosche
Author Affiliation
Institute for Radiation Hygiene, Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Neuherberg, Germany.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 1995 Dec;11(6):621-5
Date
Dec-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Accidents, Radiation
Germany - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Odds Ratio
Population Surveillance
Power Plants
Prevalence
Radioactive Pollutants - adverse effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ukraine
Abstract
This study considers whether or not exposure to radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl accident led to an increased prevalence of congenital malformations in infants born in Bavaria, the German state with the highest levels of contamination after the accident. The odds ratios for major malformations after the accident relative to before were used as indicators for adverse health effects. Since measurements of caesium in soil showed that contamination was considerably higher in Southern Bavaria than in Northern Bavaria, the odds ratios were calculated for both regions separately. Analysis did not show a significant increase in any of the odds ratios of the selected malformations in Southern Bavaria as compared to Northern Bavaria. Consequently, this study provides no evidence that radiation from Chernobyl caused an increase in the birth prevalence of major congenital malformations.
PubMed ID
8861844 View in PubMed
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Chernobyl, low-dose radiation, and trisomy 21: possibly something to worry about.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59197
Source
Eur J Pediatr. 1996 Jul;155(7):612-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1996
Author
K E von Mühlendahl
K. Muck
Author Affiliation
Dokumentations- und Informationszentrum für Umweltfragen, Akademie für Kinderheikunde und Jugendmedizin, Kinderhospital, Osnabrück, Germany.
Source
Eur J Pediatr. 1996 Jul;155(7):612-4
Date
Jul-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - genetics
Accidents, Radiation
Down Syndrome - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Meiosis - radiation effects
Nondisjunction, Genetic
Power Plants
Ukraine - epidemiology
PubMed ID
8831088 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Cleft lip and cleft palate birth rate in Bavaria before and after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58291
Source
Mund Kiefer Gesichtschir. 2004 Mar;8(2):106-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
H. Scherb
E. Weigelt
Author Affiliation
GSF-Forschungszentrum für Umwelt und Gesundheit, Neuherberg. scherb@gsf.de
Source
Mund Kiefer Gesichtschir. 2004 Mar;8(2):106-10
Date
Mar-2004
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Accidents, Radiation
Cleft Lip - epidemiology
Cleft Palate - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
English Abstract
Female
Germany
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Power Plants
Pregnancy
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Topography, Medical
Ukraine
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Cleft lip and palates (CLP) occur with a frequency of between 1 and 2 cases in 1000 live births and thus belong to the most frequent congenital anomalies. In the former German Democratic Republic (GDR), records covering 1967-1989 for CLP newborns show a 9.4% increase of the prevalence of CLP from 1987 to 1989, possibly due to Chernobyl. DATA AND STATISTICAL METHOD: In Bavaria, all congenital malformations in children's hospitals have been recorded from 1984 to 1991. Among these data, 1324 cases with CLP were found. A spatial-temporal analysis aimed at uncovering a possible association of the CLP occurrence with the Chernobyl fallout on a district level, as well as a synoptic analysis of the GDR and Bavarian data, were carried out. RESULTS: In Bavaria, from October 1986 to December 1990, the CLP frequency increased by 9.5% (p=0.10) relative to the trend as computed from the remaining years. The association of CLP rates with fallout on a district level is reflected by a significant relative risk (RR) per kBq/m(2) of RR=1.008 (p=0.03). A synoptic analysis of the Bavarian data and the GDR data restricted to the overlapping time window from 1984 to 1989 discloses a simultaneous significant jump of the CLP prevalence by 8.6% (p=0.02) after 1986. CONCLUSION: The presumption of a long-term increase of CLP after exposure to Chernobyl fallout is corroborated by the analysis of the Bavarian congenital malformation data.
PubMed ID
15045533 View in PubMed
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Congenital anomalies of the central nervous system at autopsy in Croatia in the period before and after the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58967
Source
Acta Med Croatica. 1998;52(2):103-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
B. Kruslin
S. Jukic
M. Kos
G. Simic
A. Cviko
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, Croatia.
Source
Acta Med Croatica. 1998;52(2):103-7
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Accidents, Radiation
Autopsy
Central Nervous System - abnormalities
Croatia - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Male
Power Plants
Ukraine
Abstract
In this study, we analyzed the frequency, type and sex distribution of congenital anomalies of the central nervous system (CNS) at autopsy in the period prior to and after the Chernobyl accident in northwest Croatia, one of the areas with the highest exposure to nuclear contamination from Chernobyl. All autopsies in both periods were performed by the same technique, i.e. dissection of the trunk and head, and inspection of the extremities. There were 53 infants with congenital anomalies of the CNS in the period prior to, and 99 in the period after the Chernobyl accident. Our results showed a statistically significant increase in the incidence of CNS anomalies in general (chi 2 = 4,719, p
PubMed ID
9682497 View in PubMed
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59 records – page 1 of 6.