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5th Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference and Forum (2012) : "Resilience in a changing world". [Abstract book]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297025
Source
Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference Forum 2012. UAF Bristol Bay Campus, Dillingham, Alaska, March 28-31, 2012. 50 p.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2012
administrative needs. The registration desk will be open: Wednesday, March 28 from 6:00 to 8:00 pm: Pre-Registration Pizza Social (Sea Inn). Thursday, March 29 from 8:00am to 5:00pm: Bristol Bay Campus Lobby Friday, March 30 from 8:00am to 5:00pm: Bristol Bay Campus Lobby Saturday, March 31 from 8:00am
  1 document  
Source
Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference Forum 2012. UAF Bristol Bay Campus, Dillingham, Alaska, March 28-31, 2012. 50 p.
Date
2012
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
3624398
Keywords
Alaska
Fisheries
Marine science
Traditional knowledge
Subsistence
Sustainable energy
Waste disposal
Food security
Ecosystems
Education
Documents
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14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health -- Abstract book

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96055
Source
14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, July 11-16, 2009, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada
Date
2009
HEALING ...................................................................................................................................................23 THE MEDICAL-SOCIAL AID TO THE ABORIGINES OF THE RUSSIAN NORTHERN TERRITORIES CONDUCTING TRADITIONAL VITAL ACTIVITY ................... 24 PAN
  1 document  
Source
14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, July 11-16, 2009, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada
Date
2009
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Documents

abstract-book-2009.8.6.pdf

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A 14-year comparison of Alaska homeless

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102153
Source
Pages 209-212 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
welfare and criminal justice systems. The survey built on the most recent previous study of the homeless popula- tion in Anchorage, conducted in March 1978 by the State of Alaska Department of Health and Social Services and the Center For Alcohol and Addiction Studies of the University of Alaska
  1 document  
Author
Reynolds, G
Huelsman, M
Fisher, D
Parker, W
Jones, J
Beirne, H
Author Affiliation
Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, University of Alaska Anchorage
Municipality of Anchorage, Department of Health and Human Services, Anchorage, Alaska
Source
Pages 209-212 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Anchorage
Ethnicity
Homeless population
Abstract
To show the changes over time of the rapidly increasing homeless population, the Municipality of Anchorage conducted a survey in 1992. This survey replicated Kelso et al. (1978). 310 homeless individuals were interviewed across 9 sites. Sampling was proportionately stratified by sex and location. There were no significant differences across the two studies in marital status, gender, employment status, and substance abuse. There were recent increases in the number of whites, blacks, number of recent arrivals, use of agencies for shelter rather than residential hotels, and low income. Therefore, the current homeless population is more mobile, poorer, and more dependent upon social agencies.
Documents
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1986 and beyond. A look into the future.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236215
Source
Psychiatr Clin North Am. 1986 Dec;9(4):797-803
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1986
Author
C. Stavrakaki
B. Vargo
Source
Psychiatr Clin North Am. 1986 Dec;9(4):797-803
Date
Dec-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Criminal Law
Financing, Government
Human Rights
Humans
Intellectual Disability
Jurisprudence
Marriage
Social Justice
Sterilization
United States
Abstract
Recent research in the field of mental retardation has pointed to a better-defined population with exacting prevalence of the basic pathology and related disabilities. Advances in the areas of prevention and treatment have further reduced the prevalence and incidence of mental retardation. Current legislation and legislative procedures have led to a more equitable and fairer application of human rights to all citizens. However, discrepancies and ambiguities still remain with respect to interpretation of the spirit of the law as related to the retarded. Financial restraints and serious economic hardship have impacted on social and political attitudes and created two-tier systems of the rich and poor with the retarded referred to as "surplus population." This situation has, in turn, influenced the availability of resources, manpower, training, and research in this field. The future could be brighter if sociologic and philosophic changes parallel technologic advances. It is our duty and commitment to continue and further the developments in all spheres relevant to the retarded in order to maximize human potential whenever possible.
PubMed ID
3809000 View in PubMed
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2007 Alaska Health Workforce Vacancy Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297295
Source
Alaska Center for Rural Health - Alaska's AHEC. University of Alaska Anchorage. 79 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
July 2007
- DP024673). Additional funding was provided by the Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority. We wish to thank Dr. Andre Rosay of the Justice Center, UAA, and Dr. Brian Saylor and Shannon Deike-Sims of the Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies, UAA for their help with the design of the study methodology
  1 document  
Source
Alaska Center for Rural Health - Alaska's AHEC. University of Alaska Anchorage. 79 p.
Date
July 2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1050325
Keywords
Alaska
Medical personnel
Supply and demand
Statistics
Health facilities
Employees
Medical care surveys
Health planning
Manpower planning
Documents
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Aboriginal Food Security in Northern Canada: An assessment of the state of knowledge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297086
Source
Expert Panel on the State of Knowledge of Food Security in Northern Canada, Council of Canadian Academies.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2014
Canada. Led by a 12-member Board of Governors and advised by a 16-member Scientific Advisory Committee, the Council’s work encompasses a broad definition of science, incorporating the natural, social, and health sciences as well as engineering and the humanities. Council assessments are conducted by
  1 document  
Source
Expert Panel on the State of Knowledge of Food Security in Northern Canada, Council of Canadian Academies.
Date
2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
4736035
Keywords
Canada, Northern
Naive Poeples
Nutrition
Food security
Traditional knowledge
Experience
Policies
Notes
ISBN 978-1-926558-73-8 (pbk.)
ISBN 978-1-926558-74-5 (pdf)
Documents

foodsecurity_fullreporten.pdf

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Aboriginal youth suicide in Quebec: the contribution of public policy for prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108699
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2013 Sep-Dec;36(5-6):399-405
Publication Type
Article
Author
Michel Tousignant
Livia Vitenti
Nathalie Morin
Author Affiliation
CRISE, University of Quebec in Montreal, Canada. Electronic address: tousignant.michel@uqam.ca.
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2013 Sep-Dec;36(5-6):399-405
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Crime
Databases, Factual
Female
Housing
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Public Policy
Qualitative Research
Quebec - ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
Suicide - ethnology - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The high rate of youth suicide in some First Nations villages of Northern Quebec is an important public health problem. Based on a six-year field study in three villages belonging to the Atikamekw and Anishinabe groups, this paper proposes changes in three areas of social policy that could contribute to prevention of youth suicide. These three areas are: youth protection, administration of justice, and housing. An argument is made first to adapt the youth protection law of Quebec and to give greater responsibility to communities in individual cases in order to prevent child placement outside the villages. Regarding the administration of justice, we suggest initiatives to encourage rapid prosecution of crimes on reserves and the adoption of an approach based on reconciliation between perpetrator and victim. Finally, we indicate how housing measures could help safeguard children's wellbeing given that overcrowding can contribute to suicide. The discussion also proposes that these three key changes in social policy could be relevant in other Aboriginal communities both within and outside of Quebec.
PubMed ID
23856179 View in PubMed
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Abstracts: Oral presentations [Maternal and Child Health]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284553
Source
Pages 224-240 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
determining the availability and effectiveness of the recommendations made by FASO diagnostic clinics in education, mental health, social service, justice and related systems. They are also devel- oping a lifelong developmental trajectory for understanding the multifaceted needs of people with FASO
  1 document  
Source
Pages 224-240 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Documents
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Abstracts: Oral presentations [Primary Care, Service Delivery, Health Promotion and E-Health]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286447
Source
Pages 494-504 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
. Williamson, Nuna vut Tunngavik Incorporated; I. Sobol and G. Osborne, Government of Nunavut Department of Health and Social Services; K. Young, University of Toronto, Canada Dietary iron intake is insufficient to explain the prevalence of anemia among Inuit. Primary Objective: To document the dietary
  1 document  
Source
Pages 494-504 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Other
Documents
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Abstracts: Oral presentations [Public Health Perspectives]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284455
Source
Pages 37-51 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
, neces- sitating northern research by Northerners. A pan-northern consortium of women's groups, two from each territory and the Four Worlds Centre for Development worked closely together researching women's homelessness in each terri- tory t o inform policy and decision-makers, social justice
  1 document  
Source
Pages 37-51 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Documents
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Acceptance, avoidance, and ambiguity: conflicting social values about childhood disability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170909
Source
Kennedy Inst Ethics J. 2005 Dec;15(4):371-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Carol Levine
Author Affiliation
Families and Health Care Project, United Hospital Fund, New York, NY, USA.
Source
Kennedy Inst Ethics J. 2005 Dec;15(4):371-83
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Caregivers - psychology
Child
Chronic Disease - psychology
Data Collection
Dependency (Psychology)
Disabled Children - psychology
Family Relations
Home Nursing - psychology
Humans
Parents - psychology
Quebec
Respiration, Artificial - ethics - psychology
Siblings - psychology
Social Isolation
Social Justice
Social Values
Ventilators, Mechanical
Abstract
Advances in medical technology now permit children who need ventilator assistance to live at home rather than in hospitals or institutions. What does this ventilator-dependent life mean to children and their families? The impetus for this essay comes from a study of the moral experience of 12 Canadian families--parents, ventilator-dependent child, and well siblings. These families express great love for their children, take on enormous responsibilities for care, live with uncertainty, and attempt to create "normal" home environments. Nevertheless, they experience social isolation, sometimes even from their extended families and health care providers. Their lives are constrained in many ways. The challenges faced by parents of technology-dependent children raise questions of justice within society and within families.
PubMed ID
16453960 View in PubMed
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Accommodating a social work student with a speech impairment: the shared experience of a student and instructor.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139086
Source
J Soc Work Disabil Rehabil. 2010;9(4):235-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Kimberly Calderwood
Jonathan Degenhardt
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada. kcalder@uwindsor.ca
Source
J Soc Work Disabil Rehabil. 2010;9(4):235-53
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Humans
Male
Ontario
Social Justice
Social Work - education
Speech
Stuttering - psychology
Teaching
Abstract
This ethnographic study describes the results of a collaborative journaling process that occurred between a student and his instructor of a second-year social work communications course. Many questions from the student's and the instructor's perspectives are raised regarding accommodating the student with a severe speech impairment in a course that specifically focuses on communication skills. Preliminary recommendations are made for social work students and professionals with communication limitations, and for social work educators.
PubMed ID
21104514 View in PubMed
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Action plan for interpersonal violence prevention in Anchorage, Alaska

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100758
Publication Type
Report
Date
Apr-2003
  1 website  
Author
Municipality of Anchorage Department of Health and Human Services, Social Services Division, SAFE City Program
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Anchorage, Alaska
Domestic Violence
Monitoring
Prevention
Sexual assault and rape
Abstract
Released in June 2001, Anchorage?s Domestic Violence Action Plan is the community?s primary tool to address domestic violence and related sexual assault in Anchorage, Alaska. The Action Plan was developed under the leadership of the Anchorage Women?s Commission, Special Committee on Domestic Violence. The Special Committee was comprised of local and state interpersonal violence prevention providers, criminal justice officials, policymakers, health and human service providers, survivors of interpersonal violence, and other professionals and private citizens from Anchorage?s diverse community. Over a three-month period, the Special Committee developed a framework with local leaders that recognize and work within Anchorage?s rich multi-cultural community.
Online Resources
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Adaptation Actions for a Changing Arctic: Perspectives from the Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort Region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296384
Source
Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP), Oslo, Norway. xiv, 255 p.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2017
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 3.3.1 Subsistence values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 3.3.2 Social and cultural well-being
  1 document  
Source
Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP), Oslo, Norway. xiv, 255 p.
Date
2017
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
39855038
Abstract
From Introduction: This report represents a significant first-step to synthesize environmental information and to use that information to inform others about future conditions and potential outcomes in the BCB region for people and their communities. As such, many scientific uncertainties were identified and information needs noted as they pertain to climate change adaptation planning. Human needs and considerations tend to be considered holistically throughout. This is somewhat novel, especially given that multiple nations (USA, Canada, and Russia) and governance structures are involved. There is a message throughout that ecosystem-level information is a necessary component for understanding climate effects and their interactions, including changing conditions far-removed from the BCB region. The latter includes environmental effects or changes in the marketplace due to globalization. There is strong agreement throughout the report that continuing subsistence activities will be a critical element of food security despite local participation in the cash economy. Subsistence lifestyles and resources must be protected through effective management across the entire BCB region. Within the planning dimension, scenarios could be more effectively employed to guide these strategies by applying the information assembled in this report.
Notes
ISBN 978-82-7971-103-2
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Adaptive governance and institutional strategies for climate-induced community relocations in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113760
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2013 Jun 4;110(23):9320-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-4-2013
Author
Robin Bronen
F Stuart Chapin
Author Affiliation
Resilience and Adaptation Program, Alaska Institute for Justice, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA. rbronen@yahoo.com
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2013 Jun 4;110(23):9320-5
Date
Jun-4-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Climate change
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods
Consumer Participation
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Policy
Humans
Residence Characteristics
Abstract
This article presents governance and institutional strategies for climate-induced community relocations. In Alaska, repeated extreme weather events coupled with climate change-induced coastal erosion impact the habitability of entire communities. Community residents and government agencies concur that relocation is the only adaptation strategy that can protect lives and infrastructure. Community relocation stretches the financial and institutional capacity of existing governance institutions. Based on a comparative analysis of three Alaskan communities, Kivalina, Newtok, and Shishmaref, which have chosen to relocate, we examine the institutional constraints to relocation in the United States. We identify policy changes and components of a toolkit that can facilitate community-based adaptation when environmental events threaten people's lives and protection in place is not possible. Policy changes include amendment of the Stafford Act to include gradual geophysical processes, such as erosion, in the statutory definition of disaster and the creation of an adaptive governance framework to allow communities a continuum of responses from protection in place to community relocation. Key components of the toolkit are local leadership and integration of social and ecological well-being into adaptation planning.
Notes
Cites: Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2010 May;1196:1-35420593524
Cites: Environ Manage. 2008 Apr;41(4):487-50018228089
PubMed ID
23690592 View in PubMed
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Addressing elder abuse: the Waterloo restorative justice approach to elder abuse project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135616
Source
J Elder Abuse Negl. 2011 Apr;23(2):127-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Arlene Groh
Rick Linden
Author Affiliation
Healing Approaches for Elder Abuse and Mistreatment, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Elder Abuse Negl. 2011 Apr;23(2):127-46
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers - legislation & jurisprudence
Community Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Cooperative Behavior
Elder Abuse - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - therapy
Health Services for the Aged - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Humans
Ontario
Patient Advocacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Patient Care Team - legislation & jurisprudence
Program Evaluation
Risk assessment
Social Support
Vulnerable Populations - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The Community Care Access Centre (CCAC) of Waterloo Region, in partnership with a number of other social service agencies, designed and implemented a restorative justice model applicable to older adults who have been abused by an individual in a position of trust. The project was very successful in building partnerships, as many community agencies came together to deal with the problem of elder abuse. The program also raised the profile of elder abuse in the community. However, despite intensive efforts, referrals to the restorative justice program were quite low. Because of this, the program moved to a new organizational model, the Elder Abuse Response Team (EART), which has retained the guiding philosophy of restorative justice but has broadened the mandate. The team has evolved into a conflict management system that has multiple points of entry for cases and multiple options for dealing with elder abuse. The team has developed a broad range of community partners who can facilitate referrals to the EART and also can help to provide an individualized response to each case. The transition to the EART has been successful, and the number of referrals has increased significantly.
PubMed ID
21462047 View in PubMed
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Addressing historic environmental exposures along the Alaska Highway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107704
Source
Pages 787-795 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):787-795
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
-tailed Fisher's Exact test , which is designed specifically for small data sets with uneven cohorts and single digit cells (24). Limitations of analysis The many historic and contemporary environmental and social factors that influence public health are not well documented in Northway, nor readily
  1 document  
Author
Anna Godduhn
Lawrence Duffy
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA
Source
Pages 787-795 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):787-795
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Animals, Wild
Diet - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis - history
Fishes
Food Contamination
Health status
History, 20th Century
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Thyroid Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
A World War II defense site at Northway, Alaska, was remediated in the 1990s, leaving complex questions regarding historic exposures to toxic waste. This article describes the context, methods, limitations and findings of the Northway Wild Food and Health Project (NWFHP).
The NWFHP comprised 2 pilot studies: the Northway Wild Food Study (NWFS), which investigated contaminants in locally prioritized traditional foods over time, and the Northway Health Study (NHS), which investigated locally suspected links between resource uses and health problems.
This research employed mixed methods. The NWFS reviewed remedial documents and existing data. The NHS collected household information regarding resource uses and health conditions by questionnaire and interview. NHS data represent general (yes or no) personal knowledge that was often second hand. Retrospective cohort comparisons were made of the reported prevalence of 7 general health problems between groups based on their reported (yes or no) consumption of particular resources, for 3 data sets (existing, historic and combined) with a two-tailed Fisher's Exact Test in SAS (n = 325 individuals in 83 households, 24 of which no longer exist).
The NWFS identified historic pathways of exposure to petroleum, pesticides, herbicides, chlorinated byproducts of disinfection and lead from resources that were consumed more frequently decades ago and are not retrospectively quantifiable. The NHS found complex patterns of association between reported resource uses and cancer and thyroid-, reproductive-, metabolic- and cardiac problems.
Lack of detail regarding medical conditions, undocumented histories of exposure, time lapsed since the release of pollution and changes to health and health care over the same period make this exploratory research. Rather than demonstrate causation, these results document the legitimacy of local suspicions and warrant additional investigation. This article presents our findings, with discussion of limitations related to study design and limitations that are inherent to such research.
Notes
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2002 Feb;110 Suppl 1:25-4211834461
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2010 Sep;69(4):344-5120719107
Cites: Circulation. 2002 Jul 23;106(4):523-712135957
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2004 Oct;17(5):449-5915357699
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 1992 Sep;33(3):267-811401851
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1993 Oct;101(5):378-848080506
Cites: BMJ. 1995 Jul 1;311(6996):42-57613329
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1999 Aug;107 Suppl 4:613-810421771
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2008 Feb;108(2):266-7318237575
Cites: Int J Androl. 2008 Apr;31(2):233-4018248400
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2008 Aug;116(8):1009-1418709167
Cites: Endocr Rev. 2009 Jun;30(4):293-34219502515
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Jul;117(7):1033-4119654909
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Nov;117(11):A47820049095
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Nov;117(11):1652-520049113
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Aug;118(8):1091-920483701
Cites: Environ Manage. 2002 Apr;29(4):451-6612071497
PubMed ID
23984298 View in PubMed
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Addressing social and gender inequalities in health among seniors in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184961
Source
Cad Saude Publica. 2003 May-Jun;19(3):855-60
Publication Type
Article
Author
Louise A Plouffe
Author Affiliation
Division of Aging and Seniors Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Cad Saude Publica. 2003 May-Jun;19(3):855-60
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging - physiology
Canada
Community Health Planning
Female
Health Policy
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Quality of Life
Sex Factors
Social Justice
Social Security
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Although canadian seniors enjoy economic security and good health and have made substantial gains in recent decades, this well-being is not equally shared among socioeconomic groups and between men and women. As for younger age groups, income predicts health status in later life, but less powerfully. Potential alternative explanations include an overriding influence of the aging process, the subjective effects of income loss at retirement and the attenuation of the poverty gap owing to public retirement income. Older women are more likely to age in poverty than men, to live alone and to depend on inadequately resourced chronic health care and social services. These differences will hold as well for the next cohort of seniors in Canada. Addressing these disparities in health requires a comprehensive, multisectoral approach to health that is embodied in Canada's population health model. Application of this model to reduce these disparities is described, drawing upon the key strategies of the population health approach, recent federal government initiatives and actions recommended to the government by federal commissions.
PubMed ID
12806488 View in PubMed
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795 records – page 1 of 40.