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33 records – page 1 of 4.

[All preschool children in Sweden need vitamin D fortified food. Dark-skinned children need vitamin D supplementation also after the age of 2].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99913
Source
Lakartidningen. 2010 Oct 13-19;107(41):2471-3
Publication Type
Article

An estimate of the economic burden and premature deaths due to vitamin D deficiency in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144580
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2010 Aug;54(8):1172-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
William B Grant
Gerry K Schwalfenberg
Stephen J Genuis
Susan J Whiting
Author Affiliation
Sunlight, Nutrition, and Health Research Center (SUNARC), San Francisco, CA 94164-1603, USA. wbgrant@infionline.net
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2010 Aug;54(8):1172-81
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
25-Hydroxyvitamin D 2 - blood
Adult
Calcifediol - blood
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Female
Health Care Costs
Humans
Infant
Male
Mortality
Nutrition Policy
Pregnancy
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - physiology
Vitamin D Deficiency - economics - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Abstract
The objective of this work is to estimate the economic burden and premature death rate in Canada attributable to low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to many diseases and conditions in addition to bone diseases, including many types of cancer, several bacterial and viral infections, autoimmune diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Canadians have mean serum 25(OH)D levels averaging 67 nmol/L. The journal literature was searched for papers reporting dose-response relationships for vitamin D indices and disease outcomes. The types of studies useful in this regard include randomized controlled trials, observational, cross-sectional, and ecological studies, and meta-analyses. The mortality rates for 2005 were obtained from Statistics Canada. The economic burden data were obtained from Health Canada. The estimated benefits in disease reduction were based on increasing the mean serum 25(OH)D level to 105 nmol/L. It is estimated that the death rate could fall by 37,000 deaths (22,300-52,300 deaths), representing 16.1% (9.7-22.7%) of annuals deaths and the economic burden by 6.9% (3.8-10.0%) or $14.4 billion ($8.0 billion-$20.1 billion) less the cost of the program. It is recommended that Canadian health policy leaders consider measures to increase serum 25(OH)D levels for all Canadians.
PubMed ID
20352622 View in PubMed
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[Breast density: a biomarker to better understand and prevent breast cancer].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167463
Source
Bull Cancer. 2006 Sep;93(9):847-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Jacques Brisson
Sylvie Bérubé
Caroline Diorio
Author Affiliation
Unité de recherche en santé des populations (URESP), Centre hospitalier affilié universitaire de Québec, 1050 chemin Sainte-Foy, Québec, Qc, Canada G1S 4L8. jacques.brisson@uresp.ulaval.ca
Source
Bull Cancer. 2006 Sep;93(9):847-55
Date
Sep-2006
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
25-Hydroxyvitamin D 2 - blood
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal - therapeutic use
Breast - drug effects - pathology
Breast Neoplasms - blood - pathology - prevention & control
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage - blood
Female
Humans
Mammography
Polymorphism, Genetic
Premenopause
Quebec
Receptors, Calcitriol - genetics
Risk assessment
Somatomedins - genetics - metabolism
Tamoxifen - therapeutic use
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood
Abstract
In Quebec, cancer is the principal cause of mortality. This epidemiologic research program includes two components. The first component takes place at the "Institut national de santé publique du Québec" and involves surveillance and evaluation of practices in oncology with the aim of providing the Quebec Ministry of Health with some of the evidence needed to determine its policies in cancer control. The second component takes place at the "Unité de recherche en santé des populations (URESP)" of Laval University and is devoted to studying the etiology and prevention of breast cancer. This paper focuses on this second research component which uses mammographic breast density as an intermediate biomarker to study the causes of breast cancer and strategies to prevent it. Breast cancer risk is much higher among women with very dense breasts than among those with little or no breast density. Recently, we were among the first to show that women with high vitamin D or calcium intakes have less breast density than those with low intakes, especially among premenopausal women. Furthermore, we have confirmed that breast density was increased among premenopausal women with high levels of IGF-I and low levels of IGFBP3 which is consistent with the observed effect of these molecules on breast cancer risk. Studies are now being conducted to assess whether breast density varies according to blood levels of vitamin D and of additional growth factors, as well as to genetic polymorphisms involved in the pathways of vitamin D, calcium and growth factors. The increase in vitamin D and calcium intakes may prove to be a safe and inexpensive approach to breast cancer prevention; this possibility should be carefully examined as quickly as possible.
PubMed ID
16980227 View in PubMed
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The change in plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D did not differ between breast-fed infants that received a daily supplement of ergocalciferol or cholecalciferol for 3 months.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117894
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Feb;143(2):148-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Sina Gallo
Anna Phan
Catherine A Vanstone
Celia Rodd
Hope A Weiler
Author Affiliation
School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Feb;143(2):148-53
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
25-Hydroxyvitamin D 2 - blood
Adult
Breast Feeding
Calcifediol - blood
Cholecalciferol - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Dietary Supplements
Ergocalciferols - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immunoassay
Infant
Intention to Treat Analysis
Male
Patient compliance
Quebec - epidemiology
Remission Induction
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - diet therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The biological equivalency of ergocalciferol (D2) and cholecalciferol (D3) has been debated; several comparisons have appeared in the adult literature but are scarce in pediatrics. The objective of this study was to compare increases in plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations and attainment of 50 and 75 mol/L status cutoffs following 3 mo of daily supplementation with D2 compared with D3. Healthy, breast-fed, 1-mo-old infants (n = 52) received 10 µg (400 ic) of either D2 or D3 daily. At 1 and 4 mo of age, plasma 25-hydroxyergocalciferol and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography tandem MS (LC-MS/MS) and total 25(OH)D by chemiluminescent immunoassay (DiaSorin Liaison). Data were analyzed using t tests and ?² by intent to treat. A total of 23% of infants were deficient (=24.9 nmol/L) at baseline and 2% at follow-up on the basis of LC-MS/MS. At 4 mo, 96% were breastfed and there were no differences in compliance, breastfeeding rates, or sun exposure among groups. The change in total 25(OH)D measured by LC-MS/MS did not differ between the D2 (17.6 ± 26.7 nmol/L) and D3 (22.2 ± 20.2 nmol/L) groups. In the combined groups, the baseline plasma 25(OH)D concentration was inversely related to the change in total 25(OH)D (r = -0.52; P
Notes
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PubMed ID
23256143 View in PubMed
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Changes in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and cholecalciferol after one whole-body exposure in a commercial tanning bed: a randomized study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126429
Source
Endocrine. 2012 Oct;42(2):430-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Jacob H Langdahl
Louise Lind Schierbeck
Ulrich Christian Bang
Jens-Erik Beck Jensen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Endocrine. 2012 Oct;42(2):430-5
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
25-Hydroxyvitamin D 2 - blood - metabolism
Adult
Beauty Culture - economics - instrumentation
Calcifediol - blood - metabolism
Cholecalciferol - blood - metabolism
Denmark
Double-Blind Method
European Continental Ancestry Group
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Kinetics
Middle Aged
Skin - metabolism - radiation effects
Ultraviolet Rays
Vitamin D Deficiency - prevention & control
Whole-Body Irradiation - adverse effects - economics
Abstract
We wanted to evaluate the cutaneous synthesis of 25OHD and cholecalciferol after one whole-body exposure to ultraviolet radiation type B (UVB) in a randomized setup. Healthy volunteers were randomized to one whole-body exposure in a commercial tanning bed with UVB emission (UVB/UVA ratio 1.8-2.0%) or an identical placebo tanning bed without UVB. The output in the 280-320 nm range was 450 ?W/cm?. Blood samples were analyzed for 25OHD and cholecalciferol at baseline and during 7 days after treatment. We included 20 volunteers, 11 to UVB and 9 to placebo treatment. During the first 6 h, no significant differences in 25OHD between the groups were found. At the end of the study, we found a mean increase of 25OHD in the UVB group of 4.5 nmol/l (SD 7 nmol/l) compared to a decline of -1.2 nmol/l (SD 7 nmol/l) in the placebo group (p = 0.1). A linear mixed model yielded an increase of 25OHD in the UVB group of 1.0 nmol/l per 24 h (p
PubMed ID
22391940 View in PubMed
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Common variants in CYP2R1 and GC genes are both determinants of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations after UVB irradiation and after consumption of vitamin D3-fortified bread and milk during winter in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260614
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 Jan;101(1):218-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Janna Nissen
Ulla Vogel
Gitte Ravn-Haren
Elisabeth W Andersen
Katja H Madsen
Bjørn A Nexø
Rikke Andersen
Heddie Mejborn
Poul J Bjerrum
Lone B Rasmussen
Hans Christian Wulf
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 Jan;101(1):218-27
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
25-Hydroxyvitamin D 2 - blood
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Bread
Calcifediol - blood
Child
Cholecalciferol - metabolism - therapeutic use
Cholestanetriol 26-Monooxygenase - genetics - metabolism
Denmark
Double-Blind Method
Food, Fortified
Genetic Association Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Milk
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Seasons
Skin - metabolism - radiation effects
Ultraviolet Therapy
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - genetics - metabolism - prevention & control
Vitamin D-Binding Protein - genetics - metabolism
Whole-Body Irradiation
Young Adult
Abstract
Little is known about how the genetic variation in vitamin D modulating genes influences ultraviolet (UV)B-induced 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations. In the Food with vitamin D (VitmaD) study, we showed that common genetic variants rs10741657 and rs10766197 in 25-hydroxylase (CYP2R1) and rs842999 and rs4588 in vitamin D binding protein (GC) predict 25(OH)D concentrations at late summer and after 6-mo consumption of cholecalciferol (vitamin D3)-fortified bread and milk.
In the current study, called the Vitamin D in genes (VitDgen) study, we analyzed associations between the increase in 25(OH)D concentrations after a given dose of artificial UVB irradiation and 25 single nucleotide polymorphisms located in or near genes involved in vitamin D synthesis, transport, activation, or degradation as previously described for the VitmaD study. Second, we aimed to determine whether the genetic variations in CYP2R1 and GC have similar effects on 25(OH)D concentrations after artificial UVB irradiation and supplementation by vitamin D3-fortified bread and milk.
The VitDgen study includes 92 healthy Danes who received 4 whole-body UVB treatments with a total dose of 6 or 7.5 standard erythema doses during a 10-d period in winter. The VitmaD study included 201 healthy Danish families who were given vitamin D3-fortified bread and milk or placebo for 6 mo during the winter.
After UVB treatments, rs10741657 in CYP2R1 and rs4588 in GC predicted UVB-induced 25(OH)D concentrations as previously shown in the VitmaD study. Compared with noncarriers, carriers of 4 risk alleles of rs10741657 and rs4588 had lowest concentrations and smallest increases in 25(OH)D concentrations after 4 UVB treatments and largest decreases in 25(OH)D concentrations after 6-mo consumption of vitamin D3-fortified bread and milk.
Common genetic variants in the CYP2R1 and GC genes modify 25(OH)D concentrations in the same manner after artificial UVB-induced vitamin D and consumption of vitamin D3-fortified bread and milk.
PubMed ID
25527766 View in PubMed
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Conversion from conventional to nocturnal hemodialysis improves vitamin D levels.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164366
Source
Kidney Int. 2007 Jun;71(11):1172-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
S J Nessim
S V Jassal
S V Fung
C T Chan
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Kidney Int. 2007 Jun;71(11):1172-6
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
25-Hydroxyvitamin D 2 - blood
Adult
African Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Calcitriol - blood
Canada
Circadian Rhythm
Cohort Studies
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Phosphorus - blood
Prospective Studies
Renal Dialysis
Uremia - therapy
Vitamin D - blood
Abstract
Patients on conventional hemodialysis have low levels of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D probably due to diet and decreased cutaneous synthesis. As 1,25 dihydroxy-vitamin D synthesis is substrate-dependent in end-stage renal disease, this could be a contributing factor to low 1,25 dihydroxy-vitamin D levels in patients undergoing conventional hemodialysis. We converted 35 patients historically on conventional hemodialysis to nocturnal hemodialysis for a minimum of 6 months thereby significantly increasing sessional equilibrated Kt/V from an average of 1.30 to an average of 2.01. Dietary restrictions were also removed. Serum phosphorus significantly fell, whereas the serum calcium, parathyroid hormone, and the mean dose of calcitriol did not change after the conversion. Significant increases in both 25-hydroxy and 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D levels were seen after hemodialysis mode conversion. A significant correlation was found between the dialysis dose and the levels of both hydroxylated forms of vitamin D. We suggest that improving uremia by nocturnal hemodialysis in the absence of exogenous supplementation is associated with increased 25 and 1,25-hydroxy-vitamin D levels. Additionally, normalization of serum phosphorus may improve 1alpha-hydroxylation thereby enhancing substrate-dependent generation of 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D in chronic dialysis patients.
PubMed ID
17396116 View in PubMed
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Development and validation of an interview-administered FFQ for assessment of vitamin D and calcium intakes in Finnish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274593
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Mar 28;115(6):1100-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-28-2016
Author
Suvi T Itkonen
Maijaliisa Erkkola
Essi Skaffari
Pilvi Saaristo
Elisa M Saarnio
Heli T Viljakainen
Merja U M Kärkkäinen
Christel J E Lamberg-Allardt
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Mar 28;115(6):1100-7
Date
Mar-28-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
25-Hydroxyvitamin D 2 - blood
Adult
Biomarkers - blood
Calcifediol - blood
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Diet
Diet Records
Dietary Supplements
Female
Finland
Food, Fortified
Humans
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Young Adult
Abstract
Increased vitamin D fortification of dairy products has increased the supply of vitamin D-containing products with different vitamin D contents on the market in Finland. The authors developed a ninety-eight-item FFQ with eight food groups and with a question on supplementation to assess dietary and supplemental vitamin D and Ca intakes in Finnish women (60ºN). The FFQ was validated in subgroups with different habitual vitamin D supplement use (0-57·5 µg/d) against the biomarker serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (S-25(OH)D) and against 3-d food records (FR) (n 29-67). Median total vitamin D intake among participants was 9·4 (range 1·6-30·5) µg/d. Spearman's correlations for vitamin D and Ca ranged from 0·28 (P 0·146, FFQ v. S-25(OH)D, persons not using supplements) to 0·75 (P
PubMed ID
26856375 View in PubMed
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The effect of conventional vitamin D(2) supplementation on serum 25(OH)D concentration is weak among peripubertal Finnish girls: a 3-y prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190271
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 May;56(5):431-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
M. Lehtonen-Veromaa
T. Möttönen
I. Nuotio
K. Irjala
J. Viikari
Author Affiliation
Paavo Nurmi Centre, Sport and Exercise Medicine Unit, Department of Physiology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 May;56(5):431-7
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
25-Hydroxyvitamin D 2 - blood
Adolescent
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Child
Dietary Supplements
Ergocalciferols - administration & dosage
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Radioimmunoassay
Seasons
Sunlight
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Abstract
To study the effect of vitamin D supplementation and the impact of summer season on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (S-25(OH)D) in Finnish 9-15-y-old girls.
Three-year follow-up study with vitamin D(2) supplementation using D(2) 10 microg daily from October to January for the first and from October to February for the second winter as well as 20 microg daily from October to March for the third winter.
Paavo Nurmi Centre, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
A total of 171 female volunteers aged 9-15 y.
Vitamin D and calcium intakes were estimated by a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). S-25(OH)D was measured by radioimmunoassay.
The median daily dietary intakes of vitamin D and calcium were 3.8 microg (interquartile range (IQR) 2.7-5.0) and 1451 mg (IQR 1196-1812), respectively, over 3 y. The prevalence of severe hypovitaminosis D (S-25(OH)D
PubMed ID
12001014 View in PubMed
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33 records – page 1 of 4.