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Abdominal injuries in a low trauma volume hospital--a descriptive study from northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264480
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2014;22:48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Patrik Pekkari
Per-Olof Bylund
Hans Lindgren
Mikael Öman
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2014;22:48
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Adolescent
Adult
Disease Management
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospital Mortality - trends
Hospitals, Low-Volume - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Injury Severity Score
Length of Stay - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Trauma Centers - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Abdominal injuries occur relatively infrequently during trauma, and they rarely require surgical intervention. In this era of non-operative management of abdominal injuries, surgeons are seldom exposed to these patients. Consequently, surgeons may misinterpret the mechanism of injury, underestimate symptoms and radiologic findings, and delay definite treatment. Here, we determined the incidence, diagnosis, and treatment of traumatic abdominal injuries at our hospital to provide a basis for identifying potential hazards in non-operative management of patients with these injuries in a low trauma volume hospital.
This retrospective study included prehospital and in-hospital assessments of 110 patients that received 147 abdominal injuries from an isolated abdominal trauma (n = 70 patients) or during multiple trauma (n = 40 patients). Patients were primarily treated at the University Hospital of Umeå from January 2000 to December 2009.
The median New Injury Severity Score was 9 (range: 1-57) for 147 abdominal injuries. Most patients (94%) received computed tomography (CT), but only 38% of patients with multiple trauma were diagnosed with CT
Notes
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PubMed ID
25124882 View in PubMed
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[Abdominal injuries. Occurrence and outcome]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38063
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1989 Aug 10;109(22):2111-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-1989
Author
T H Edna
T. Bjerkeset
H E Myrvold
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1989 Aug 10;109(22):2111-4
Date
Aug-10-1989
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
A retrospective study of intra-abdominal injuries treated during the ten-year period 1977 to 1986, show that road traffic accidents were responsible for the injury in 38% of 221 patients. Accidents from sports and recreation were the cause in 23% of the cases. The median age was 19 years. Renal injuries were most common, followed by splenic injuries. 119 patients (54%) were operated for abdominal injury. 90 patients (41%) needed blood transfusions and 29 (13%) were treated by respirator. 95 patients had concommitant extraabdominal injuries. The overall lethality was 9%.
PubMed ID
2772874 View in PubMed
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The spectrum of abdominal injuries associated with chance fractures in pediatric patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160577
Source
Eur J Pediatr Surg. 2007 Oct;17(5):322-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
K. Mulpuri
C W Reilly
A. Perdios
S J Tredwell
G K Blair
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. kmulpuri@cw.bc.ca
Source
Eur J Pediatr Surg. 2007 Oct;17(5):322-7
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Length of Stay
Lumbar Vertebrae - injuries - radiography
Male
Multiple Trauma - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Seat Belts - adverse effects
Spinal Fractures - epidemiology - radiography - therapy
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
With the increased use of seat belts in motor vehicles, the frequency of morbidity and mortality associated with motor vehicle accidents may have decreased but there is an associated rise in injuries. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risk of intra-abdominal injury in children who sustained Chance-type fractures in a motor vehicle accident.
A retrospective review was conducted of pediatric patients admitted for injuries sustained in motor vehicle accidents between 1984 and 2001. Patients that sustained lumbar Chance fractures and an abdominal injury were reviewed.
A total of 25 patients with lumbar Chance fractures were seen at our institution; twelve had associated abdominal injuries. The mean age at the time of injury was 10.9 years and the most recent follow-up was a mean of 4.8 years after injury. All patients were involved in high-speed motor vehicle collisions. Eleven patients were restrained using a 2-point restraint and only one was restrained using a 3-point restraint.
The abdominal injury patients had a significantly higher Chance fracture index than those patients who also suffered Chance fractures but no associated abdominal injuries. Success in the management of intra-abdominal injuries is dependent on the awareness that such an injury exists.
PubMed ID
17968788 View in PubMed
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Treatment of splenic trauma in Norway: a retrospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294703
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2017 Nov 23; 25(1):112
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-23-2017
Author
Trond Dehli
Jorunn Skattum
Bjørn Christensen
Ole-Petter Vinjevoll
Bent-Åge Rolandsen
Christine Gaarder
Pål Aksel Næss
Torben Wisborg
Author Affiliation
Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, University Hospital North Norway Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway. trond.dehli@unn.no.
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2017 Nov 23; 25(1):112
Date
Nov-23-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Adolescent
Adult
Angiography
Embolization, Therapeutic
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Admission
Retrospective Studies
Spleen - injuries
Splenectomy
Trauma Centers
Treatment Outcome
Wounds, Nonpenetrating - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Young Adult
Abstract
Non-operative management of splenic injuries has become the treatment of choice in hemodynamically stable patients over the last decades. The aim of the study is to describe the incidence, initial treatment and early outcome of patients with splenic injuries on a national level.
All hospitals in Norway admitting trauma patients were invited to participate in the study. The study period was January through December 2013. The hospitals delivered anonymous data on primarily admitted patients with splenic injury.
Three of the four regional trauma centers and 26 of the remaining 33 acute care hospitals delivered data on a total of 151 patients with splenic injury indicating an incidence of 4 splenic injuries per 100,000 inhabitants/year, and a median of 4 splenic injuries per hospital per year. A total of 128 (85%) patients were successfully treated non-operatively including 20 patients who underwent an angiographic procedure. The remaining 23 (15%) patients underwent open splenectomy or spleen-preserving surgery.
Most patients with splenic injuries are managed non-operatively. Despite the low number of splenic injuries per hospital, the results indicate satisfactory outcome on a national level.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29169401 View in PubMed
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